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Negative pH??!

Discussion in 'DAT Discussions' started by Predentknight, Jun 16, 2008.

  1. Predentknight

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    I just took a Kaplan practice test today.. As I was reviewing Kaplan claims that pH can exist as a negative value. I thought the pH scale was 1-14... has anyone came across somehting like this>?

    Also "osims" test # 2 , arent red blood cells replenished form bones that are apart of the appendicular skeleton, not the axial skeleton as this refers to the skull and such...this has been bugging me can some give 100% confirmation on this
     
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  3. osimsDDS

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  4. Predentknight

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    Appreciate thanks man. Thanks for the extra practice as well.
     
  5. bumpski20

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    for the neg ph's...acids can def have them. for example, whats the ph of 10M HCl?

    -1
     
  6. osimsDDS

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    holy crap 10M HCl, contact with that and your skin will peal right to the bone...owe haha
     
  7. doc toothache

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    #6 doc toothache, Jun 16, 2008
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2008
  8. DRHOYA

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  9. DRHOYA

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    Oh man! I'm totally confused now, because I know the axial skeleton in adults makes up the skull, spine, pectoral/pelvic girdles, rib-cage, but I always thought RBCs, and leukocytes were produced in the long-bones of the appendicular skeleton, such as the femur???? These long bones contain red and yellow marrow, and I thought the red was responsible for this process and is regulated by para-thyroid hormone and calcitonin, and the yellow marrow was mostly adipose tissue??
     
  10. osimsDDS

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    Hmmm let me think about this in a logical point of view, if your RBC were maid from the long bones in your body, like ur femur, logically those people who get their legs or arms amputated dont produce RBC anymore?? see what iam getting to, if the adult human makes RBC in their axial skeleton which there is no way if you get rid of you spinal cord or any axial skeleton you are dead...I dunno if this makes sense but i thought about it logically. I will double check again if it is axial or appendicular
     
  11. DRHOYA

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    Yeah that is a very good point, and it does make sense from that point of view. I'm confused, b/c what you said makes perfect sense, but then in Schaum's bio page 321 it says "erythrocytes and other formed blood elements are produced in the soft red marrow making up the core of the long bones". Then KAPLAN goes on saying that yellow/red marrow is filled with adipose/blood cell formation. Idk man. Maybey they are referring to all bones in general have this potential b/c you make a valid point about amputees.
     
  12. DentalDeac

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    See this http://www.nsbri.org/HumanPhysSpace/focus3/erythropoiesis.html
    The term erythropoiesis (erythro = RBC, and poiesis = to make) is used to describe the process of RBC formation or production. In humans, erythropoiesis occurs almost exclusively in the red bone marrow. (The yellow bone marrow is primarily composed of fat, but, in response to a greater need for RBC production, the yellow bone marrow can turn to red marrow.) The red bone marrow of essentially all bones produces RBCs from birth to about five years of age. Between the ages of 5 to 20, the long bones slowly lose their ability to produce RBCs. Above age 20, most RBCs are produced primarily in the marrow of the vertebrae, the sternum, the ribs, and the pelvis. Let's examine how RBCs are produced and, ultimately, how they are destroyed.
     
  13. osimsDDS

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    Nice job...pretty important stuff, nice research to find the answer i applaud you. And now we know the real answer and wont ever forget it...
     

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