MD MD vs DO from MD perspective

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Placebo Power

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I am just curious
What is covered in MD school that is not covered in DO school?

I tried looking online and on YouTube but every time I look up this question the answer is always from a DO perspective where they say they learn medicine from a holistic approach but also learn body manipulation.

The question I have is
What classes are taught in MD school that are not taught in DO school.

Naturally it doesn’t make sense for two programs to take the same amount of time to finish, yet one of the programs teaches everything and more compared to the other program
 

MrChance2

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It’s a hard question to answer because nobody has really done both. I’d say most USMD schools are just better organised with better standards in general for teaching.

First and second year nobody went to lecture. Which is pretty standard for both. We had some good teachers and some bad ones. 1st year was taught by mostly by PhDs and second year was taught by a mix of DOs and MDs

Most of my rotations as a DO didn’t have residents. There are no formal didactics 3rd or 4th year. Some preceptors teach. Some don’t even try. Some don’t make you show up at all. We are forced to do ~10 months of primary care called one thing or another (rural medicine, geriatrics, FM, peds, etc)

That’s not to say DOs graduate as worse doctors but the quality of education is not as good generally and it depends on the individual. I did some rotations with Caribbean MDs and DO School is still >>>>> than that.

I’ve never had a USMD Bring up a concept that I’m just completely unfamiliar with. Possibly some newer treatments that just came out in the past 5 years but there doesn’t seem to be a difference in material taught. Most DOs pass USMLE. In my view we just waste more time with some bad and unregulated rotations. Also most of us have never had an individual conversation with our dean. I think USMDs in general get more support. We also learn OMM which 90%+ of us never use professionally.
 
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mcloaf

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We are forced to do ~10 months of primary care called one thing or another (rural medicine, geriatrics, FM, peds, etc)

Wow I had no idea about that, ouch.
 
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HappiDoctor

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We have didactics with the MD students in 3rd year.
I'd say that med school is really what you make of it. You can ask both DO and MD med students about the quality of education from their perspective and some will say it is good and others not so good. I've taken classes at both USMD and DO medical schools and as far as the education goes, I'd say it basically is the same (other than the added OMM). OMM is placed into the curriculum throughout "mostly" the first 3 years. Whether you choose to use OMM after graduation depends on what field of medicine you go into AND your preference.
 
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Goro

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I am just curious
What is covered in MD school that is not covered in DO school?

I tried looking online and on YouTube but every time I look up this question the answer is always from a DO perspective where they say they learn medicine from a holistic approach but also learn body manipulation.

The question I have is
What classes are taught in MD school that are not taught in DO school.

Naturally it doesn’t make sense for two programs to take the same amount of time to finish, yet one of the programs teaches everything and more compared to the other program
Having been on Faculty at both types of schools, the students get the same thing, but in different flavors. The stuff of what doctors do seems to be more hands on that from the MD school I saw (but that was also some 20 years ago). Basic science stuff will be the same, but based upon the complaints I see on SDN, at MD schools research faculty sure seem to teach a lot more stuff about their own research, and less what med students actually need to know.
 
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HappiDoctor

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I agree with what Goro said above and to elaborate, professors at MD schools, who do research, enjoy teaching topics related to their own research because that's what they are passionate about. Then again, that's human nature...
At my DO medical school, the first 2 years also included training on interviewing patients and practicing clinical skills on standardized patients. We were evaluated on our interviewing skills (H&P) by standardized patients and faculty during the first 2 years. This was integrated into the curriculum. I.e. if we were on cardiology we would go through OSCE style encounters with standardized patients who presented with symptoms related to cardio disorders.
I know more DO schools that do this than MD schools and I think it prepared students well for rotations. It doesn't seem like too many MD schools do this.
 
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libertyyne

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DO students get everything MD students get plus OMM.
DO rotations on average are poorer quality compared to MD.
DO students on average have less access to research
MD students on average tend to have access to more home residency programs
MD students on average probably have access to more diverse patient populations considering a good portion of DO schools are in very rural areas.
MD schools on average have higher STEP I scores.
MD students have an easier time matching into competitive MD residencies.

The holistic BS is nonsense propoganda.

Everything and more would be true if you consider OMM useful, otherwise it is just more useless information thrown at you.
 
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Donald Juan

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Like said above, no ones really gone through a complete curriculum of both programs, and individual programs differ. At my MD school we were taught to treat people's problems as the isolated pathology as a part of a single organ system that it is. Also, you should always think of your patients as potential guinea pigs that could become data points in a first author pub that could boost your career.

I've heard DOs try to consider the patient as a whole human being (so-called "holistic" approach). This is much more in line with what nurse practitioners learn, and explains why MDs are more likely to get into competitive subspecialties vs primary care.
 
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NotYou20

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Wow I had no idea about that, ouch.
fwiw my DO school isn't like that; our rotation schedule is similar to what my friends at MD schools have. We also have didactics, but I'm not sure how often. I remember applying to both MD and DO schools that had tons of time spent on primary care
 
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libertyyne

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Like said above, no ones really gone through a complete curriculum of both programs, and individual programs differ. At my MD school we were taught to treat people's problems as the isolated pathology as a part of a single organ system that it is. Also, you should always think of your patients as potential guinea pigs that could become data points in a first author pub that could boost your career.

I've heard DOs try to consider the patient as a whole human being (so-called "holistic" approach). This is much more in line with what nurse practitioners learn, and explains why MDs are more likely to get into competitive subspecialties vs primary care.
lol.
 
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FrkyBgStok

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As a DO resident teaching both DO and MD medical students, i would say the above is generally true, but which is better? In my experience, MD students on average seem more awkward, younger, and more of the traditional student that has never had a job. Many of the DO med students I've worked with are excellent with patients, can apply themselves clinically, and are socially aware of their surroundings. In my specialty, this goes further than high board scores.

I have also seen really good MDs and really bad DOs where the roles are flipped.
 
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Lnsean

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As a DO resident teaching both DO and MD medical students, i would say the above is generally true, but which is better? In my experience, MD students on average seem more awkward, younger, and more of the traditional student that has never had a job. Many of the DO med students I've worked with are excellent with patients, can apply themselves clinically, and are socially aware of their surroundings. In my specialty, this goes further than high board scores.

I have also seen really good MDs and really bad DOs where the roles are flipped.

What I have noticed is that MDs rarely come on to trash DOs, but I always see DOs trashing MDs. It is unprofessional and speaks volume to the kind of insecurity that is inherent in the people that do this.
 
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Donald Juan

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What I have noticed is that MDs rarely come on to trash DOs, but I always see DOs trashing MDs. It is unprofessional and speaks volume to the kind of insecurity that is inherent in the people that do this.
Wait a minute, are you implying that lower board scores and MCAT doesn't mean you are inherently a more caring individual who has more people skills and is more personable? Or that everyone with solid testing abilities isn't a socially awkward nerd who has never had a job before and is extremely immature?
 
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Dwan

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I agree with what Goro said above and to elaborate, professors at MD schools, who do research, enjoy teaching topics related to their own research because that's what they are passionate about. Then again, that's human nature...
At my DO medical school, the first 2 years also included training on interviewing patients and practicing clinical skills on standardized patients. We were evaluated on our interviewing skills (H&P) by standardized patients and faculty during the first 2 years. This was integrated into the curriculum. I.e. if we were on cardiology we would go through OSCE style encounters with standardized patients who presented with symptoms related to cardio disorders.
I know more DO schools that do this than MD schools and I think it prepared students well for rotations. It doesn't seem like too many MD schools do this.

My MD school had this plus we would see and interview real patients with cardio disorders as well, during the block. Every school will hype that their clinical curriculum is unique, but 99% of the time it is not. MD schools on average have more resources both for research and clinical just due to the size and funding of the affiliated hospitals. Good clinical grades (honors, AOA) from M3 are also much more respected when coming from an MD school vs DO when applying to residencies, whether fair or not, because the clinical sites are better known for their rigor.
 
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Lnsean

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Wait a minute, are you implying that lower board scores and MCAT doesn't mean you are inherently a more caring individual who has more people skills and is more personable? Or that everyone with solid testing abilities isn't a socially awkward nerd who has never had a job before and is extremely immature?

See this is exactly the attitude I'm talking about. What's with this lack of professionalism? All it does is makes you look worst. Here's more objective data that is not riddled with emotions:

From AACOMAS:

https://www.aacom.org/docs/default-...riculant-profile-summary-report.pdf?sfvrsn=10

From AAMC:

https://www.aamc.org/download/321468/data/factstablea6.pdf

Same average age of 24 for matriculants
 
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Dwan

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As a DO resident teaching both DO and MD medical students, i would say the above is generally true, but which is better? In my experience, MD students on average seem more awkward, younger, and more of the traditional student that has never had a job. Many of the DO med students I've worked with are excellent with patients, can apply themselves clinically, and are socially aware of their surroundings. In my specialty, this goes further than high board scores.

I have also seen really good MDs and really bad DOs where the roles are flipped.

Those who spend their time generalizing that stronger applicants (people who got into more competitive schools/fields etc than them) are more awkward and out of touch, are usually awkward themselves.
 

Chibucks15

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What I have noticed is that MDs rarely come on to trash DOs, but I always see DOs trashing MDs. It is unprofessional and speaks volume to the kind of insecurity that is inherent in the people that do this.
You should check out the DO boards...i havent seen many DOs attack MDs but theres always at least 1-2 MD (well probably more pre-MDs) that come on to trash DOs and talk down. Talking down one or the other gets you absolutely nowhere but I do agree it shows the lack of maturity and self-absorbed nature of some. I'm a DO student, happy to be one, couldn't care less if an MD is better than me. I'll be a doc regardless so who really cares in the end unless you're trying to climb the ivory tower. Every hospital I've worked in patients, nurses, and others didn't know the difference and the docs themselves didn't care at all. It's really less of an issue than people make it out to be on here
 
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Donald Juan

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NotYou20

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Wait a minute, are you implying that lower board scores and MCAT doesn't mean you are inherently a more caring individual who has more people skills and is more personable? Or that everyone with solid testing abilities isn't a socially awkward nerd who has never had a job before and is extremely immature?
You both forgot that md students are all kissesless virgins too smdh
 
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HappiDoctor

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Comments on here have become unprofessional.. At the end of the day DOs and MDs have equivalent rights and privileges and work together. There no point in making tasteless comments
 
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sliceofbread136

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It’s more what you don’t have to deal with. No omm, comlex, crappy clinicals, in general higher tuition, some extent of stigma and a harder time matching in super prestigious spots
 
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Atom612

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Another MD vs. DO thread, you say?

vAAGbNi.jpg
 
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SouthernSurgeon

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I agree with what Goro said above and to elaborate, professors at MD schools, who do research, enjoy teaching topics related to their own research because that's what they are passionate about. Then again, that's human nature...
At my DO medical school, the first 2 years also included training on interviewing patients and practicing clinical skills on standardized patients. We were evaluated on our interviewing skills (H&P) by standardized patients and faculty during the first 2 years. This was integrated into the curriculum. I.e. if we were on cardiology we would go through OSCE style encounters with standardized patients who presented with symptoms related to cardio disorders.
I know more DO schools that do this than MD schools and I think it prepared students well for rotations. It doesn't seem like too many MD schools do this.

That’s absolutely not true. Every Md school I’ve ever seen has a well structured pre-clinical course on the patient interview and physical exam.
 
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Rekt

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See this is exactly the attitude I'm talking about. What's with this lack of professionalism? All it does is makes you look worst. Here's more objective data that is not riddled with emotions:

From AACOMAS:

https://www.aacom.org/docs/default-...riculant-profile-summary-report.pdf?sfvrsn=10

From AAMC:

https://www.aamc.org/download/321468/data/factstablea6.pdf

Same average age of 24 for matriculants

Bro you're getting trolled.

Also, you're an idiot. DOs don't trash MDs. Go back to the Pharm forums
 
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Goro

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Another MD vs. DO thread, you say?

vAAGbNi.jpg
URM threads are that way -->
Midlevels R taking R jobs! threads are down the hall in the Kyoto Room
Med school needs to be shorter threads are in the Grand Ballroom
Carib threads are in the Toledo Room
Will keep this me out of medical school? threads are in the Bel Air Room
Looking for advice and angrily rejecting anything I don't want to hear threads are out in left field.
SDN is too conservative threads are down the hall to the left
SDN is too liberal threads are down the hall to the right

I think we're covered now.
 
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Lnsean

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Bro you're getting trolled.

Also, you're an idiot. DOs don't trash MDs. Go back to the Pharm forums
I'm an M1 lol...and what's with all the anger?
Jesus, talk about insecurity.
 
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QueenJames

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This thread was totally unnecessary.

From my experience, it's not about MD vs. DO.

It's just about douchebags vs. non-douchebags.

I've met chill MD students. I've met chill DOs.

OTOH... I've also met VERY insecure students in both schools.

Obviously, there are outliers, but these are just from MY experience.

The rest....

well...

They are probably in the Caribbean somewhere lolz
 
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hurtem&healem

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Cheese and Rice... 30 posts in and it doesn't appear anybody actually read the OP. Let's try it this way:

MD and DO schools both have two years of preclinical education, yet DO schools (for better or worse) have a 200hr time sink that MD schools do not. Is there anything during the MD preclinical years which makes up this time, or do MD students just have 200 extra "free" hours in comparison?


FWIW, many (some? idk the stats) MD schools are moving to an 18 month preclinical model. That may give us our answer right there.
 
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Stagg737

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I am just curious
What is covered in MD school that is not covered in DO school?

I tried looking online and on YouTube but every time I look up this question the answer is always from a DO perspective where they say they learn medicine from a holistic approach but also learn body manipulation.

The question I have is
What classes are taught in MD school that are not taught in DO school.

Naturally it doesn’t make sense for two programs to take the same amount of time to finish, yet one of the programs teaches everything and more compared to the other program

The short answer is nothing. The required curriculum is the same, but DOs also have to learn OMM.

Longer answers have been given, the only thing I'd say is that different schools have "unique" classes that other schools don't have. From my experience most of these classes are the same as all the other "unique" classes, but just teach the same thing in a different way.

It’s a hard question to answer because nobody has really done both. I’d say most USMD schools are just better organised with better standards in general for teaching.

First and second year nobody went to lecture. Which is pretty standard for both. We had some good teachers and some bad ones. 1st year was taught by mostly by PhDs and second year was taught by a mix of DOs and MDs

Most of my rotations as a DO didn’t have residents. There are no formal didactics 3rd or 4th year. Some preceptors teach. Some don’t even try. Some don’t make you show up at all. We are forced to do ~10 months of primary care called one thing or another (rural medicine, geriatrics, FM, peds, etc)

That’s not to say DOs graduate as worse doctors but the quality of education is not as good generally and it depends on the individual. I did some rotations with Caribbean MDs and DO School is still >>>>> than that.

I’ve never had a USMD Bring up a concept that I’m just completely unfamiliar with. Possibly some newer treatments that just came out in the past 5 years but there doesn’t seem to be a difference in material taught. Most DOs pass USMLE. In my view we just waste more time with some bad and unregulated rotations. Also most of us have never had an individual conversation with our dean. I think USMDs in general get more support. We also learn OMM which 90%+ of us never use professionally.

10 months of Primary? That sounds awful. I'm at a DO school and your clinical years sound completely different in that aspect, the rest sounds pretty similar though (variation in attendings and quality of rotations, minimal/lack of formal didactics, hit or miss in terms of rotations with residents, etc).

I'll also back up the only things MD students have talked about that I didn't really know about was research the specific professor who taught them was doing, and MD students from other schools in the conversation didn't know that either, so it's a school to school difference, not a difference between degrees.

DO students get everything MD students get plus OMM.
DO rotations on average are poorer quality compared to MD.
DO students on average have less access to research
MD students on average tend to have access to more home residency programs
MD students on average probably have access to more diverse patient populations considering a good portion of DO schools are in very rural areas.
MD schools on average have higher STEP I scores.
MD students have an easier time matching into competitive MD residencies.

The holistic BS is nonsense propoganda.

Everything and more would be true if you consider OMM useful, otherwise it is just more useless information thrown at you.

I think this is pretty spot on other than the DO schools being in rural areas thing. I think most are actually in urban/suburban areas, but there may be a slightly higher percent in rural areas than MD schools. I think the difference in patient diversity is more likely due to the fact that most MD programs have teaching hospitals they rotate through, meaning they'll likely see a wider variety of cases. This is less common on the DO side. For example, one of my IM rotations was at a 40 bed hospital and I can count the number of cases for that month that weren't HTN/CHF/DM management on my fingers.
 

libertyyne

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Cheese and Rice... 30 posts in and it doesn't appear anybody actually read the OP. Let's try it this way:

MD and DO schools both have two years of preclinical education, yet DO schools (for better or worse) have a 200hr time sink that MD schools do not. Is there anything during the MD preclinical years which makes up this time, or do MD students just have 200 extra "free" hours in comparison?


FWIW, many (some? idk the stats) MD schools are moving to an 18 month preclinical model. That may give us our answer right there.
MD schools do not have an OMM equivalent. There are school specific time sucks like population/ public health, research requirements, Mandatory volunteering/societal improvement committments. Most MD students probably use the additional time to study more, do more research, or just take it easy.
 
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Datypicalpremed

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Worked with plenty of DOs and MDs here. Haven't noticed any difference in how they practice or teach (dunno if residency accounts for this). If anything, I've noticed the DOs tend to be nicer, chiller and, most importantly, give better evals. Hence why I shamelessly try to get assigned to them on my rotations:whistle:
 
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FourniersGreenGang

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There is not a difference besides omm and increased research opportunities. There are so many different quality schools of both types that a meaningful comparison is pointless beyond those generalities. At my DO school, my rotations are at a very large urban academic teaching hospital with a level 1 trauma center and plenty of research opportunities. Not the same at all schools. Certain newer MD schools have far worse rotations than that. Ultimately there is very little difference between the two schooling types. If there was a large discrepancy, we would not be trusted with treating the public. Any DO I know would never dream of trash talking MDs (except the weird zealot type) and any MD I know who has actually worked with DOs wouldnt dream of trashing them. We are the same profession under two different degrees. We work very well together and the degree generally doesn't matter in the real world (in my experience working with both MDs and DOs). It matters to premeds and a few old school docs on both sides.
 
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Lnsean

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That explains the premed fallic tape measuring mentality right there.

Wow, your colleague was bashing MDs and I merely told him he was unprofessional. Unreal that this kind of behavior is tolerated for you guys.
 
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68PGunner

Wow, your colleague was bashing MDs and I merely told him he was unprofessional. Unreal that this kind of behavior is tolerated for you guys.

There's a difference between bashing vs stating his opinion due to personal exp. In fact, the guy even concedes that there're good and bad physicians from both aisles.

I don't even see anything wrong with his original post before you come in here gun blazing with your rant.
 

Chibucks15

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You get DOs responding because it was asserted that DOs are bashing MDs which doesn't happen unless you're a premed. And most MDs dont bash DOs unless you're a premed. Its literally the same profession lets focus this ire on NPs and the usual suspects not each other cmon now

EDIT: It wasnt the initial posts that asserted the bashing but later on it morphed that way, which brings in the DOs
 
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SouthernSurgeon

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There is not a difference besides omm and increased research opportunities. There are so many different quality schools of both types that a meaningful comparison is pointless beyond those generalities. At my DO school, my rotations are at a very large urban academic teaching hospital with a level 1 trauma center and plenty of research opportunities. Not the same at all schools. Certain newer MD schools have far worse rotations than that. Ultimately there is very little difference between the two schooling types. If there was a large discrepancy, we would not be trusted with treating the public. Any DO I know would never dream of trash talking MDs (except the weird zealot type) and any MD I know who has actually worked with DOs wouldnt dream of trashing them. We are the same profession under two different degrees. We work very well together and the degree generally doesn't matter in the real world (in my experience working with both MDs and DOs). It matters to premeds and a few old school docs on both sides.

Also not true. The new Md schools that have opened up, with the possible exception of that joke of a for profit school in CA, tend to have very good clinical affiliations - for example the Beaumont med school in Michigan which is affiliated with the biggest hospital system in the state.

They also tend to start their classes out very small (the exact opposite of new DO schools) in order to ensure adequate access to rotations, then grow over time.
 
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mcloaf

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I mean, if you count all of the primary care specialties (IM, peds, FM, possibly OBGYN) that's not too far off from what MD students do either.

Maybe, but I wouldn't consider something like working on an inpatient GI service as primary care. Even the outpatient IM I did was nearly all highly subspecialized except for a couple clinics I rotated through, same for outpatient peds though to a lesser extent. I'd estimate my true outpatient primary care time was 1 to 2 months, which felt adequate to me.
 

aafisahar

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unpopular opinion, but from a PGY2 in a low-mid tier IM residency.

DOs aren't as well trained in medical school as MD students. I've worked with a few interns now, and the ones from DO schools have anemic differentials (eg AKI can only be from hypovoluemia, no sense of when to cover for pseudomonas, can't work up pancytopenia properly prior to calling heme/onc; OTOH, MD interns knew the answers to all these questions), less well-thought out plans (eg can't give more than 40mg lasix by IV because of ototoxicity [so I guess we don't diurese this patient?....]), don't know the literature as well, and can't explain the pathophysiology as well as their MD counterparts. This isn't apples to oranges since they are all incoming interns.
 
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deleted274002

Also not true. The new Md schools that have opened up, with the possible exception of that joke of a for profit school in CA, tend to have very good clinical affiliations - for example the Beaumont med school in Michigan which is affiliated with the biggest hospital system in the state.

They also tend to start their classes out very small (the exact opposite of new DO schools) in order to ensure adequate access to rotations, then grow over time.

Can vouch for this. Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine (full disclosure, I did not go here) got its name from the long established hospital system here. Before OU's medical school came along, students from Wayne State and the University of Michigan (and Michigan State maybe?) would regularly rotate there. In fact, my medical school class was the first class to not be allowed to do so in our third year because those spots now belonged to OUWB students. Not that I cared really; I rotated at exactly the places I wanted to. Anecdotally, care is some of the best in the state (although rumor has it the teaching leaves a little to be desired, but that's gossip so take it with a huge grain of salt).
 
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Scrubs101

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Can vouch for this. Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine (full disclosure, I did not go here) got its name from the long established hospital system here. Before OU's medical school came along, students from Wayne State and the University of Michigan (and Michigan State maybe?) would regularly rotate there. In fact, my medical school class was the first class to not be allowed to do so in our third year because those spots now belonged to OUWB students. Not that I cared really; I rotated at exactly the places I wanted to. Anecdotally, care is some of the best in the state (although rumor has it the teaching leaves a little to be desired, but that's gossip so take it with a huge grain of salt).

Can speak for MSU, i believe we can (maybe used to now, not entirely sure if it changed) do rotations at royal oak beaumont. We also have several hundred residency spots (OPTI) at two major hospitals now within the beaumont system, oakwood, troy, and botsford(which is now beaumont farmington hills).

Edit: seems we no longer have the royal oak option anymore either
Edit edit: should probably also add that yeah, i agree i’d say Beaumont (Royal Oak) is easily the #2 hospital in the state behind U of M, at least in terms of public opinion from where I’m from.

I know you’re asking for an MD perspective OP and i cant give you that. But from what I’ve gathered what @libertyyne is the most accurate summation (the “on average” quote). But as he led onto there are several DO schools that can do the majority of their rotations with residents, have plenty of access to research, and dont have strict primary care 3rd year tracks. This typically tends to be the state DO schools and the well established ones (yet there are exceptions with even this).

Overal biggest curriculum difference is OMM, and i cant confirm this but most DO students i know just say this takes away from free study time. I dont think we take away from other curriculum for it, but ive never attended an MD school so i cant confirm.
 
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Dwan

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There is not a difference besides omm and increased research opportunities. There are so many different quality schools of both types that a meaningful comparison is pointless beyond those generalities. At my DO school, my rotations are at a very large urban academic teaching hospital with a level 1 trauma center and plenty of research opportunities. Not the same at all schools. Certain newer MD schools have far worse rotations than that. Ultimately there is very little difference between the two schooling types. If there was a large discrepancy, we would not be trusted with treating the public. Any DO I know would never dream of trash talking MDs (except the weird zealot type) and any MD I know who has actually worked with DOs wouldnt dream of trashing them. We are the same profession under two different degrees. We work very well together and the degree generally doesn't matter in the real world (in my experience working with both MDs and DOs). It matters to premeds and a few old school docs on both sides.

Please give examples of the new MD schools with "far worse rotations." New MD schools such as Mayo AZ and Kaiser are not only affiliated with well established healthcare systems, but they also offer full tuition scholarships as financial incentives because the initial class sizes are kept small (allowing for better clinical rotation experiences). I'm just curious if you have actual data to back up your claims or are basing this off of b.s. your school and colleagues feed you.
 
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deleted407021

DOs aren't as well trained in medical school as MD students. I've worked with a few interns now
You’re making a massively sweeping statement based on that you’ve “worked with a few interns now”? I’ve only ever heard the opposite from dozens of posts on SDN and from the program directors who take grads from my school. They never notice any difference between the grads they work with based on degree, good or bad.
 
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deleted407021

Maybe because we’re all physicians or are all going to be and we’ve already beaten the relative lack of meaningful distinction to god**** death over years and years such that petty MD vs DO threads like this are nauseatingly dull and useless.
 
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hurtem&healem

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Maybe because we’re all physicians or are all going to be and we’ve already beaten the relative lack of meaningful distinction to god**** death over years and years such that petty MD vs DO threads like this are nauseatingly dull and useless.
This wasn't ever supposed to be a "DO vs MD thread." There was a very specific question asked about the MD curriculum, then everyone jumped in here to argue this same inane bs again. There's still people talking about third year and the difference in quality, or lack thereof, in clinical rotations and the interns they produce. YOU are the problem with this thread.
 
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deleted407021

This wasn't ever supposed to be a "DO vs MD thread." There was a very specific question asked about the MD curriculum, then everyone jumped in here to argue this same inane bs again. There's still people talking about third year and the difference in quality, or lack thereof, in clinical rotations and the interns they produce. YOU are the problem with this thread.
It says MD vs DO in the title, literally. It asked a question that’s been answered thousands of times. Plenty of MDs have spoken to DO training, OP just needed to look it up. This thread is not asking or providing anything new or interesting. However, the most inane thing in this thread is definitely your need to find people who are “the problem” and call them out in all caps.
 
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68PGunner

This thread tells me that NPs are lacking major respect. MDs and DOs need to recognize NPs' contribution to the quality of healthcare delivery and pay them accordingly to their produced volume and revenue.
 
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