JustSomeRandomGuy

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Ok guys, here’s the deal:

I applied to my state MD school (AR), with excellent reference letters, good shadowing experience, several research projects with two presentations and a published paper (undergrad and grad school combined), was elected to a state board by my peers, then appointed to another by the governor, I’ve worked as a Doctoral level Audiologist in the largest ENT group in the state for 5 years since graduation. But here’s where it starts to fall apart: I have a 4.0 Grad school GPA, but only a 3.2something undergrad (trending downward instead of up), although I recently took Phys 2 since I never had it and made an A. I also only made a 507 on the MCAT.

I obviously wasn’t accepted to my state MD school and am now considering my two state DO schools NYIT-AR and ARCOM.

With those stats (and a lot of other ECs), should I bother applying to the DO schools? Do I have a chance? Or is that awful undergrad performance going to haunt me forever even though I have since proven that I am capable of much better academic performance?

Any advice and input would be much appreciated! (Here’s looking at you @Goro and @Faha!)


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You are fine for many DO schools and I suggest these:
ARCOM
NYIT-AR
KCU-COM
ATSU-KCOM
DMU-COM
MU-COM
ACOM
UIWSOM
AZCOM
UP-KYCOM
WVSOM
PCOM Georgia and South Georgia
WCU-COM
LMU-DCOM
 
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Goro

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You are fine for many DO schools and I suggest these:
ARCOM
NYIT-AR
KCU-COM
ATSU-KCOM
DMU-COM
MU-COM
ACOM
UIWSOM
AZCOM
UP-KYCOM
WVSOM
PCOM Georgia and South Georgia
WCU-COM
LMU-DCOM
I agree with this list, except delete UIWSOM, LMU and WCU.

ADD: TUNCOM, all LECOMs, all VCOMs (except LA)
 
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Damson

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Ok guys, here’s the deal:

I applied to my state MD school (AR), with excellent reference letters, good shadowing experience, several research projects with two presentations and a published paper (undergrad and grad school combined), was elected to a state board by my peers, then appointed to another by the governor, I’ve worked as a Doctoral level Audiologist in the largest ENT group in the state for 5 years since graduation. But here’s where it starts to fall apart: I have a 4.0 Grad school GPA, but only a 3.2something undergrad (trending downward instead of up), although I recently took Phys 2 since I never had it and made an A. I also only made a 507 on the MCAT.

I obviously wasn’t accepted to my state MD school and am now considering my two state DO schools NYIT-AR and ARCOM.

With those stats (and a lot of other ECs), should I bother applying to the DO schools? Do I have a chance? Or is that awful undergrad performance going to haunt me forever even though I have since proven that I am capable of much better academic performance?

Any advice and input would be much appreciated! (Here’s looking at you @Goro and @Faha!)


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Dude! Appointed by governor? Incredible. So many cool people on sdn
 
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JustSomeRandomGuy

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Dude! Appointed by governor? Incredible. So many cool people on sdn

Ha! He is term limited and can’t run again, so it wasn’t really a risk for him Still super nice of him to do it though!


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sw99

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JustSomeRandomGuy said:
Ok guys, here’s the deal:

I applied to my state MD school (AR), with excellent reference letters, good shadowing experience, several research projects with two presentations and a published paper (undergrad and grad school combined), was elected to a state board by my peers, then appointed to another by the governor, I’ve worked as a Doctoral level Audiologist in the largest ENT group in the state for 5 years since graduation. But here’s where it starts to fall apart: I have a 4.0 Grad school GPA, but only a 3.2something undergrad (trending downward instead of up), although I recently took Phys 2 since I never had it and made an A. I also only made a 507 on the MCAT.

I obviously wasn’t accepted to my state MD school and am now considering my two state DO schools NYIT-AR and ARCOM.

With those stats (and a lot of other ECs), should I bother applying to the DO schools? Do I have a chance? Or is that awful undergrad performance going to haunt me forever even though I have since proven that I am capable of much better academic performance?

Any advice and input would be much appreciated! (Here’s looking at you @Goro and @Faha!)


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Why do you want to go into medicine? Do you have a clear answer for this? 'Cause it didn't come through in your post...how much shadowing do you have? How much volunteering? What about your other ECs? Try to be more well-rounded and incorporate some non-traditional extracurricular activiites. Just my $.02.
 
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JustSomeRandomGuy

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Why do you want to go into medicine? Do you have a clear answer for this? 'Cause it didn't come through in your post...how much shadowing? How much volunteering? What about your other ECs? Try to be more well-rounded and incorporate some non-traditional extracurricular activiites. Just my $.02.

I had a meeting with a member of the AdCom at the school I applied to after I was not accepted; she mentioned several of the things you did. The majority of my shadowing is, of course, with the ENTs I work with. I have other shadowing experience but it is with other surgical sub-specialties (Otology, Cardiothoracic surgery, etc.), with only a few hours in primary care. She emphasized that since my state is in dire need of primary care physicians, I need much more PC shadowing experience (with the added benefit that I will see more of how a physician manages a patient’s care, than just observing technical surgical skills). I get that, and I am going to do it, but the majority of my ENT shadowing hours are not operations, but in the clinic. However, I digress.

I always thought I wanted to go to medical school through all of middle and high school, but I got a bit burnt out on school during college (hence the awful GPA). I pursued Audiology thinking it would give me the satisfaction of seeing my own patients, managing their vestibular and auditory issues, and resolving the problems that were fixable. However, all it did was solidify the desire I had for medical school.

My best friend (we met in kindergarten and have been close ever since), is a PCP in town and the satisfaction he has is another driving factor for my decision to apply.

Is healthcare all roses and rainbows? No. Is the ever-evolving face of healthcare wildly frustrating for providers and patients alike? Yes. But is it still worth it? I believe so.

The trust earned, the relationships forged, the bonds built, the issues managed and resolved, the change to make a lasting and life-changing difference are reasons I would like to pursue medicine.


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JustSomeRandomGuy

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Why do you want to go into medicine? Do you have a clear answer for this? 'Cause it didn't come through in your post...how much shadowing? How much volunteering? What about your other ECs? Try to be more well-rounded and incorporate some non-traditional extracurricular activiites. Just my $.02.

I got caught up in the why medicine question and completely forgot to address the ECs and volunteering.

ECs include, during grad school, student council, student government, dean’s editorial committee, and after grad school, VP or education for state academy, then President of academy, then past-President, appointed to board of examiners twice by state governor, teach classes twice a week at a Bible school at my church, my wife (APN-DNP student) and I also remodel and sell historic homes on the side

Volunteering: tutor and teach online classes for kids at my old high school, work with the college/career age kids at my church, head lighting director for my church (3000+ every week in three services plus two large events each year with 5-6k attendees), a couple free clinics, I precept two grad students in clinic every semester (for the school were I attended grad school and got rejected for med school), and a few other things I’m sure I’m missing


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sw99

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JustSomeRandomGuy said:
I had a meeting with a member of the AdCom at the school I applied to after I was not accepted; she mentioned several of the things you did. The majority of my shadowing is, of course, with the ENTs I work with. I have other shadowing experience but it is with other surgical sub-specialties (Otology, Cardiothoracic surgery, etc.), with only a few hours in primary care. She emphasized that since my state is in dire need of primary care physicians, I need much more PC shadowing experience (with the added benefit that I will see more of how a physician manages a patient’s care, than just observing technical surgical skills). I get that, and I am going to do it, but the majority of my ENT shadowing hours are not operations, but in the clinic. However, I digress.

I always thought I wanted to go to medical school through all of middle and high school, but I got a bit burnt out on school during college (hence the awful GPA). I pursued Audiology thinking it would give me the satisfaction of seeing my own patients, managing their vestibular and auditory issues, and resolving the problems that were fixable. However, all it did was solidify the desire I had for medical school.

My best friend (we met in kindergarten and have been close ever since), is a PCP in town and the satisfaction he has is another driving factor for my decision to apply.

Is healthcare all roses and rainbows? No. Is the ever-evolving face of healthcare wildly frustrating for providers and patients alike? Yes. But is it still worth it? I believe so.

The trust earned, the relationships forged, the bonds built, the issues managed and resolved, the change to make a lasting and life-changing difference are reasons I would like to pursue medicine.


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What is Otology?

JustSomeRandomGuy said:
the majority of my ENT shadowing hours are not operations, but in the clinic.
This still counts, you know
JustSomeRandomGuy said:
I always thought I wanted to go to medical school through all of middle and high school, but I got a bit burnt out on school during college (hence the awful GPA). I pursued Audiology thinking it would give me the satisfaction of seeing my own patients, managing their vestibular and auditory issues, and resolving the problems that were fixable. However, all it did was solidify the desire I had for medical school.
You're all over the place. You need to COMMIT to whatever it is that you're going to do.
JustSomeRandomGuy said:
But is it still worth it? I believe so.
You don't know until you try.
 

sw99

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JustSomeRandomGuy said:
I’m open to trying anything you guys think will help improve my odds!!!
Again, I don't want to sound like a jerk, but your ECs do not show commitment to medicine.Try to amp up your free clinic hours (I know that w/everything going on, that will be difficult, but perhaps you can participate in telemedicine or something?) You still didn't say how many hours you spent shadowing--it's crucial to have at least 50, just FYI.
 

JustSomeRandomGuy

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What is Otology?

This still counts, you know
You're all over the place. You need to COMMIT to whatever it is that you're going to do.
You don't know until you try.

Otology is the focused care of the ear and related issues. These surgeons specialize in specific, difficult ear cases (mastoidectomy, cochlear implant, etc.).

This is where I have trouble; everyone always says, “Medical schools want to see that you are capable of doing more than thinking about medicine. Do some ECs that round you out as a person. Learn an instrument, start a business, work for a charity.” But then they all say, “Man, these ECs don’t show that you’re focused on medicine at all.”
I’m trying to find a happy medium.

Shadowing is well over 200 hrs.


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sw99

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JustSomeRandomGirl said:
Otology is the focused care of the ear and related issues. These surgeons specialize in specific, difficult ear cases (mastoidectomy, cochlear implant, etc.).

This is where I have trouble; everyone always says, “Medical schools want to see that you are capable of doing more than thinking about medicine. Do some ECs that round you out as a person. Learn an instrument, start a business, work for a charity.” But then they all say, “Man, these ECs don’t show that you’re focused on medicine at all.”
I’m trying to find a happy medium.

Shadowing is well over 200 hrs.

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Well, if it's meant to be, then it's meant to be
 

curbsideconsult

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Otology is the focused care of the ear and related issues. These surgeons specialize in specific, difficult ear cases (mastoidectomy, cochlear implant, etc.).

This is where I have trouble; everyone always says, “Medical schools want to see that you are capable of doing more than thinking about medicine. Do some ECs that round you out as a person. Learn an instrument, start a business, work for a charity.” But then they all say, “Man, these ECs don’t show that you’re focused on medicine at all.”
I’m trying to find a happy medium.

Shadowing is well over 200 hrs.


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As a non-trad, it's more than ok for you have lots of different ECs. You have 10 years of life experience after undergrad and it would be weird if you didn't. The criticism comes when you don't have enough activities to show people you really want to be a physician. Your ECs/volunteering paint a picture of a religious studies PhD applicant.

A few other questions/notes:
  • Did you apply to only 1 school? If so, that was likely your biggest problem.
  • You might have to retake some prereqs because it sounds like they may be 10+ years old now. You may want to retake some of them anyway in order to show an upward trend. Unfortunately your grad GPA doesn't make up for a downward undergrad trend.
  • How many free clinic hours did you do? Your service-to-the needy hours need to stand out over your church hours.
  • Speaking of church hours: many people expect church hours to be in service-to-the-needy, not only service to congregants. You need to majorly up-play the other volunteer hours to be on par with your church hours or downplay your church hours.
 

JustSomeRandomGuy

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As a non-trad, it's more than ok for you have lots of different ECs. You have 10 years of life experience after undergrad and it would be weird if you didn't. The criticism comes when you don't have enough activities to show people you really want to be a physician. Your ECs/volunteering paint a picture of a religious studies PhD applicant.

A few other questions/notes:
  • Did you apply to only 1 school? If so, that was likely your biggest problem.
  • You might have to retake some prereqs because it sounds like they may be 10+ years old now. You may want to retake some of them anyway in order to show an upward trend. Unfortunately your grad GPA doesn't make up for a downward undergrad trend.
  • How many free clinic hours did you do? Your service-to-the needy hours need to stand out over your church hours.
  • Speaking of church hours: many people expect church hours to be in service-to-the-needy, not only service to congregants. You need to majorly up-play the other volunteer hours to be on par with your church hours or downplay your church hours.

Thanks for the advice!

Funny you say that about religious studies PHD, as that was the other route I considered when weighing out medicine vs PHD.

I did only apply to one school, my state MD school; I had REALLY good letters from 3 alum, one current program director who was my major professor in grad school, and two other current professors I had in grad school. I also didn’t want to move as I have very strong ties to the area and my wife is one year into a three year doctoral program in nursing at the same school here in town.

However, in retrospect, it seems everyone on here applies to 10-20 schools, and I should have done the same.

Many of our church activities are with the needy (food banks, mowing/raking for elderly, visiting shut-ins, running bus routes to pick up kids from underprivileged neighborhoods and feeding/teaching them on Sundays, etc.), but I get what you are saying for sure; more non-church hours in a more medically focused setting.

Really all of this may actually be for the best. The more I learn about DO school, the better fit it sounds like for me. The OMM concept is fascinating, as is the whole treating body, mind, and spirit idea (really resonates with me as a religious person).

I did talk to the MD school admissions director about retaking classes and she steered me away from that (which I thought was a bit odd), but she said it would be more a waste of time than improving other areas. I will have to take Ochem 2, as I never took that in undergrad, but that shouldn’t be a huge ordeal.

Thanks again for the advice!


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