Military Service

theonlytycrane

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    Do you have positives from your military experiences that have impacted your character? If so, fair game. Otherwise it sounds like you're just trying to boost your app although your experience may have ended on a sour note.
     
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    xffan624

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      I was seperated from the military a year before my obligation was up, but was still given an honorable discharge. Should I put it on my application or just forget about those years?

      You can state what you did while you were in. Most adcoms are not familiar with the military and won't be able to tell if you completed your obligation or not. They'll just see the years and whatever duties you had. If an adcom asks why you left the military then answer truthfully and state what you learned from the experience, but there's no reason to parade the fact that you were separated (correct spelling, btw) for being overweight. You signed on the dotted line and completed your duties honorably per the military (they gave you an honorable discharge). Be proud of that at the least and learn from your mistakes.
       

      Matthew9Thirtyfive

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        You can state what you did while you were in. Most adcoms are not familiar with the military and won't be able to tell if you completed your obligation or not. They'll just see the years and whatever duties you had. If an adcom asks why you left the military then answer truthfully and state what you learned from the experience, but there's no reason to parade the fact that you were separated (correct spelling, btw) for being overweight. You signed on the dotted line and completed your duties honorably per the military (they gave you an honorable discharge). Be proud of that at the least and learn from your mistakes.

        Technically if he was separated due to BCA failures, that means he left before his obligation was up and therefore didn't fulfill his duties, as being within standards is a direct order from on high. An honorable discharge doesn't mean he wasn't in violation of standards or anything, it just means they didn't think he was a **** bag so they didn't want to screw him once he got out.

        I still think you should list it. How long were you in, OP?
         
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        gonnif

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          Pros:
          You have an honorable discharge
          You have experience in supervising in a health care setting
          adcoms count military service as a medium to high positive

          Cons:
          You left early

          It is unlikely adcoms will see or look at the nuance of leaving early; they will see honorable discharge and will be fine with it all, even if you discharged early due to BCA issues.

          You should absolutely list this and be proud. Dont let the premed neurosis make you question this. With the low percent of population who serve, especially college students, this is a definite standout. That it, when the adcom is discussing the 15-20 3.7-3.8 Bio majors from ivies or similar, having a single veteran in the stack is easier to remember. Small group dynamics sometimes matter in these discussion
           
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          Mclovin0351

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            The only $.02 I have to add is to keep your discussion positive and emphasize what you learned (teamwork, leadership, etc). If you don't bring up getting out early it's probably a non-issue
             
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            GnothiSeauton

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              Don't overestimate civilians' understanding of military service. Like gonnif said, they won't really understand the nuance. You and those you served with have prejudices informed by intimate experience with the service, and just about nobody involved in your application process will have those. Unless you gave military secrets to the Chinese every veteran gets a reflexive "thank you for your service". You're good.
               
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              Miami Thrice

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                Hey man, eight year vet here who has had a very successful application cycle. Through ten interviews I've been asked very little about my military experience except for how it shaped my motivation for medicine. If anyone were to ask about why you left the service the answer, "To pursue medicine" would likely suffice and talking about the circumstances of the discharge would be superfluous. Also realize, by even taking the oath of enlistment or commission you've made a commitment most people would never consider.

                What would look suspicious is putting that you are a veteran on the application and never mentioning it, or leaving it off altogether and having unaccounted for time. Your definitely want admissions departments to know you are a veteran, it's a game changing status.

                Concerning the "not fulfilling a commitment" chatter, it is baseless. I spent my last 2.5 years in command and discharged more than a few soldiers for body fat standards. They are very strict and for many age brackets unrealistic and encouraging of dangerous weight cutting behavior. It's often a very odd situation when it comes around to actually putting someone out.

                Overall I'll share with you the best advice I received on the admissions cycle and interviews, "Don't be a spaz", put it on there and leave off the circumstances unless asked specifically, be proud of the service you did do.
                 
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                AnotherLawyer

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                  I was seperated from the military a year before my obligation was up, but was still given an honorable discharge. Should I put it on my application or just forget about those years?

                  I'm not sure why you are asking this. The application asks if you've served in the military. You have so you answer yes.
                   
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                  gabem480

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                    I would mention it because it is unique in my opinion. Here is the thing you are part of the less than 2% or so of Americans who make the decision to serve. Not an easy decision by any means but a decision. I would think that in your cycle the applicant pool will be made up of less that 2% veterans meaning you have 1 unique experience not many other applicants have. On top of that from everything I have read I would believe that adcoms are drawn to veterans and they tend to appreciate those who serve.
                     
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                    Matthew9Thirtyfive

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                      Concerning the "not fulfilling a commitment" chatter, it is baseless. I spent my last 2.5 years in command and discharged more than a few soldiers for body fat standards. They are very strict and for many age brackets unrealistic and encouraging of dangerous weight cutting behavior. It's often a very odd situation when it comes around to actually putting someone out.

                      Agree with everything you posted except for this. It's service dependent. In the Navy, the standards are NOT strict. In fact, they were just lowered again. For a 5'10" male 17-21, you can weigh 191# and be at 22% body fat. That's ridiculous. And the body fat only goes up from there.

                      Don't even get me started on the PRT standards.
                       

                      xffan624

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                        I'm not sure why you are asking this. The application asks if you've served in the military. You have so you answer yes.

                        I forgot about that section, so OP will have to answer yes, but I think the more nuanced question would be whether to highlight his experiences on his application. I would answer yes to this as well for the reasons stated above by other posters.
                         
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