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HPSP applicants: Medicare counts your prelim yr in the mil. in thir GME funding math (DME). If you decide not to train in the mil. after finishing your tour you could face trouble. E.g., if you did a TRI in the mil., became a GMO and then left the mil, you may not match to e.g. EM. Most programs are PGY 1-3/4, and the (repeated) PGY-1 would be funded at 50% level only. The program would have to provide ~ $15-25K from their funds to pay for your salary/benefits. This will not help your application! I was told this by a PD recently. When I was thinking about taking HPSP, I was told that the prelim yr in the navy would not count against me in my future residency training--either false (ignorance) or a lie. However, if applying to a PGY-2 program (e.g. anesth), you should have not problems: your mil. prelim satisfies their prelim requirement. Just thought you should know--a bad deal!
 

Gastrapathy

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HPSP applicants: Medicare counts your prelim yr in the mil. in thir GME funding math (DME). If you decide not to train in the mil. after finishing your tour you could face trouble. E.g., if you did a TRI in the mil., became a GMO and then left the mil, you may not match to e.g. EM. Most programs are PGY 1-3/4, and the (repeated) PGY-1 would be funded at 50% level only. The program would have to provide ~ $15-25K from their funds to pay for your salary/benefits. This will not help your application! I was told this by a PD recently. When I was thinking about taking HPSP, I was told that the prelim yr in the navy would not count against me in my future residency training--either false (ignorance) or a lie. However, if applying to a PGY-2 program (e.g. anesth), you should have not problems: your mil. prelim satisfies their prelim requirement. Just thought you should know--a bad deal!
This has been discussed before. Most people are not affected. Its a bigger issue if you want to switch specialties. Do an IM or tranny internship and want to be a surgeon? It could be an issue. My impression, though, is that this is outweighed by how PDs view military service. Everyone I know has gotten to train in what they wanted after their obligation. My fellow interns who got out after GMO time several years ago seemed to be universally successful at matching into competitive specialties.
 

JackADeli

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...My impression, though, is that this is outweighed by how PDs view military service. Everyone I know has gotten to train in what they wanted after their obligation...
Interesting.... I know several colleagues and former residents that have found for lack of better word, "prejudice" against prior military. Apparently, all to common, "he/she is military", "he/she is rigid/inflexible cause of military", "stop being so militant, you aren't in the military...."

It seemed like they encountered their every action as being viewed through "military gogles" as if their action/s were a result of military indoctrination/drill/etc....

Granted, I also know some PD that like prior military... often for the same reasons and perspective/"prejudice".....
 

notdeadyet

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Interesting.... I know several colleagues and former residents that have found for lack of better word, "prejudice" against prior military.
The prejudice I'd be more concerned with is the prejudice against potential skill atrophy after four years as a GMO.

I've heard nothing but positive things about folks applying to primary care residencies after four years as a GMO. But if you're going from a GMO to applying for a surgical residency or somesuch, I could see their concern. At it seems that those are the specialties that folks have sometimes found themselves having to repeat intern year (brrr).

Also, I have been quite surprised by how many ex-milmed folks I've met in academic medicine. I would think that could potentially help you.
 

jabreal00

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Interesting.... I know several colleagues and former residents that have found for lack of better word, "prejudice" against prior military. Apparently, all to common, "he/she is military", "he/she is rigid/inflexible cause of military", "stop being so militant, you aren't in the military...."

It seemed like they encountered their every action as being viewed through "military gogles" as if their action/s were a result of military indoctrination/drill/etc....

Granted, I also know some PD that like prior military... often for the same reasons and perspective/"prejudice".....
I have never heard of this bias before. Most PD or clinicians on the civilian side have neutral or favorable impression of military trained physicians. Most of those getting out of my specialties have no problems finding jobs either at academic centers or in private groups.

I agree with the poster above, if one did four years of GMO and applies for neurosurgery or any other hyper-competitive residency, they will not be looked at favorably.
 

Gastrapathy

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I have never heard of this bias before. Most PD or clinicians on the civilian side have neutral or favorable impression of military trained physicians. Most of those getting out of my specialties have no problems finding jobs either at academic centers or in private groups.

I agree with the poster above, if one did four years of GMO and applies for neurosurgery or any other hyper-competitive residency, they will not be looked at favorably.
I can't speak for NS, but, off the top of my head, there are folks who got out after GMO and did derm, anes, Rads, and ophtho from my intern class.

The skill atrophy thing doesn't really apply to people who don't have any skills yet. If all you've done is internship, you don't really have skills to lose.

There may be prejudice out there, but, you only have to find one place to train and, from what I've seen, people have done fine. That said, there is no tracking of this information and my experience is anecdotal. Also, those are a long four years and, in the current environment, you'll be lucky to only deploy twice.
 

Jet915

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Jet915

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I guess I lucked out, I did an IM military internship and just matched into civilian gas........as for the military bias, during my civilian interviews, the interviewers where either very interested in my military experience or didn't really care; however, I never had anyone seem to hold it against me.