Therapist4Chnge

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There has been a few threads over in the doctoral forum about good MS programs to make. Someone more competitive for doctoral training, though they tend to be research heavy. For MS level therapists, clinical psych programs are far more limited bc many programs don't prepare the student for licensure. Attending a mental health counseling program or similar is a better bet for people who want to do therapy. An MSW program can be good, though the focus of each program varies.

What are you looking to do with the degree? That will most inform your options.
 

erg923

Regional Clinical Officer, Centene Corporation
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At present, there isn't a dedicated Masters degree specifically designed for clinical physiology. This may change shortly as the Higher Education Institutes develop courses in line with the Department of Health's Modernizing Scientific Careers programme. What is currently on offer is displayed below:


Modules of Masters Level


* Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing in Respiratory Medicine
* Sleep Diagnostics
* Cardiac Rhythm Management
* Cardiac Ultrasound
Thats nice and all, but this is a psychology forum.
 
Dec 3, 2010
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Not sure if adding a related question to a post is okay or if I should start my own thread. Anyway, I was told that most counseling is done on the masters level, but am curious why terminal masters programs in clinical psych are so hard to find.
 
Jul 7, 2010
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Not sure if adding a related question to a post is okay or if I should start my own thread. Anyway, I was told that most counseling is done on the masters level, but am curious why terminal masters programs in clinical psych are so hard to find.

University of Hartford has a MA clinical psych terminal masters.
 
Apr 30, 2010
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Not sure if adding a related question to a post is okay or if I should start my own thread. Anyway, I was told that most counseling is done on the masters level, but am curious why terminal masters programs in clinical psych are so hard to find.

You can't find a master's is clinical medicine either, because it is a doctoral level profession.
 
Dec 13, 2010
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What about MA or MS in neuropsychology or clinical neuropsychology? Do you have any idea where a program like that may be offered?
 

erg923

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What about MA or MS in neuropsychology or clinical neuropsychology? Do you have any idea where a program like that may be offered?
Neuropsychology is a subspecialized area of clinical psychology. It requires doctoral level training. Im sure you can find masters programs in clinical psychoplogy where you can gain some basic expsoure to neuropsychological assessment and neuropsychologiccally-oriented research however.
 
Oct 5, 2010
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Masters programs in Clinical Psychology are rare because you can't practice as a true psychologist without a doctoral degree. You can be a "counselor" but in that case the degree you'd get would likely be in "counseling."

FYI - the Harvard Extension School has just added Clinical Psychology as a field in which you can get an ALM degree. (Master of Liberal Arts.) It does NOT prepare you for licensure (again, you need to have a PhD to gain licensure as a clinical psychologist), but in my experience at HES, this should be quite a rigorous degree, as well as one with reasonable tuition. I am considering pursuing it to update my credentials for admission to a PhD program. (I have an A.B. (bachelor degree) in Psychology from a top liberal arts college, but I graduated in 1999 and have not been working in the Psychology field. I really need new research and letters of recommendation, etc..)

If you want to be a counselor, there are a lot of masters programs, and some MSW programs have strong clinical focus.
 

StudentBsMs11

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There are a couple M.A. programs in counseling psychology which might suit your purposes, and I know of at least one M.S. program in clinical psychology off the top of my head which does prepare its graduates for licensure. So they aren't impossible to find. You might want to check out an M.S.W. program though, as the licensure requirements (at least in my state) aren't nearly as stringent and you can conduct psychotherapy on your own for nearly the same amount of money as any master's level clinician. In short, while I don't know of any list off the top of my head, the programs are out there and you'll want to explore the different options to find exactly what you're looking for. Good luck!
 

Hmela

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Nov 8, 2010
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I applied to (and got accepted to) a Masters in Applied Clinical Psychology at Penn State Harrisburg, if you wanna check that out. The program is supposed to prepare you for licensure.
 
Dec 21, 2009
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Northwestern University has a Master's program in Counseling Psychology which prepares you for licensing in IL and also for other states; now that CA finally has the LCPC license the MA from NU prepares you for that as well. Especially if you stay in IL the program has great connections to the clinical community. The clinical experience is very good but the program does not offer much funding to offset the costs of NU, which can be extremely high. However, if you are looking to practice as an MA level therapist afterwards it is a great program.
 
Dec 31, 2010
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There are several Master's-level clinical psych programs out there. There are also many states that license Master's-level practitioners under various titles and levels of supervision to practice psychology. This includes a handful of states that license Master's-level practitioners to practice psychology independently. A good resource to start with is the professional organization which acts as advocate for Master's-level psychologists: http://www.enamp.org. Several states also have their own chapter of this organization. In considering the MA or MS in clinical psychology, you walk a lonely road, and educating yourself about training, employment, licensure, and professional longevity issues is a MUST before you ever apply.

My advice to the OP is to be very clear about WHY you are seeking Master's-level training in clinical psychology, specifically. If what you really want to do is counseling, I would advise you to consider the MSW, which is a wonderful option that opens many doors (and has the privilege of being understood and recognized by most third-party payers).

Good luck to you!
 
Last edited:
Sep 16, 2010
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YES! There are! I don't understand how these people who have clearly not done their research can be so convicted!
See my list linked HERE (be sure to scroll down to the second post)!
: )

I think they are convicted in the idea that clinical psychology is a doctoral level profession. That is not to say that terminal programs in clinical psych do not exist. They do. The goal and practical purpose of them is as an intermediate step to a PhD/PsyD in clinical psychology. Counseling at a master's level is one thing but, the idea that someone would/should practice independently in the capacity of a clinical psychologist with a master's is absurd in that a level of proficiency needed to say that you can administer, integrate, and interpret a host of cognitive and personality tests; conduct and interpret scientific studies; and are thoroughly trained to provide therapy cannot occur in 2-3 years.
 
Feb 5, 2011
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Toronto, Canada
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Pre-Psychology
I think they are convicted in the idea that clinical psychology is a doctoral level profession. That is not to say that terminal programs in clinical psych do not exist. They do. The goal and practical purpose of them is as an intermediate step to a PhD/PsyD in clinical psychology. Counseling at a master's level is one thing but, the idea that someone would/should practice independently in the capacity of a clinical psychologist with a master's is absurd in that a level of proficiency needed to say that you can administer, integrate, and interpret a host of cognitive and personality tests; conduct and interpret scientific studies; and are thoroughly trained to provide therapy cannot occur in 2-3 years.
Right. You're right. I suppose I just rushed to reply after reading Bertram Walz's + Stigmata's comment.
Although this is an important point, lets assume the poster (now) understands this. If the poster does want to practice Clinical Psych, the poster would have to complete doctoral studies to be licensed in most places in the world, there are exceptions.
HOWEVER, assuming this, there are nonetheless reasons why one might want to pursue a Master's degree before pursuing doctoral studies.
I won't go into them.. yet..