HughMyron

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I know MD/PhD programs are much more competitive, but I wanted to know what they required that was different from an MD program. For example, do they require a science/engineering major? A publication in a respectable journal? A 3.8/36+?
 

MedPR

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I know what the differences are, I was talking about admissions, because I know there's a lot of misinformation and rumors going around about them. For example, my advisor pretty much said that you needed a 3.8+/37+ to be competitive for one, which I later found out wasn't entirely true.
It's probably as true as needing a 3.7/32 to be competitive for MD.
 

Lollygag

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I have heard that you need extensive research compared to MD as in publications, or multiple presentations/ posters at national conferences-- stuff like that, but that is just what I heard. I don't know if a 37 is necessary tho, I thought it would be more like 34-35+ but I think 3.8+ would be competitive.
 

xXIDaShizIXx

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I have heard that you need extensive research compared to MD as in publications, or multiple presentations/ posters at national conferences-- stuff like that, but that is just what I heard. I don't know if a 37 is necessary tho, I thought it would be more like 34-35+ but I think 3.8+ would be competitive.
Something more like this. I had wanted to do it at one time.
 

MedPR

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I have heard that you need extensive research compared to MD as in publications, or multiple presentations/ posters at national conferences-- stuff like that, but that is just what I heard. I don't know if a 37 is necessary tho, I thought it would be more like 34-35+ but I think 3.8+ would be competitive.
Idk there was a thread here not too long ago (like last week) debunking the necessity of pubs for MD/PhD. Obviously you need to have demonstrated an interest in research moreso than an MD applicant though.
 

K31

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You pretty much need to be a science or engineering major to be competitive for MD/PhD. GPA and MCAT tend to be higher than for MD, but that varies.

The one thing that is absolutely necessary for MD/PhD admissions is significant amounts of research. The typical applicant had a couple of school years plus summers doing research. Many (probably close to 50%) take a year or two off after college to do research full-time.

However, publications are far from required--in my experience (as a senior MD/PhD student and someone who has participated in the admissions process for most of my time in the program) it is a significant minority who have publications. Being able to talk about your research, having evidence of significant involvement in your research (eg poster presentations), and getting good LORs from your research mentors are all more important.
 

TriagePreMed

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I know MD/PhD programs are much more competitive, but I wanted to know what they required that was different from an MD program. For example, do they require a science/engineering major? A publication in a respectable journal? A 3.8/36+?
There is no specific major requirement usually unless you're going into a very technical field such as computational neuroscience where a strong background in computer science is to your advantage. You don't need to have any journal publications, although those do help. Typically, you need to show a commitment or desire for research during your undergraduate years. I've heard professors say that for PhD students, something as 2 summers of research suffice even for top schools, but it is mostly recommended that you do some lab work during the school year. If your school allows for a senior thesis, it would be to your advantage to do one.
 

LizzyM

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More or less, you need to be a strong applicant for a PhD in a specific area of study and a strong applicant for an MD.

Do you have what it takes to get into a PhD program? (academically and with respect to experiences). Do you have an interest in having a career that requires a doctoral degree?
 
OP
HughMyron

HughMyron

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More or less, you need to be a strong applicant for a PhD in a specific area of study and a strong applicant for an MD.

Do you have what it takes to get into a PhD program? (academically and with respect to experiences). Do you have an interest in having a career that requires a doctoral degree?
Interesting.

Personally, I had no interest in a PhD, especially not in a field in science or engineering. I was just asking because we all know that premed advisors usually know jack diddly. :)
 

K31

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I've heard professors say that for PhD students, something as 2 summers of research suffice even for top schools, but it is mostly recommended that you do some lab work during the school year.
That may be true for PhD admissions, but MD/PhD admissions is significantly more competitive than PhD and the typical applicant has much more research experience. A couple summers isn't going to cut it--a year of research is the minimum often mentioned, but most applicants have more.

Research experience isn't something to skimp on if you're planning to apply MD/PhD. Once you reach a certain GPA and MCAT threshold, research experience is by far the most important criterion.
 

Sephiroth

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That may be true for PhD admissions, but MD/PhD admissions is significantly more competitive than PhD and the typical applicant has much more research experience. A couple summers isn't going to cut it--a year of research is the minimum often mentioned, but most applicants have more.

Research experience isn't something to skimp on if you're planning to apply MD/PhD. Once you reach a certain GPA and MCAT threshold, research experience is by far the most important criterion.
Even that threshold isn't too high. I know 2 people who got into Colorado and Minnesota MSTPs with 30 MCAT scores (don't know their GPAs though), and one of them interviewed at Pitt and was told that as long as you meet a very low bar for GPA/MCAT, then those numbers cease to matter (though I doubt thats completely the case at every place). Its all about dat research.
 

K31

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Even that threshold isn't too high. I know 2 people who got into Colorado and Minnesota MSTPs with 30 MCAT scores (don't know their GPAs though), and one of them interviewed at Pitt and was told that as long as you meet a very low bar for GPA/MCAT, then those numbers cease to matter (though I doubt thats completely the case at every place). Its all about dat research.
The bar does vary--at my school, I don't recall ever interviewing an applicant with less than a 35, and 40+ isn't unusual. This is a solid, but not Top 5, school.

You are absolutely correct that it's all about the research though.