Mgh

Discussion in 'Pathology' started by dlc6, Dec 10, 2005.

  1. dlc6

    dlc6 Member
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    Any MGH residents on this forum? I have an interview there in January and but know nothing about the program from a residents' perspective...and the only scutwork review is pretty old. If there are any MGH residents on this site, can you either please post a review on scutwork or even just tell us a little bit about the program here? Also, if anyone has interviewed there this year, what did you think?
    dlc
     
  2. CameronFrye

    CameronFrye Senior Member
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    Do a search for the poster "Mindy". She has posted quite a bit of info on MGH.
     
  3. Mindy

    Mindy Senior Member
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    Hi:

    Find me when you come to MGH in January, we can sit down and have a talk after your interviews are done if you like. I am the only "Mindy" in the program, so not hard to find! I have just finished being the CP chief resident (a 4 month position) and may run into you anyway, since I am responsible for a chunk of the applicant recruitment. The same goes for anyone else who is interviewing, as I am more than happy to talk about my experiences at the General.

    Bottom line for me is, I love MGH, and I cannot imagine training anywhere else. In fact, my long range career plans now include MGH, as I have taken a forensic pathology fellowship position at the Boston Medical Examiner's Office for 2007 and am looking to have an ongoing academic relationship with the path dep't. I am more than happy to field questions about the program, or forensics for that matter. I do not log into SDN as often anymore, so I cannot promise prompt replies...

    C.F. is right, I have posted a lot of previous messages about MGH, though, so maybe they are useful!

    My regards, and best of luck in the interview process...

    Mindy
     
  4. AngryTesticle

    AngryTesticle Happy Gonad
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    Hi Mindy,

    As a resident across town from where you are, I was just curious about something. Approximately what percent of cases are signed out based solely on morphological grounds alone? Do you think your use of impox stains to sign out a case is just right or overboard? Along those lines, what percentage of your cases are held for "Additional Immunohistochemistry Required"? Personally, I think we rely way too much on impox here. I bet you've heard the same thing about us ;) .

    Anyways, along the lines of this thread, I thought MGH was a fantastic program when I visited last year. I've signed out with a few faculty who trained at MGH for their residency...and geez, am I blown away!

    It's really too bad that the MGH and BWH residents don't interact as much. I'm sure we would have some interesting and enlightening discussions on how things are done at our respective institutions. Heck, one of your residents is doing a 2 week heme rotation here...and we've had some fun conversations when it comes down to comparing notes and just talking about how things work at MGH and BWH.

    Cheers,
    AT
     
  5. Mindy

    Mindy Senior Member
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    Hi AT:

    It is a real shame that we don't mingle more. Should have a Boston Pathology Resident Social Hour?!

    And just for a reciprocal plug, I also really enjoyed the Brigham when I was around for interviews. If the residents interacted more, I bet it would lead to more mingling by residents of the various strengths of the hospitals.

    As far as your use of impox, I really do not hear much about it through the grapevine.

    We really do tend toward morph diagnoses, when possible. That being said, we use impox when we have to, in cases of heme malignancies or soft tissue tumors, of course. Or carcinoma of unknown primary. We usually put our impox results as an addendum in the latter case, but will sign above line, simply "metastatic carcinoma". And generally, we have a solid differential going prior to impox (which really is key to the use of ancillary testing of any type) so are not too often surprised. In general I am satisfied with the quantity of impox we use.

    Mindy
     
  6. AngryTesticle

    AngryTesticle Happy Gonad
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    Sounds like a great idea...now we have to find a time that's mutually agreeable for as many people as possible. Easier said than done! :laugh:
    Yeah, it's always nice to just get some exposure to how other institutions do things.

    Gotcha. I guess we're in the similar boat as well and maybe I was overreacting a bit. Yeah, heme cases are bound to get a huge panel of impox studies. Soft tissue tumors too...hell, they all look like spindle cell neoplasms (well, for the most part) to me! Hell, I've been getting quite a few of these neurofibroma, schwannoma, MPNST, GIST, various sarcomas, etc cases recently and everytime my initial reaction is like :eek: followed by putting my head down and banging it against the desk. Anyways, it definitely does help to order the typical panel of stains like c-kit, S100, CD34, etc to get a better sense of what's going on and/or to confirm what one is already suspecting. Of course, problems arise when one impox result seems like an outlier...then you have to explain it or dig deeper :laugh:

    It seems that this is also attending dependent. Some of our attendings are more liberal with regards to ordering many impox studies whereas others just put their foot down and make the diagnosis based on morphology. I guess that has to do with the art of pathology.

    I do hear that MGH and BWH have great impox labs...which makes me feel that we might be spoiled. The one issue that arises then is that we take it for granted. I can imagine what the private practice folks have to go through since they typically don't have many of our fancy impox protocols at their disposal. And that's where solid training in heavily morphologic-based diagnostics really become important!

    Anyways, I'll stop babbling. Anyways back to the initial point...how well do your residents attend these New England Pathology Society meetings? Meeting up at one of these would be a great stepping stone to organizing some social mingling occasion.
     
  7. PathOne

    PathOne Derminatrix
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    While I haven't trained at MGH myself, I've worked with several who did, and they're uniformly very, very good. Personally, I'd rate MGH (and BWH) as probably the best residency in the world. Also know someone who transferred after two years from Johns Hopkins (not exactly bad either) to MGH, and strongly preferred the latter.

    However, be aware that the workload is heavy. Probably the only place that works residents as hard is Mount Sinai NYC.

    Also, you might want to consider if you have any special preferences for fellowship training and if you plan to do it at the same hospital, b/c MGH isn't top dog in all subspecs.
     
  8. Mindy

    Mindy Senior Member
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    Awww Shucks, PathOne....

    (But I feel exactly the same way about the General!)

    I think I know who you are referring to, by the way...

    Also, for general resident-seeker advice, if you are CERTAIN you know what fellowship you want to do, go to a program with a strong reputation in that field. Make sure that they have a fellowship, and make sure you express your interest from the get-go, including publishing!

    If you are not certain, go to a program that is strong in (nearly) everything.

    That being said, while I love MGH, I am not oblivious to the fact that there are many good places to train.

    Best to all,
    Mindy
     
  9. AngryTesticle

    AngryTesticle Happy Gonad
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    Interesting. When I went to JHU for interview, a few residents talked smack about MGH which I thought was a little suspect. Perhaps it's a rivalry thing...I dunno. Oh, and I like how you put us in parentheses ;) ... just messin.
    I think applicants should definitely be aware of this. You go to these kind of institutions and you will work hard. But, I think that one does need to work hard to see a variety of cases and learn a lot that pathology has to offer.
    Well, a lot of places aren't the top dog in all subspecialties. Some subspecialties are stronger here as well. We have a great Gyn and Soft Tissue fellowship for example. Derm, Breast, and GI are also strong here as well.
     

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