Tuftsdent2010

New Member
10+ Year Member
Jul 5, 2006
2
0
Status
Dental Student
Hi..I recieved the Navy HPSP and I am in the process of making my decision of whether I want to accept this scholarship. I was wondering if there was anyone who has accepted this NAVY scholaship and has gone through the 4 year payback time and their thoughts on it. Would u do it again? Was ur experience what u excpected? Were you working with other dentists?
Were you able to choose the base where u were stationed for your 4 years of payback for the scholarship? Did u choose to specialize while you were in the navy?

Also, I was wondering how was the officer indoctrination school ..which has to be done during the summmer while ur in dental shool.

Thank you anyone who has any thoughts which would help me make my decision would be greatly appreciated! :)
 

Lesley

Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 18, 2006
707
20
Status
Attending Physician
1) Not in the scholarship program, but in the Navy right out of dental school.

2) With the scholarship you are in four years active duty and four years reserves. You are theirs for 8 years, not four. After eight years you can resign your commission, and if it is accepted you are then a civilian. They can opt to keep you in beyond the eight years, should there be a need.

3) It costs money to move you around. If you are not a career officer there is a good chance that you will stay in one place.

4) Good learning experience, if you are at a large base. At larger bases you will have the opportunity to work and train with specialists. They want you to learn. At smaller bases, less dentists, less specialists, less learning opportunities.

5) My XO and many commanders at my base earned their specialties while in the military and not before. This, however, was 24 years ago. I don't know what the status of speciaity training is now. Back then you had to apply for speciaity training after being in for a while. I think they wanted to make sure they were investing in people who wanted to make the military a career.


6) Office training education, at the time was two weeks in Norfolk. It was not grueling. It was not boot camp. It was interesting and friendly.


7) A free education is very appealing, but then again, nothing is free. Good luck.



Tuftsdent2010 said:
Hi..I recieved the Navy HPSP and I am in the process of making my decision of whether I want to accept this scholarship. I was wondering if there was anyone who has accepted this NAVY scholaship and has gone through the 4 year payback time and their thoughts on it. Would u do it again? Was ur experience what u excpected? Were you working with other dentists?
Were you able to choose the base where u were stationed for your 4 years of payback for the scholarship? Did u choose to specialize while you were in the navy?

Also, I was wondering how was the officer indoctrination school ..which has to be done during the summmer while ur in dental shool.

Thank you anyone who has any thoughts which would help me make my decision would be greatly appreciated! :)
 

dexadental

1K Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Nov 13, 2004
1,050
1
36
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Status
Dental Student
Lesley said:
1) Not in the scholarship program, but in the Navy right out of dental school.

2) With the scholarship you are in four years active duty and four years reserves. You are theirs for 8 years, not four. After eight years you can resign your commission, and if it is accepted you are then a civilian. They can opt to keep you in beyond the eight years, should there be a need.

3) It costs money to move you around. If you are not a career officer there is a good chance that you will stay in one place.

4) Good learning experience, if you are at a large base. At larger bases you will have the opportunity to work and train with specialists. They want you to learn. At smaller bases, less dentists, less specialists, less learning opportunities.

5) My XO and many commanders at my base earned their specialties while in the military and not before. This, however, was 24 years ago. I don't know what the status of speciaity training is now. Back then you had to apply for speciaity training after being in for a while. I think they wanted to make sure they were investing in people who wanted to make the military a career.


6) Office training education, at the time was two weeks in Norfolk. It was not grueling. It was not boot camp. It was interesting and friendly.


7) A free education is very appealing, but then again, nothing is free. Good luck.
I've accepted the Navy dental HPSP scholarship and will be signing commissioning paperwork next week. Lesley is right on a few things, but I guess I'll clarify a little about the program...

Officer training school can be taken any time, but they like to see it done by the time you finish dental school...I will have to delay mine probably until my senior year due to boards and summer classes...didn't have a chance to do it this summer because I haven't even filled the paperwork out yet, :) . I hear it isn't tough at all, and just gets you aquainted with military lingo/life and what the Navy is all about. Not very physical and no where near the grueling nature of basic training.

The active duty is 4 years, and then you are a civilian. You are not owned by the military for 8 years, but do owe them 4 years reserve duty. You do not need to attend monthly meetings or anything of that sort (like the national guard), but can be called up if needed (very rare unless a world war breaks out). While on the reserves, you are indeed considered a civilian. You can make your own decisions about practicing/specializing, living, moving, and all of that jazz. Just felt the need to clarify Leslie on that point.


You can apply for specialties through the military and likely get them if your resume and grades are above decent. Specialties in the military are less competitive for those within and the military will love to own you longer. I plan not to do this, and specialize after my commitment if I choose on my own dollar.

If you don't mind traveling and moving a lot, or being in the military, the program cannot be beat. Most people who will be attending dental school will have to pay back someone or something, either the military or the bank...either way it is a sacrifice (time versus money). For myself, the military seemed like an attractive option after speaking with many dentists within and specialists that have decided to stay on. I don't plan to do it more than 4 years though, that I am sure about. I hope you make the right decision for yourself, because in the end, only you will be managing and paying back your debt.
 

Lesley

Member
10+ Year Member
Jun 18, 2006
707
20
Status
Attending Physician
Hi, Everything you say is correct, but just know they can call you up to active duty while you are on reserve status, even if you are on inactive reserve status. I also chose inactive reserve. Aside from that possibilty looming, I lived a normal civilian life, but it did weigh on my mind from time to time especially if there were international troubles in the news. If they need you, it will not matter to them if you have a practice to run, business loans to pay, or a new baby at home.....you have made a commitment and you will be expected to honor it.

Just remember at the end of your reserve period to send in the paper work to resign your commission.

Officer training camp, as we called it, was a pleasant experience. The people you will work with and for have a lot of respect for your education and skills, it's almost a new experience for a recent dental student! Enjoy it and good luck! Sincerely, Lesley

dexadental said:
I've accepted the Navy dental HPSP scholarship and will be signing commissioning paperwork next week. Lesley is right on a few things, but I guess I'll clarify a little about the program...

Officer training school can be taken any time, but they like to see it done by the time you finish dental school...I will have to delay mine probably until my senior year due to boards and summer classes...didn't have a chance to do it this summer because I haven't even filled the paperwork out yet, :) . I hear it isn't tough at all, and just gets you aquainted with military lingo/life and what the Navy is all about. Not very physical and no where near the grueling nature of basic training.

The active duty is 4 years, and then you are a civilian. You are not owned by the military for 8 years, but do owe them 4 years reserve duty. You do not need to attend monthly meetings or anything of that sort (like the national guard), but can be called up if needed (very rare unless a world war breaks out). While on the reserves, you are indeed considered a civilian. You can make your own decisions about practicing/specializing, living, moving, and all of that jazz. Just felt the need to clarify Leslie on that point.


You can apply for specialties through the military and likely get them if your resume and grades are above decent. Specialties in the military are less competitive for those within and the military will love to own you longer. I plan not to do this, and specialize after my commitment if I choose on my own dollar.

If you don't mind traveling and moving a lot, or being in the military, the program cannot be beat. Most people who will be attending dental school will have to pay back someone or something, either the military or the bank...either way it is a sacrifice (time versus money). For myself, the military seemed like an attractive option after speaking with many dentists within and specialists that have decided to stay on. I don't plan to do it more than 4 years though, that I am sure about. I hope you make the right decision for yourself, because in the end, only you will be managing and paying back your debt.
 
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