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MPP vs. MPH

pedsid

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Hey everyone,
So I'm almost certain that I'm taking a year off of med school to do either an MPH in policy or and MPP (master of public policy) in health policy. I was wondering what everyone's thoughts are. I've looked at the Kennedy School for the MPP. Does anyone know anything about Princeton's MPP?
My thoughts are to apply to MPP's at Harvard and Princeton and MPH's at Hopkins, UNC, and GW ... and see where I get in. My preference would be an MPP from the Kennedy School at Harvard (not sure if I can get in).
My ultimate goals are to to Peds ID and work at least part time in policy either in government or with a uninversity. Ultimately, I would love to work for the government (after many years of practicing) toward the huge health problems are country has. Most specifically health care access for the uninsured and health care disparities.

What do you guys think of this all? I'd really value your opinions. What do you guys think of the MPP vs. the MPH? What do you think of the schools I listed?

Thanks.
 

exmike

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pedsid said:
Hey everyone,
So I'm almost certain that I'm taking a year off of med school to do either an MPH in policy or and MPP (master of public policy) in health policy. I was wondering what everyone's thoughts are. I've looked at the Kennedy School for the MPP. Does anyone know anything about Princeton's MPP?
My thoughts are to apply to MPP's at Harvard and Princeton and MPH's at Hopkins, UNC, and GW ... and see where I get in. My preference would be an MPP from the Kennedy School at Harvard (not sure if I can get in).
My ultimate goals are to to Peds ID and work at least part time in policy either in government or with a uninversity. Ultimately, I would love to work for the government (after many years of practicing) toward the huge health problems are country has. Most specifically health care access for the uninsured and health care disparities.

What do you guys think of this all? I'd really value your opinions. What do you guys think of the MPP vs. the MPH? What do you think of the schools I listed?

Thanks.
I know this doesnt directly answer your question, but there are levels of overlap between a MPH in health policy and management and a MPP. UC Berkeley has an excellent Joint MPP/MPH program, but I'm not sure if you're interested in taking that much time (2.5 years, maybe 2) to do that. I think that if you go to a MPP program where you have room to take courses in the Pub Health school then that would be perfect. (which is why a MPP/MPH is perfect for someone with your interests). Personally I would get the MPH in health policy and management as it is probably more directly related to your goals than a MPP.
 

Heal&Teach

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I totally agree with exmike. Where you get your Master's will not matter in the long run. At least with the MPH, you can get a comprehensive public health curriculum along with a concentration in Health Policy. As a point of reference, the University of Michigan has a wonderful school of public policy, and as a graduate student, you can take courses across the different schools (i.e., social work, public policy, education, etc.). Once you have your MD, you won't need a MPH or MPP to qualify you. So choose a program that will allow you the most flexibility in your learning. I would also suggest that you get the opinion of someone who has graduated from either program and is in a position that you'd like to be in in the future.

And this does not necessarily apply here, but I know that some folks have gotten the Master of Health Services Administration, and been asked by employers whether they were thinking of getting a MBA degree. But for policy purposes, you'll be all right with either degree.

Best,
H&T
 
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FoughtFyr

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Heal&Teach said:
Once you have your MD, you won't need a MPH or MPP to qualify you. So choose a program that will allow you the most flexibility in your learning.
Best,
H&T

Actually, an MPH (or an MPP) is generally still listed among one's academic credentials. Versus other Master's degrees, I have seen a great many more physicians list themselves as Dr. John Smith MD, MPH in day to day stuff (as opposed to Dr. John Smith MD, MS). I have been told, repeatedly, that my MPH will be useful in the future as I plan to enter academic medicine.

No offense to DOs, I just chose MD for this post as I will have one in two weeks... :clap:

- H
 

Heal&Teach

cogito ergo sum
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Agreed FoughtFyr, I was just noting that there are clinicians in many arenas that do not have Masters degrees in a field of specialty and have just as much knowledge and expertise based on their experiences in public health, policy, etc.

And congrats on graduating from medical school!!!! :clap:
 

prefontaine

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Nov 28, 1998
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FoughtFyr said:
Actually, an MPH (or an MPP) is generally still listed among one's academic credentials. Versus other Master's degrees, I have seen a great many more physicians list themselves as Dr. John Smith MD, MPH in day to day stuff (as opposed to Dr. John Smith MD, MS). I have been told, repeatedly, that my MPH will be useful in the future as I plan to enter academic medicine.

No offense to DOs, I just chose MD for this post as I will have one in two weeks... :clap:

- H

FYI: In the US, the proper form is John Smith, MD or Dr. John Smith, not Dr. John Smith, MD.
 
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