Matrix207

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Jul 5, 2017
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This is a really stupid question, but if someone never took the pre-reqs for med school, and just studied the MCAT/Kaplan science subject books inside-and-out, and learned everything from there, could he/she get a decent store on the MCAT?
 
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tiramisucheese

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This is a really stupid question, but if someone never took the pre-reqs for med school, and just studied the MCAT/Kaplan science subject books inside-and-out, and learned everything from there, could he/she get a decent store on the MCAT?
I mean maybe, but what would be the point? Most schools require those pre-reqs for matriculation anyway.
 
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Matrix207

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I mean maybe, but what would be the point? Most schools require those pre-reqs for matriculation anyway.
I am currently taking the semester off due to financial reasons, and have nothing better to do so decided to study for MCAT lol
 
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blackroses

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I am currently taking the semester off due to financial reasons, and have nothing better to do so decided to study for MCAT lol
I struggle to imagine that it would be possible to teach yourself 1 year worth of physics, 1 year worth of biology, 1 year worth of gen chem, 1 year worth of ochem, half a year worth of biochem, half a year worth of psychology, and half a year worth of sociology in one semester. Even if you were able to simply get through the study guides for all those topics, the chances that you would know all of that well enough to score in the 85th % or higher of some of the smarter people in the country are pretty minimal. Not to mention you'll also need to find time to do practice passages/FL exams.
 
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Optimist Prime

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Jun 23, 2015
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yes its possible if how you learn is by teaching yourself material. I would never go to Biochem and just read and teach myself the material the day before the tests and ace it. With that being said it still probably isn't a smart decision even if you do well because MCATs scores don't last forever so unless you plan on applying soon I would wait until right before you plan on applying.
 

Mdhopeful0301

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Oct 20, 2017
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This is a really stupid question, but if someone never took the pre-reqs for med school, and just studied the MCAT/Kaplan science subject books inside-and-out, and learned everything from there, could he/she get a decent store on the MCAT?
Personally I think you need more than Kaplan or other prep books. For general and basic knowledge Khan Academy videos are great (they have MCAT video sections). But you definitely need to start using practice tests as well, like UWorld MCAT app. It’s very close to the real MCAT and is really helping me a lot
 

STcmOCSD

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Jan 29, 2017
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The Kaplan books and such are great at reminding you what you’ve already learned. They’ll teach you the high yield concepts, and you might be able to pull a median score out.

But to do get a score that I’d apply with? It’d be pretty difficult. I don’t think they’re sufficient at properly teaching you the material if you’ve never been exposed to it.
 

Sunbodi

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Just plain no. I'm being realistic here. It'd take you 3 years of self study that would take 1-2 years of in class work.

I am so happy I'll be done with all my prereqs before I take it because there's no way in hell I'd self study things like magnetism without an instructor to ask questions when I get lost in the reading.
 

YeaJeets2

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Just plain no. I'm being realistic here. It'd take you 3 years of self study that would take 1-2 years of in class work.

I am so happy I'll be done with all my prereqs before I take it because there's no way in hell I'd self study things like magnetism without an instructor to ask questions when I get lost in the reading.
Don't make sweeping generalizations for someone based on your own experience. While I think not taking basic bio and chem courses would put someone at a severe disadvantage, some people can self study very effectively. I have never taken biochem or any kind of psych or sociology class, and I had a very successful MCAT. I think it would take significantly less time to self study with a focus on high yield MCAT material than 1-2 years of class work. Doing it all in one semester though with little to no completed courses to build off of? I agree that's probably not realistic.
 
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It is definitely possible! I know a few people who self studied and did very well on the MCAT.

However, it did take them much longer than the average pre-med. And they used a consortium of test prep companies (Kaplan, EK and Khan Academy)
 
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Optimist Prime

2+ Year Member
Jun 23, 2015
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Just plain no. I'm being realistic here. It'd take you 3 years of self study that would take 1-2 years of in class work.

I am so happy I'll be done with all my prereqs before I take it because there's no way in hell I'd self study things like magnetism without an instructor to ask questions when I get lost in the reading.
Ya definitely not true. Some people are good at teaching themselves material. That's the only way I learn because I don't go to classes that don't have attendance.
 
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gonnif

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The MCAT, an exam that will set the course of the rest of your life, should be approached by being as best prepared as possible. Therefore students should over prepare by taking all the prereqs AND a prep class AND self study. To do so otherwise inserts risks into your eventual application to medical school that are wholly under your control.
 
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