MedicineN'Jazz

calling all jazzites
5+ Year Member
Apr 29, 2016
1,040
1,131
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
  2. Medical Student
Hey yall,
Has anyone here completed a MD/online MBA while in med school? I'm looking at one program that's less than $13K, only 10 courses with a duration of 7 weeks per class, fully accredited and was thinking of completing it in my fourth year. I have a very strong feeling this has been done by former medical students, and just wanted to hear past experiences if possible. Thanks!

-MedicineN'Jazz

P.S. I'd also like to add that name brand means nothing to me. I'm not trying to go into consulting with this degree, more so use it heavily in policy, research, and advocacy. I already have another graduate degree that would complement this one quite nicely.
 
Oct 8, 2016
140
108
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
I bet it can be done. I do think, though, that you'd miss out on a lot of what fourth year has to offer by doing an MBA at the same time. Fourth year is awesome. There are elective opportunities, away rotations, residency interviews, and one last chance to spend time with your classmates. You can always get an MBA. Personally, I wouldn't recommend sacrificing any aspects of medical school to get it right away.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

MedicineN'Jazz

calling all jazzites
5+ Year Member
Apr 29, 2016
1,040
1,131
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
  2. Medical Student
I bet it can be done. I do think, though, that you'd miss out on a lot of what fourth year has to offer by doing an MBA at the same time. Fourth year is awesome. There are elective opportunities, away rotations, residency interviews, and one last chance to spend time with your classmates. You can always get an MBA. Personally, I wouldn't recommend sacrificing any aspects of medical school to get it right away.
Yeah, I’ve thought about that tbh. But, I can get it done within 9 months, it doesn’t have to be all at once. It doesn’t hurt that I’ll have an extra 5 months for rotations (per our new curriculum). I may take only a single class during those electives. Besides that, do you see any other pros and cons.

I’d know it’d be technically more beneficial to wait. But I’m getting old, and would rather not go back to school after residency. I’m not sure my neuronal plasticity will be up to par :(
 
About the Ads
D

deleted497653

you'll barely see your classmates 4th year so don't let that stop you. Everyone will be trying to do aways or get their applications done for residency. If you haven't bonded with someone in your class by 4th year then its too late. But you should take your time with the MBA....nothing to be gained by rushing to finish it within 9 months....
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

premed_mamba

2+ Year Member
Mar 13, 2018
92
247
I have not done this yet but I have the exact same plan as you. We might even be talking about the same school. TAMCC?
 

MedicineN'Jazz

calling all jazzites
5+ Year Member
Apr 29, 2016
1,040
1,131
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
  2. Medical Student
I have not done this yet but I have the exact same plan as you. We might even be talking about the same school. TAMCC?
Haha that school was my first choice, but just saw that Fitchburg was much cheaper (no BS in business unfortunately). PM me, I’d love to connect with someone on a similar path!
 
7

751866

MBA quality often correlates with the brand name. Many MBA programs have terrible educational curricula, especially at no name schools. Some kind of reputation indicates at least one of the following: strong curriculum or strong networking. If you want an MBA only for knowledge make sure you investigate the program because many are jokes (vast majority). If it doesn't require a decent GMAT score to enter, probably a joke. If you talk with the business professors who teach other courses outside the MBA at that school and they say it's no good, then skip it. A vast majority of MBAs are jokes, so be careful what you spend your money on in this case.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

dpmgrad

Senior Member
15+ Year Member
May 17, 2005
793
61
Philadelphia
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
I would recommend looking into MBA programs that are accredited and avoid MBA programs that are not accredited. In the US, there are three agencies (AACSB, ACBSP, and IACBE) that business schools can gain accreditation from. Some feel that AACSB is the gold standard accreditation or carries more prestige. This is not to say that business schools that are accredited by the other two accreditation agencies are bad schools. However, the majority of (if not all) top 50 business schools (Univ of Penn Wharton, Harvard, Northwestern Kellogg, Univ of Chicago Booth, Columbia, MIT Sloan, Berkeley Haas, Univ of Michigan Ross, Cornell Johnson, Duke Fuqua, Dartmouth Tuck, Stanford, NYU Stern, etc...) are AACSB accredited. AACSB accreditation focuses on both research and teaching. ACBSP and IACBE accreditation mainly focus on teaching only. There are many affordable AACSB accredited programs, especially with the online MBA format.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

MedicineN'Jazz

calling all jazzites
5+ Year Member
Apr 29, 2016
1,040
1,131
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
  2. Medical Student
Thank you! The two that I’m considering are both accredited state schools. The more prestigious one/more well known is AACSB. However, it’s almost 5 grand more expensive than the other IACBE school.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users
Mar 16, 2010
196
129
Status (Visible)
  1. Pharmacist
Graduates of AACSB Accredited schools know how to check if applicants' schools are AACSB Accredited. AACSB Member is not the same as AACSB Accredited. Any school can become a Member simply by paying membership dues.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

dpmgrad

Senior Member
15+ Year Member
May 17, 2005
793
61
Philadelphia
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
Thank you! The two that I’m considering are both accredited state schools. The more prestigious one/more well known is AACSB. However, it’s almost 5 grand more expensive than the other IACBE school.

When evaluating the cost of the online MBA program, you need to also factor in, whether or not, you need to take additional prerequisite business coursework for those without an undergraduate degree in business. If the program requires you take prerequisite coursework, this would often add to the cost of online MBA program. For example, West Texas A&M program (AACSB accredited) would cost around 11K, if you don't need to take any prerequisite courses. If you don't have any business background, West Texas A&M may require you to take additional 9 to 21 credits of prerequisite coursework, which would raise the cost of the program to be around 18K (if one has take 21 additional credits). In addition, this would add to the length of time to complete the program due to additional coursework. On the hand, University of North Alabama program (AACSB accredited) program costs around 17K and does not require any prerequisite coursework, regardless of your undergraduate degree.
 
7

751866

Just as a general rule, if you're planning on the MBA helping you look more competitive, in no way should you pursue an online program. In the business world an MBA is generally only valuable for learning some basic basic business concepts and doing a ton of BS group projects unless it comes from a top ~20 or better program which has much higher educational standards and actually carries weight and provides connections.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2 users

MedicineN'Jazz

calling all jazzites
5+ Year Member
Apr 29, 2016
1,040
1,131
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
  2. Medical Student
Just as a general rule, if you're planning on the MBA helping you look more competitive, in no way should you pursue an online program. In the business world an MBA is generally only valuable for learning some basic basic business concepts and doing a ton of BS group projects unless it comes from a top ~20 or better program which has much higher educational standards and actually carries weight and provides connections.
Thanks for the advice! This is more for my personal benefit and my goals post-graduation. I’m kind of big on policy/ advocacy, and over the years, I’ve noticed that business (especially ones involving pharmaceutical and insurance companies), tend to play a huge role in unfair decision makings towards groups of people who can’t defend or advocate for themselves. So this MBA is to more to bridge the huge knowledge gaps I have between business and healthcare, learn how and why exactly business and medicine are so intricately intwined, and advocate for my patients so that slimy business-savy greedballs can’t outsmart me. Which is kind of what’s happening to our physicians today.

Plus, having an MBA lets the corporates know that not only do I mean business, I also know my business.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
About the Ads
7

751866

Thanks for the advice! This is more for my personal benefit and my goals post-graduation. I’m kind of big on policy/ advocacy, and over the years, I’ve noticed that business (especially ones involving pharmaceutical and insurance companies), tend to play a huge role in unfair decision makings towards groups of people who can’t defend or advocate for themselves. So this MBA is to more to bridge the huge knowledge gaps I have between business and healthcare, learn how and why exactly business and medicine are so intricately intwined, and advocate for my patients so that slimy business-savy greedballs can’t outsmart me. Which is kind of what’s happening to our physicians today.

Plus, having an MBA lets the corporates know that not only do I mean business, I also know my business.
I think then you should focus on making sure there is a good and and rigorous curriculum particularly in the accounting, finance, and econ courses (management and marketing are kind of self-explanatory and won't really be more than busy work in most places). Having some understanding of economics and finance will probably give some insight into why some (not all) drugs, for example, are priced "ridiculously" (and it's not necessarily greed, it's cost recovery for decades of R&D, a responsibility to shareholders to give a proper return on equity, and it's about subsidizing drugs which are very niche but don't help keep the lights on in a business, and that some pricing is "just because we want to"). I know in my class that there was a vast distinction between people without any business background and those with a business or econ background who understood some of the mechanisms behind pricing and how these "projects" work from the inside out; students without the background took the "the price is high therefore this is unjust" mentality where the students with the business background were able to think and understand whether the pricing was reasonable or not.

Having this knowledge will definitely help you in your goals and should also clarify that most "financial advisors" aren't worth obtaining (and they often don't know much). I would only consider paying a CPA or someone with a CFA charter depending on what I needed. So, you will get some personal benefit, too!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

MedicineN'Jazz

calling all jazzites
5+ Year Member
Apr 29, 2016
1,040
1,131
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
  2. Medical Student
I think then you should focus on making sure there is a good and and rigorous curriculum particularly in the accounting, finance, and econ courses (management and marketing are kind of self-explanatory and won't really be more than busy work in most places). Having some understanding of economics and finance will probably give some insight into why some (not all) drugs, for example, are priced "ridiculously" (and it's not necessarily greed, it's cost recovery for decades of R&D, a responsibility to shareholders to give a proper return on equity, and it's about subsidizing drugs which are very niche but don't help keep the lights on in a business, and that some pricing is "just because we want to"). I know in my class that there was a vast distinction between people without any business background and those with a business or econ background who understood some of the mechanisms behind pricing and how these "projects" work from the inside out; students without the background took the "the price is high therefore this is unjust" mentality where the students with the business background were able to think and understand whether the pricing was reasonable or not.

Having this knowledge will definitely help you in your goals and should also clarify that most "financial advisors" aren't worth obtaining (and they often don't know much). I would only consider paying a CPA or someone with a CFA charter depending on what I needed. So, you will get some personal benefit, too!
Thanks, this sounds like great advice. For my goals do you think it’d be best for me to get an MBA in accounting or an MBA in general management. Both have accounting, managing, and economic classes. The only difference is three courses dedicated to each “major”

Edit: There’s also an option at another school to do an MBA in healthcare. But it’s $10k more expensive
 
Last edited:

dpmgrad

Senior Member
15+ Year Member
May 17, 2005
793
61
Philadelphia
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
Thanks for the advice! This is more for my personal benefit and my goals post-graduation. I’m kind of big on policy/ advocacy, and over the years, I’ve noticed that business (especially ones involving pharmaceutical and insurance companies), tend to play a huge role in unfair decision makings towards groups of people who can’t defend or advocate for themselves. So this MBA is to more to bridge the huge knowledge gaps I have between business and healthcare, learn how and why exactly business and medicine are so intricately intwined, and advocate for my patients so that slimy business-savy greedballs can’t outsmart me. Which is kind of what’s happening to our physicians today.

Plus, having an MBA lets the corporates know that not only do I mean business, I also know my business.

In your situation, I would recommend pursing the MBA in healthcare. In the healthcare MBA, you will cover managerial accounting (and financial accounting in some MBA programs as well), marketing, strategy, economics, finance, organization behavior, etc... In addition, you will also cover healthcare policy and economics and other business related healthcare courses that would bridge the gap between business and healthcare. If you are looking for an accredited online MBA Program with healthcare focus that is relatively cheap, you should look at University of North Alabama online MBA program with Healthcare concentration, which is AACSB accredited and only costs a little over $17,000 for the entire program. The online MBA program with healthcare concentration that is very popular with physicians is the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, which costs a little over $36,000 for the entire program.

I am currently doing an Executive MBA program with healthcare focus. I chose executive MBA program over an online MBA program because of the in-person networking opportunities with my fellow classmates (whom are healthcare c-suite leaders, hospital administrators, work in insurance, med device, med tech, and pharma industries, investment banking in healthcare sector, fintech industry, and healthcare providers) and other students in other programs, which traditional online MBA program will not offer. My executive MBA program with healthcare concentration has the same identical core courses as the full time MBA and regular executive MBA. My program has additional healthcare related coursework.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 users

MedicineN'Jazz

calling all jazzites
5+ Year Member
Apr 29, 2016
1,040
1,131
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
  2. Medical Student
In your situation, I would recommend pursing the MBA in healthcare. In the healthcare MBA, you will cover managerial accounting (and financial accounting in some MBA programs as well), marketing, strategy, economics, finance, organization behavior, etc... In addition, you will also cover healthcare policy and economics and other business related healthcare courses that would bridge the gap between business and healthcare. If you are looking for an accredited online MBA Program with healthcare focus that is relatively cheap, you should look at University of North Alabama online MBA program with Healthcare concentration, which is AACSB accredited and only costs a little over $17,000 for the entire program. The online MBA program with healthcare concentration that is very popular with physicians is the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, which costs a little over $36,000 for the entire program.

I am currently doing an Executive MBA program with healthcare focus. I chose executive MBA program over an online MBA program because of the in-person networking opportunities with my fellow classmates (whom are healthcare c-suite leaders, hospital administrators, work in insurance, med device, med tech, and pharma industries, investment banking in healthcare sector, fintech industry, and healthcare providers) and other students in other programs, which traditional online MBA program will not offer. My executive MBA program with healthcare concentration has the same identical core courses as the full time MBA and regular executive MBA. My program has additional healthcare related coursework.
Amherst was actually the first program I looked at. But given the amount of free time I have in 4th year, I’d figured now vs. when my brain decays in residency would be a better time lol. I’ll go for the healthcare concentration then. Texas A&M has a really sweet program, and they’re also AACSB accredited. Thanks again for the advice! Really appreciate it
 
7

751866

Thanks, this sounds like great advice. For my goals do you think it’d be best for me to get an MBA in accounting or an MBA in general management. Both have accounting, managing, and economic classes. The only difference is three courses dedicated to each “major”

Edit: There’s also an option at another school to do an MBA in healthcare. But it’s $10k more expensive
One hundred percent accounting (or finance). We can PM if you'd like to see what specific courses are available and what might be worth looking into (I worked in finance prior to medical school). Management is usually a waste and less rigorous (like marketing). I wouldn't necessarily go for the MBA in healthcare without knowing more and if you want a basic business background I'm not sure how much it would help you above a regular MBA without knowing anything about the program itself.
 
7

751866

In your situation, I would recommend pursing the MBA in healthcare. In the healthcare MBA, you will cover managerial accounting (and financial accounting in some MBA programs as well), marketing, strategy, economics, finance, organization behavior, etc...
The financial and managerial accounting courses are essentially staples in a general accounting/business education (undergrad, and MBA programs cover this almost universally if they're not low quality). Even most business majors must take these regardless of whether they're finance, accounting, management and so on... Marketing is largely a waste and the whole "healthcare" spin seems like a cash grab since healthcare is hot right now (it's like "Data Science" or "Analytics" degrees bastardizing Statistics for the cash grab currently). People have been doing extremely well in healthcare with regular MBAs before anyone dreamed of the "healthcare" MBA. Not trying to knock your decision, but it likely wouldn't be worth the money as a general rule. Any specific program would be worth looking at, though.

In addition, you will also cover healthcare policy and economics and other business related healthcare courses that would bridge the gap between business and healthcare. If you are looking for an accredited online MBA Program with healthcare focus that is relatively cheap, you should look at University of North Alabama online MBA program with Healthcare concentration, which is AACSB accredited and only costs a little over $17,000 for the entire program. The online MBA program with healthcare concentration that is very popular with phy$ician$ is the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, which costs a little over $36,000 for the entire program.
This is precisely my point. I don't think the extra course or two (which OP may be able to take as an elective, but won't be the end of the world if not) don't justify the extra cash and possibly watered down courses (which are already watered down in many MBA programs); if the healthcare MBA puts you in most of the same courses, then you're doubly screwed to pay more for the same courses sans 1-2 electives.

I am currently doing an Executive MBA program with healthcare focus. I chose executive MBA program over an online MBA program because of the in-person networking opportunities with my fellow classmates (whom are healthcare c-suite leaders, hospital administrators, work in insurance, med device, med tech, and pharma industries, investment banking in healthcare sector, fintech industry, and healthcare providers) and other students in other programs, which traditional online MBA program will not offer. My executive MBA program with healthcare concentration has the same identical core courses as the full time MBA and regular executive MBA. My program has additional healthcare related coursework.
I definitely agree in person would be best in case there are networking opportunities even though the OP just wants a good education (and networking generally isn't worth the price tag outside of top programs). Now, that I finished reading your post, I can see you do take the same core courses, which is good, but I think it would be hard to justify an extra price tag depending on the typical graduates of the program.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

MedicineN'Jazz

calling all jazzites
5+ Year Member
Apr 29, 2016
1,040
1,131
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
  2. Medical Student
One hundred percent accounting (or finance). We can PM if you'd like to see what specific courses are available and what might be worth looking into (I worked in finance prior to medical school). Management is usually a waste and less rigorous (like marketing). I wouldn't necessarily go for the MBA in healthcare without knowing more and if you want a basic business background I'm not sure how much it would help you above a regular MBA without knowing anything about the program itself.
Hmmm very interesting take. I’ll definitely be PMing you
 

dpmgrad

Senior Member
15+ Year Member
May 17, 2005
793
61
Philadelphia
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
The financial and managerial accounting courses are essentially staples in a general accounting/business education (undergrad, and MBA programs cover this almost universally if they're not low quality). Even most business majors must take these regardless of whether they're finance, accounting, management and so on... Marketing is largely a waste and the whole "healthcare" spin seems like a cash grab since healthcare is hot right now (it's like "Data Science" or "Analytics" degrees bastardizing Statistics for the cash grab currently). People have been doing extremely well in healthcare with regular MBAs before anyone dreamed of the "healthcare" MBA. Not trying to knock your decision, but it likely wouldn't be worth the money as a general rule. Any specific program would be worth looking at, though.

This is precisely my point. I don't think the extra course or two (which OP may be able to take as an elective, but won't be the end of the world if not) don't justify the extra cash and possibly watered down courses (which are already watered down in many MBA programs); if the healthcare MBA puts you in most of the same courses, then you're doubly screwed to pay more for the same courses sans 1-2 electives.

I definitely agree in person would be best in case there are networking opportunities even though the OP just wants a good education (and networking generally isn't worth the price tag outside of top programs). Now, that I finished reading your post, I can see you do take the same core courses, which is good, but I think it would be hard to justify an extra price tag depending on the typical graduates of the program.

I do agree with some of your points that you have stated. I think that OP really needs to figure out what he/she wants to do with the MBA degree. For example, if the OP hopes to pivot into finance industry (such as IB) after residency, the online MBA with finance concentration will not be helpful since OP has no experience in the finance industry (which you have). If OP wants to pivots into IB, the OP should complete a full time MBA program, where the OP has the opportunity to do that extremely valuable internship between the first and second year. If OP knows what he/she wants to do with the MBA degree, then the OP should choose MBA concentration that will support that decision.

As for healthcare MBA, I think that you are confused as to what a healthcare MBA program is. Yes, there are a few healthcare MBA program, where they modify the curriculum to put healthcare spin on most of the core course work, which I am assuming you were referring to in regards to watered down courses. However, majority of the healthcare MBA programs are just regular MBA programs with healthcare concentration, where the MBA students take the same MBA core courses like everyone else and take two or three healthcare related business courses for their electives. If you look at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and University of North Alabama online MBA programs with healthcare concentration, those MBA students take exactly the same core MBA courses like any other MBA students in other concentrations (such as finance). The only difference is the elective coursework, where the healthcare concentration students will take electives in the healthcare realm.

In your posting, it appears that you saying that a student has to pay more for the healthcare MBA. The students in the healthcare MBA should pay the same exact tuition as a regular MBA student with accounting or finance concentration at the same institution.

As for me, my goal for the MBA is to stay in the healthcare/pharma/med tech/med device/insurance/health IT industry in the capacity of c-suite leadership, consulting, or venture management. Hence, MBA program with healthcare focus made the most sense for me. EMBA program also made the most sense for me since it allows me to network and also allow me to complete all of my classwork in 2 years of less and still work full time as a clinician. I am enrolled in one of the EMBA programs with healthcare focus at one of the top 20 business schools. As i said in previous post, I take the same core MBA courses (no healthcare spin or watered down versions) as the regular full time MBA and the other EMBA programs at my institution. The remainder of my curriculum consists of healthcare related coursework and other upper level MBA coursework. In my program, I still have the opportunity to take electives outside of healthcare, such as Mergers and Acquisition and Venture Management.

Some of the EMBA programs that offers a healthcare focus / concentration options at top 20 business schools include Yale (MBA for executive with healthcare focus option), Columbia (EMBA program via Healthcare and Pharmaceutical Management Program), Cornell (EMBA / MS in Healthcare Leadership), and Duke (Weekend EMBA program with Health Sector Management Certificate). Students in these programs take the same common core MBA courses as the other MBA students with NO healthcare spin on those coursework.
 
Last edited:
7

751866

I do agree with some of your points that you have stated. I think that OP really needs to figure out what he/she wants to do with the MBA degree. For example, if the OP hopes to pivot into finance industry (such as IB) after residency, the online MBA with finance concentration will not be helpful since OP has no experience in the finance industry (which you have). If OP wants to pivots into IB, the OP should complete a full time MBA program, where the OP has the opportunity to do that extremely valuable internship between the first and second year. If OP knows what he/she wants to do with the MBA degree, then the OP should choose MBA concentration that will support that decision.
Largely agree and if OP wants to "get into finance", the top program names you mentioned later are going to be key and the in person networking will be king because those top programs are well connected.

As for healthcare MBA, I think that you are confused as to what a healthcare MBA program is.
I wouldn't necessarily say I'm confused as I acknowledge it really depends on the specific program. But, I have seen firsthand there are "healthcare" tracks where the courses are watered down vs different experiences or project requirements/seminars compared to the general MBA. So, I think looking at the program specifically is important.



In your posting, it appears that you saying that a student has to pay more for the healthcare MBA. The students in the healthcare MBA should pay the same exact tuition as a regular MBA student with accounting or finance concentration at the same institution.
Again, it depends on the program if the costs are the same, but I think the OP said earlier it would cost more if the healthcare concentration was pursued. Without knowing more (top 10 program, in person program, OP wants to get connections over top of education, for example) you can't really justify the cost that many programs charge for "enhanced networking" or "tailored curriculum" in "hot" areas like health care or "analytics" (sham), for example.

As for me, my goal for the MBA is to stay in the healthcare/pharma/med tech/med device/insurance/health IT industry in the capacity of c-suite leadership, consulting, or venture management. Hence, MBA program with healthcare focus made the most sense for me. EMBA program also made the most sense for me since it allows me to network and also allow me to complete all of my classwork in 2 years of less and still work full time as a clinician. I am enrolled in one of the EMBA programs with healthcare focus at one of the top 20 business schools. As i said in previous post, I take the same core MBA courses (no healthcare spin or watered down versions) as the regular full time MBA and the other EMBA programs at my institution. The remainder of my curriculum consists of healthcare related coursework and other upper level MBA coursework. In my program, I still have the opportunity to take electives outside of healthcare, such as Mergers and Acquisition and Venture Management.

Some of the EMBA programs that offers a healthcare focus / concentration options at top 20 business schools include Yale (MBA for executive with healthcare focus option), Columbia (EMBA program via Healthcare and Pharmaceutical Management Program), Cornell (EMBA / MS in Healthcare Leadership), and Duke (Weekend EMBA program with Health Sector Management Certificate). Students in these programs take the same common core MBA courses as the other MBA students with NO healthcare spin on those coursework.
I think this sounds like a great fit for you (which, makes sense because you chose it). The networking you get from the in person courses at a top program will be very helpful. I think the OP (and future readers) do need to be careful because in general, many of these "tailored" programs are cash grabs that capitalize on the trends.
 

ArdorAyurveda

Credit goes to Google Images
2+ Year Member
Mar 15, 2019
200
146
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Why not just take on a healthcare administration project while you are in residency, and then do an executive MBA? You'll have clinical and business experience, and you'll have a better idea of why you're doing the MBA in the first place. The value of the MBA is in the network, not in the course content.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

MedicineN'Jazz

calling all jazzites
5+ Year Member
Apr 29, 2016
1,040
1,131
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
  2. Medical Student
Why not just take on a healthcare administration project while you are in residency, and then do an executive MBA? You'll have clinical and business experience, and you'll have a better idea of why you're doing the MBA in the first place. The value of the MBA is in the network, not in the course content.
I might end up doing that for financial reasons. Can you explain that to me a bit more though? Do you mean enrolling part-time in my residency’s MBA program as a PGY-5, and then going full time once I finish?
 

ArdorAyurveda

Credit goes to Google Images
2+ Year Member
Mar 15, 2019
200
146
Status (Visible)
  1. Medical Student
Depends on what you what, but I meant finishing residency, practicing as an attending for a few years, and then getting an administrative role as a medical director...and THEN going to get your MBA. Your company might even pay for it, too.
 

MedicineN'Jazz

calling all jazzites
5+ Year Member
Apr 29, 2016
1,040
1,131
Status (Visible)
  1. Pre-Medical
  2. Medical Student
Depends on what you what, but I meant finishing residency, practicing as an attending for a few years, and then getting an administrative role as a medical director...and THEN going to get your MBA. Your company might even pay for it, too.
Yikes, I 100% do not want to go into administration. The MBA is for me
 

dpmgrad

Senior Member
15+ Year Member
May 17, 2005
793
61
Philadelphia
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
Yikes, I 100% do not want to go into administration. The MBA is for me

I think that we (AndorAyurveda, delimitedtab, and I) are all asking you, "what do you intend to do with your MBA degree?" In this posting you mentioned that you do not want to go into healthcare upper management / administration (C-suite level). This would mean that MBA with healthcare concentration or a physician based EMBA program may not be the best fit for you. If you are hoping to pivot out of medicine into finance sector (such as Investment Banking, etc...) with your MBA degree, then you should probably consider a full time MBA program, where you can do that important internship in the finance sector since you don't have any finance experience, unlike delimitedtab. I know of two MDs that have pivoted from medicine into investment banking (healthcare sector) and both of them went back for full time MBA (one went to Wharton and the other went to HBS). If you are not sure what you want to do with your MBA, I would recommend that you should not waste your time and money on doing an online MBA program now. You can always go back to the online MBA or executive MBA (EMBA) at a later time once you know what you want to do with the MBA degree.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
7

751866

I'll say that if the OP just wants some basic business background, either some undergraduate accounting, finance, and econ courses would be useful or an MBA with a good curriculum, whether online or not, but other people might not be impressed by a no name online MBA where you built no contacts.
 

dpmgrad

Senior Member
15+ Year Member
May 17, 2005
793
61
Philadelphia
Status (Visible)
  1. Attending Physician
I'll say that if the OP just wants some basic business background, either some undergraduate accounting, finance, and econ courses would be useful or an MBA with a good curriculum, whether online or not, but other people might not be impressed by a no name online MBA where you built no contacts.

As you had mentioned in the past, one of the reasons of enrolling in MBA is for the networking with fellow classmates, alumni, and other school connections. I agree that this is one of major benefits of an established MBA program with significant networking resources. In my EMBA program at one of the top 20 business school, I have had the chance to network with c-suite people in pharma, JP Morgan (who is working on connecting me with some of the people involved with Amazon/JP Morgan/Berkshire Hathaway joint venture Haven), Verily (formerly Google's Life Science division) and major healthcare consulting firms (such as BCG, Bain, etc...)
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
About the Ads
This thread is more than 2 years old.

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.