Bluesun

Handbag Inspector
Jul 20, 2011
99
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Greetings all!

The current dilemma I am having is as follows:

I work a normal 9-5 office job with somewhat flexible hours (+/-1 hour start/end time for example). All of the prereqs that I need (chem II, year of o-chem and bio) that are offered by my local state university are 5 days a week and/or middle of the day/morning. Unfortunately, given my work schedule, it's just not possible. My hope was that they would offer night classes of some sort, but I have been trying to make it work since last fall to no avail.

I know that a well respected local community college (that I obtained an associate's degree from before attaining my bachelor's) offers the classes at times that would work for me. However, at least one school that I am interested in explicitly says they do not want all of your prereqs to be taken at a community college... Not only would I save money, but I would actually be able to take the damn classes. I'm feeling like I am stuck between a rock and a hard place. The last thing I want to do is give up my current job just to take prereqs, especially given the research opportunities and the resume buffs.

I know the community college debate has been beaten to death around here, and I was convinced to not take any more classes at one, but I'm starting to feel like I have no other options. Those of you that have sat on ADCOMs or are "in the know", in a situation like mine, is it really that big of a deal? Is a situation like this a "good enough" excuse?

Any/all comments/advice are welcome. Thanks everyone!
 

theseeker4

PGY 3
7+ Year Member
Apr 20, 2011
3,499
760
Suburban Detroit, MI
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Greetings all!

The current dilemma I am having is as follows:

I work a normal 9-5 office job some somewhat flexible hours (+/-1 hour start/end time for example). All of the prereqs that I need (year of chem, o-chem and bio) that are offered by my local state university are 5 days a week and/or middle of the day/morning. Unfortunately, given my work schedule, it's just not possible. My hope was that they would offer night classes of some sort, but I have been trying to make it work since last fall to no avail.

I know that a well respected local community college (that I obtained an associate's degree from before attaining my bachelor's) offers the classes at times that would work for me. However, at least one school that I am interested in explicitly says they do not want all of your prereqs to be taken at a community college... Not only would I save money, but I would actually be able to take the damn classes. I'm feeling like I am stuck between a rock and a hard place. The last thing I want to do is give up my current job just to take prereqs, especially given the research opportunities and the resume buffs.

I know the community college debate has been beaten to death around here, and I was convinced to not take any more classes at one, but I'm starting to feel like I have no other options. Those of you that have sat on ADCOMs or are "in the know", in a situation like mine, is it really that big of a deal?

Any/all comments/advice are welcome. Thanks everyone!
You might have to write off that one school that explicitly says don't take all your pre-reqs at a CC, but even they may give you latitude considering you are being forced to do so by life. If I were you, with that school, I would call and see what they say after explaining to them you are unable to quit your job to take them at the university, and the CC courses are all that are available at the time you need.

Adcoms know life happens, and at least at many schools, tend to give a pass on some of the "rules" for applicants to non-trads. I know at least a few members on here have stated they took all their pre-reqs at CC's and gained admission.....
 
Nov 1, 2011
175
2
Status
Greetings all!

The current dilemma I am having is as follows:

I work a normal 9-5 office job with somewhat flexible hours (+/-1 hour start/end time for example). All of the prereqs that I need (chem II, year of o-chem and bio) that are offered by my local state university are 5 days a week and/or middle of the day/morning. Unfortunately, given my work schedule, it's just not possible. My hope was that they would offer night classes of some sort, but I have been trying to make it work since last fall to no avail.

I know that a well respected local community college (that I obtained an associate's degree from before attaining my bachelor's) offers the classes at times that would work for me. However, at least one school that I am interested in explicitly says they do not want all of your prereqs to be taken at a community college... Not only would I save money, but I would actually be able to take the damn classes. I'm feeling like I am stuck between a rock and a hard place. The last thing I want to do is give up my current job just to take prereqs, especially given the research opportunities and the resume buffs.

I know the community college debate has been beaten to death around here, and I was convinced to not take any more classes at one, but I'm starting to feel like I have no other options. Those of you that have sat on ADCOMs or are "in the know", in a situation like mine, is it really that big of a deal? Is a situation like this a "good enough" excuse?

Any/all comments/advice are welcome. Thanks everyone!

It sounds like you don't have a choice other than to take the courses at your local community college. Obviously schools prefer you take the courses at a university but they will still let you apply regardless. Most schools will understand your situation and the fact that you are working full time while taking the courses will play in your favor (assuming you do well). Contact the schools before you apply and if they aren't understanding of your situation just apply somewhere else (most students don't get their first pick of schools anyway). There will likely be much more emphasis placed on your MCAT score though so if you take the courses at a CC don't just go for the A. Try to gain mastery of the material because it will make your life much easier come MCAT time.
 
About the Ads

Bluesun

Handbag Inspector
Jul 20, 2011
99
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I do have another option, which is a private, 4-year university that is literally double the cost of the local state school. The schedule would still suck, but I could probably pull it off one class at a time. Terribly expensive, though.
 

Back 5

10+ Year Member
Jan 22, 2009
1,372
240
Status
If you have been out of school for a while, you will need to demonstrate that you can handle an increased courseload...more than 1 class at a time. Not only will taking 1 class a semester take you years to finish the pre-reqs, it's fairly easy to work 40+ hours a week and take 1 class. I've done it, not that bad. Now, working 40+ hours a week and taking 2 or more science classes...totally different story.

I am taking all my courses at the local community college. I have no choice as the university near me offers no night classes. I don't even think it counts that the CC I go to was voted the best in the nation, it's still a CC.

Just do what you can, get the classes completed as soon as you can, don't let your grades slip (at all!) rock the MCAT and apply early and broadly!
 

docelh

10+ Year Member
Mar 11, 2010
933
10
Status
Pre-Medical
I'm going to be pretty frank about this.

I have come across a lot of aspiring pre-medders through school, clinical research, and the free clinic in my town. I have met some successful candidates, but most of them don't make it. They don't commit enough to the coursework, they have no idea what ECs to pursue, they over-extended themselves, etc.

If you want to get into a mid-tier allopathic school, you have to perform well in all phases of the game. And that means not doing it half-hearted. I have found the process to be such a grind. To do the coursework, prepare for the MCAT, do the ECs.... that's some serious chunk of change in time, energy, and the overall context called my life. To do all this with a full-time job is to start behind the eight ball. Even without a job, I was incredibly pressed for time/energy just to stay afloat with the coursework and ECs. I had no personal life/family distractions either. It's that demanding.

Good luck.
 
Last edited:
May 14, 2012
11
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I'm going to be pretty frank about this.

I have come across a lot of aspiring pre-medders through school, clinical research, and the free clinic in my town. I have met some successful candidates, but most of them don't make it. They don't commit enough to the coursework, they have no idea what ECs to pursue, they over-extended themselves, etc.

If you want to get into a mid-tier allopathic school, you have to perform well in all phases of the game. And that means not doing it half-hearted. I have found the process to be such a grind. To do the coursework, prepare for the MCAT, do the ECs.... that's some serious chunk of change in time, energy, and the overall context called my life. To do all this with a full-time job is to start behind the eight ball. Even without a job, I was incredibly pressed for time/energy just to stay afloat with the coursework and ECs. I had no personal life/family distractions either. It's that demanding.

Good luck.
I'm Scared.

lol

But there are plenty of low gpa etc success stories and as I'm sure lot of rejections.

But you are right, getting into medical school is almost a full time job in and of itself.
 

Bluesun

Handbag Inspector
Jul 20, 2011
99
0
Status
Pre-Medical
If you have been out of school for a while, you will need to demonstrate that you can handle an increased courseload...more than 1 class at a time. Not only will taking 1 class a semester take you years to finish the pre-reqs, it's fairly easy to work 40+ hours a week and take 1 class. I've done it, not that bad. Now, working 40+ hours a week and taking 2 or more science classes...totally different story.

I am taking all my courses at the local community college. I have no choice as the university near me offers no night classes. I don't even think it counts that the CC I go to was voted the best in the nation, it's still a CC.

Just do what you can, get the classes completed as soon as you can, don't let your grades slip (at all!) rock the MCAT and apply early and broadly!
I agree with the increased courseload, which is why the private school is an issue as well. So the question is, what is worse, taking all of one's prereqs at a CC, or only taking one class a semester, but from a private 4-year university?

I'm going to be pretty frank about this.

I have come across a lot of aspiring pre-medders through school, clinical research, and the free clinic in my town. I have met some successful candidates, but most of them don't make it. They don't commit enough to the coursework, they have no idea what ECs to pursue, they over-extended themselves, etc.

If you want to get into a mid-tier allopathic school, you have to perform well in all phases of the game. And that means not doing it half-hearted. I have found the process to be such a grind. To do the coursework, prepare for the MCAT, do the ECs.... that's some serious chunk of change in time, energy, and the overall context called my life. To do all this with a full-time job is to start behind the eight ball. Even without a job, I was incredibly pressed for time/energy just to stay afloat with the coursework and ECs. I had no personal life/family distractions either. It's that demanding.

Good luck.
I have no doubt that it will be demanding while working a full time job -- but it's what has to be done :).

Thanks for weighing in.
 

Back 5

10+ Year Member
Jan 22, 2009
1,372
240
Status
I chose the route of the CC. I'll find out next year when I apply if I chose wisely or poorly :)
 

LegendaryPunk

Get Addicted
7+ Year Member
Apr 4, 2011
217
52
Status
Pre-Medical
Don't let the requirements of one school control define your pre-med plan. Just take the classes at the CC; it creates an extra hurdle but it's not a complete roadblock. In your case you've exhausted all other options, and are just going to have to do the best with what you can. Some schools will understand this, some school won't - just do your research accordindly and adjust your school list as necessary.
 
Mar 4, 2012
35
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I'm going to be pretty frank about this.

I have come across a lot of aspiring pre-medders through school, clinical research, and the free clinic in my town. I have met some successful candidates, but most of them don't make it. They don't commit enough to the coursework, they have no idea what ECs to pursue, they over-extended themselves, etc.
Feeling paranoid here... I've read a lot of threads and tried to figure out exactly which ECs to pursue to best enhance my application. What do you suggest?
 
About the Ads