Jan 7, 2015
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How much does a General Practionier( A doctor who passed the USMLE tests but didnt get into residency) make and what kind of Jobs will he be offered?
I am thinking about taking a 1-2 years off to work and do some practice then I will go for the matching.
 

pageantry

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I know someone like that. You do need to do the match. You need that internship/transitional year but then you can quit and work as a doc, legally. This guy asks for about $5/hr less than board certified FM docs at a doc in a box, but never has trouble finding a job. I guess he can't take some kinds of insurance working by himself.

I can't confirm this, but from the dodgy way this part of his life is written about, I think Andrew Weill did that--internship year and then out. His wiki said he went to SF *for a year* for his residency. I think he got the letters and then peaced out to focus on herbs and alternative medicine, which seems to have turned out more or less just fine.

Another guy I know went through Harvard and UCSD, got the letters, never did another lick of medicine, and now makes his living calling himself *Dr.* [smith?], hosting inspirational PUA conference calls, playing professional poker, and wearing fedoras. But if you're into marketing sleazy self-help articles via HuffPo, I say don't let anything stop you. The world is your fedora.
 
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DrMidlife

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I don't think the plan here is to be a GP long term or to not practice. And presumably there's a reason to worry about matching. Such as being an IMG or FMG or having red flags or whatever. There are a lot of foreign grads who want more US clinical experience before they go up against their 50%-and-falling match rate.

Without an intern year you can't get a license to practice as a doctor in any US state. But with the MD or DO degree you can work with the rights of a PA In a couple states such as Missouri. I think Alabama is the other one.

Used to be you could stop after intern year and get a license and go into practice. In the few states that allow this, the only jobs you can get are the ones you create (as pag says) or the ones nobody wants.

What I don't understand is the context for moonlighting. After intern year and passing Step 3 you can get shifts at urgent care etc. I don't know if these shifts are available if you're not in a residency program.
 

pageantry

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Thanks, Doc M, I think I got started writing and forgot to stop...
 

Law2Doc

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I don't think the plan here is to be a GP long term or to not practice. And presumably there's a reason to worry about matching. Such as being an IMG or FMG or having red flags or whatever. There are a lot of foreign grads who want more US clinical experience before they go up against their 50%-and-falling match rate.

Without an intern year you can't get a license to practice as a doctor in any US state. But with the MD or DO degree you can work with the rights of a PA In a couple states such as Missouri. I think Alabama is the other one.

Used to be you could stop after intern year and get a license and go into practice. In the few states that allow this, the only jobs you can get are the ones you create (as pag says) or the ones nobody wants.

What I don't understand is the context for moonlighting. After intern year and passing Step 3 you can get shifts at urgent care etc. I don't know if these shifts are available if you're not in a residency program.
If you are IMG you may need 2-3 years of residency before you are eligible for a license, not just intern year, depending on the state. It's illegal to hold yourself out as a doctor or general practitioner or physician without a license. Basically without a license you can't practice medicine.
 
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cabinbuilder

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Most places anymore (including urgent care) expect board certification prior to hire. The days of one year GP are essentially over (even in the fringes of Alaska) and it is not a good plan to purposely go that route. Yes, there is moonlighting as a resident but that is a whole different entity with regards to type of license, the state you are in, and malpractice policies that the residency covers.
 
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gyngyn

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A US Senior is the best chance anyone has at a good match.
Every year that one delays reduces the chance at any match.
 
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