Sep 16, 2014
18
3
Status
Medical Student
Starting this up for the current year. Please add to this thread!

MUSC - 6 categorical spots including 1 neuro/psych -- possibly expanding to 7 for co 2015

Work-life balance - PGY-2's work ~ 7 a.m. to check out at 5:30 on gen neuro and stroke services. Nightfloat for call. Other services seem more relaxed. Residents were happy, had an excellent team atmosphere and were very close knit.

Location - Charleston - Historic and beautiful city, with something for everyone. They have a MLS team, baseball, and even hockey teams. Food scene is pretty decent, with occasional "restaurant weeks." Night life seems average-good with a nice mix of classic and eccentric bars/pubs - although I only went to one so I can't comment that much on this. Great place for an active lifestyle - you can run throughout the city and along the harbor for some stunning scenery. Beaches are ~20-30 mins away. Property prices are actually surprisingly low, heard of 750 for a 2 BR apt.

Mentorship/education - Teaching is very prized at MUSC. They are actually developing a resident elective-based course that teaches residents teaching. Med students also go to neuro specific sim lab and have LP dummies to practice on- thought this was kinda unique. Admin. is very open to feedback and just recently started a relatively unique neurohospitalist fellowship based on resident suggestions. Otherwise stroke is, without a doubt, king here. If you're sold on vascular stuff - definitely look into MUSC. They've been involved with many of the integral stroke trials of late and boast the nation's fastest door to needle time for tPA - 28 mins if I remember correctly. Other than stroke, epillepsy and behavioral seem pretty strong here; not sure about movement or others. Their neurocritical care PD recently left for UAB- but MUSC has had the NCC program since 2004. Staff and residents claim that all fields are represented well here, and their stroke reputation does not jeopardize learning of other subspecialties. pgy2-4 have some type of scholarly activity every year, can be small or large scale. Lot's of basic science rsch on campus as well. Residents go into both private and and academia. Seems like 50-75% in academia recently. Chair came from UCLA 3 yrs ago and is very dedicated to expanding the program in every direction.

Atmosphere - Happy, laid back residents. Mix of married, kids/single,dating. Admin. staff and attendings were super down to earth. People in the city have a typical southern charm. Rec center boasts a 50m olympic pool and rooftop tennis court

Overall strengths of the program in my opinion - STROKE. Friendly neuro faculty dedicated to education, fun, down to earth residents. Dynamic program based on resident feedback. Nice, livable city.

Cons- interiors of hospitals seemed a little cramped and aged. Outpatient clinics were nothing to write home about. Still some concern on my part of representation of certain specialties. Meals are only sporadically provided, although there is some form of monthly credit. Parking seemed to be an issue of contempt among residents..
 
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Apr 24, 2014
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Bumping this for the people who may not know this thread exists as it's gotten buried.

Now that interview season is in full swing, I'm hoping people would like to share their experiences so far, as last year's thread was incredibly valuable.
 
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enterthepanda

5+ Year Member
May 6, 2010
31
2
Status
Medical Student
Northwestern - recently increased from 6 advanced to 8 advanced with 6 guaranteed PGY-1 spots
Work-life balance - Very front-loaded program. PGY2 is reportedly more difficult than intern year, although with the increase in resident number, hopefully it'll lighten up for everyone.
Location - North Chicago, really nice area and you have the lake on one side and Michigan Ave on the other, tons of restaurants, etc. Pretty expensive for a 1BR near the hospital, like $1500, but you can also live a bit away. Also the hospital is super nice, all private rooms, lots of wood floors and giant windows.
Mentorship/education - subspecialties are well-represented all around, and all the residents go on to do a fellowship. There are tons of didactics, which the residents say is protected time and attend. Newish chair and PD, both of whom seem to want to push the program towards more academic medicine; right now 1/3 of graduates do academic medicine.
Atmosphere - very nice group, but some of the residents looked tired.
Overall - seems like an overall nice program, residents were nice but seemed more serious than other residents I've met, could have growing pains with new increase in size and newish leadership.
 
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Nov 22, 2014
1
1
UAMS Neurology, Little Rock, AR

4 categorical spots.
Work-Life- 7 AM- 5.00 PM. Has night float. Residents seemed to have life outside work. Front-loaded program but PGY4 is nicely set up.

Pros- Very friendly. Residents were happy. Majority go into fellowships. PD is friendly, helpful and very strong resident advocate. Has made several positive changes. Residents have good number of publications and research but not research heavy program. Great didactics. Relatively cheap city. Met 5 faculty members on interview all very nice. Even had small gifts for us. Almost all sub-specialties are well-represented. Decent sized Stroke, Epilepsy and neuromuscular divisions.

Cons- No fellowship. Though they were talking of possibility in future. City is spread out but has lots of things to do outdoors.

Overall- Very nice moderate size program. Surprisingly impressive. Loved the atmosphere and looks like people are having fun.
 
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Feb 16, 2015
13
4
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Hi! I am an IMG and am these days working on my rank list..
My interview at UAB was on the 22nd of Jan
Birmingham, Alabama
they have 6 categorical seats and will be adding the 7th one soon (but in 2016)
Pros: categorical.. good mix of IMGs and AMGs.. well represented in almost all sub specialties.. all residents very happy and meet outside the hospital very frequently..excellent board passing and RITE exam scores..5/6 residents doing a fellowship from UAB coming year.. front loaded in 2nd year..free food daily!

Cons: CITY CITY CITY
 
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Feb 16, 2015
13
4
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Medical Student (Accepted)
did anybody interview at UT Houston and UT San Antonio
I would love to hear about their experience and thoughts about these programs
 
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Dharma

7+ Year Member
Aug 12, 2010
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The Path of the Righteous, man.
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Pretty darn quiet around here. Best bet is to search the old threads (where people actually stepped up and offered some perspectives). Lame representation by this year's class…
 

RedWings

7+ Year Member
Jun 18, 2010
19
1
Status
Medical Student
Indiana University-6 categorical spots/year.

Work-life balance: Not overly different from many other programs. Front-loaded. Residents seem extremely happy and I didn't get a sense that anyone was burned out. They have several hospitals and a people-mover connecting them.

Location: Indianapolis is a really cool city. Very safe. Lots of stuff to do. Rent is pretty reasonable for a big city. Not a whole lot of ethnic food, though. Mostly pizza and steakhouses. The facilities are pretty incredible. They have a new hospital which is just stunning.

Teaching: Lots of didactics and the faculty seem to really enjoy teaching. Most departments are well represented.

Atmosphere: The residents were all really nice and laid-back, as were the attendings. No one seemed to be overly stressed out and the residents appeared genuinely happy.

Pros: Great city, low cost of living, beautiful facilities, great residents and faculty. Lots of elective options and good fellowships.

Cons: Not too big on research, so if you're looking for a program that's really strong with grants aplenty, this might not be the one for you.
 
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OP
T
Sep 16, 2014
18
3
Status
Medical Student
Here goes.. I'll add my thoughts on some more programs and hopefully that will encourage others.. You can find specifics on call schedule and spots/yr on their website since I really can't remember some of them at this point. Feel free to ask questions about any specifics.

UAB

Strong clinical and research program. A slightly smaller version of WashU IMO. I think given the size of the hospital and neurology being one of the busiest services in the hospital, they could afford to add at least another resident spot (currently 6), which they might be doing in 2016. Most specialties are fairly well represented here. Stroke has a fair number of newer attending and currently no director since the prior one left, but residents are very comfortable w/ stroke and don't lack for tpa experience. They are expanding their NICU to 30+ beds. PGY2s looked slightly more tired than at some other programs, but morale was pretty high.

Pros: Well balanced program with diverse residents in a very easy to live city
cons: Birmingham may not be for everyone, although some may be surprised by it; I think they should have 7+ residents

WashU

Extremely well represented in all specialties. Chair is super research focused but PDs and residents are a refreshing mixed bag. Very personalized curriculum with 13 (i think) months of electives in last 2 yrs. Comes at a cost.. PGY2 is like the super ultra frontload of all residencies that goes with their philosophy of learning by doing.. I think it's like q4 call for a lot of the year and they also have nightfloat. Then you still have to take a fair amount of call in PGY3 and 4. Residents were actually really friendly and didn't seem overworked. They enjoyed the curriculum and even argued against proposed changes to call burden. Last year they saw 13 cases of CJD and a lot of other weird stuff. The educator, global health, research tracks seemed well established and not like second thoughts as in some programs.

Pros: sizable, diverse, well respected program. Research opptys abound.
Cons: Don't really know much about the city, but some parts along the public transport were not so endearing. Kind of felt indifferent to the city. Call schedule may be +/- depending on your view. 6 weeks psych- wtf? Mixed handwritten notes + EMR

UTSW

Another largish program program that recently opened a brand new hospital at the end of last year and has another shiny new composition of blocks springing up sometime this year (if it already hasn't). My impressions of call and work burden seemed similar to WashU, maybe a little less. I personally didn't connect that well with the residents, but I really liked the faculty that I talked to and the new-ish chair's interests in neuromodulation. Large hispanic patient pop.. some residents hinted at spanish language being invaluable, others said it didn't really matter. I really liked Dallas as a city, though- organized and slightly less traffic burden than Houston. The neurology faculty seemed to represent all fields fairly well.

Pros: another sizable hospital with a fair case load (learning by doing), ~$ 2B in new facilities, enthusiastic faculty, nice city
cons: residents seemed turned off, although I did interview later in the year

Baylor

Everyone's heard the rumors of malignancy. We even talked about them during the interview day! The residents and faculty assure things are running much better with more input, but like the other 2 above programs, expect to work your hiney off. This is probably partly due to having to cover a larger hospital system. Residents seemed very intelligent and capable, but you could tell they weren't there to screw (or joke) around. Some cool ICP rsch going on with NASA. Of course with a larger hospital system you also have a pretty nice representation of each specialty and access to MD anderson, largest VA in the US, etc..

Pros: Working at the texas medical center
cons: working at the texas medical center, didn't seem overtly malignant but I sensed a certain need for warm bodies, didn't love Houston- but it is relatively easy to live in other than traffic.

Utah

One of the smaller hospital systems (by # of beds) that I visited, yet they still have 7 residents/yr who all were personable and didn't seem overworked. Call schedule was very reasonable. Because of the location, the hospital draws from a large catchment area. It was difficult actually rating the program because the location itself is a boon to anyone who enjoys outdoor recreation and the city (IMO) is one of the nicest- if not the nicest- mid sized cities that I have ever visited. Even so, the chair seemed adamant about pushing the program in all directions. For a "smaller" hospital, I found that the neuro dept. was relatively diverse and very interested in resident feedback. Unique thing was that PGY1 MICU time was replaced with NICU.

Pros: diverse program for the size of hospital, liked the residents and city
Cons: Initially concerned about LDS religion, but it seems like it is dwindling in salt lake city and probably wouldn't be an issue in most peoples' lives; some concern for patient diversity as Utah is mostly white.

UVa

Super easy-going and friendly style of smaller southeastern city; also a smaller program. Huge emphasis on teaching. Residents and faculty were pleasant and I got a sense that one would learn a lot from great teachers as is evident by IMO good matches for fellowship. Research is also present, to a degree. The city is small, but has a surprising amount of history and things to do. It's quite beautiful out there as well. Best intl opptys of all the places I visited: well setup experiences in New Zealand, London (Queen Square), and others.

Pros: great quality of life, liked the residents, enjoyed attitude toward teaching
cons: city may be small for some

Wake Forest

Residents were quite nice talked a lot about how they had autonomy and got to do tons of procedures (tpa, injections, etc). Faculty were a mixed bag, but there was definitely not a research focus. Hospital facilities left something to be desired. All in all, it seemed like an about average program that had good representation in specialties, but I had a hard time picking anything that stood out from other programs. Don't know much about Winston Salem, but seems like a nice, southeastern city.

Pros: good representation in most specialties
Cons: nothing stood out

Ohio State

Size-wise I would liken OSU to UAB, and seemed pretty similar in a lot of ways. Residents were a nice, diverse bunch. Program itself seemed diverse with even a neuro-otologist onboard. The faculty were all very nice, I just had a hard time imagining myself living and working in an area so much dominated by football. Heard stories of streets shutting down because the nearby stadium got so much traffic. Columbus seemed like a nice city.

Pros: well represented group of residents and faculty
Cons: location? many nearby large hospitals, although they claim it doesn't influence their case load or diversity

U Louisville

Smaller program with most residents being IMGs from India/Pakistan. The residents were nice and intelligent, although somewhat hard to relate to. Faculty seemed to nice and pushing the program/hospital forward. Louisville from what I hear is an up and coming place, but I didn't have much chance to explore. PD was not very enthusiastic and did not sell program well. Not a good MS representation. This was subjectively probably the weakest program I visited.

UC Davis

Checked it out due to the location and absolutely loved the faculty, but did not connect with the residents at all, as in, I was shocked (and slightly embarrassed for them) at some of the things coming out of their mouths.

Pros: location, fairly nice hospital, faculty
cons: residents

Barrow/St. Joe's

Pleasantly surprised by this program that is a private neurological organization. Pretty busy inpatient service but the residents all loved their training. Extremely well known for the NSGY caseload which lends some interesting cases to Neuro. Even though NSGY literally partially runs Barrow, the two services get along well. There is still a substantial nonsurgical caseload including the zebras that other programs mention. ~80 NICU beds, making it one of the biggest units in the US. Possibly the best and newest outpatient buildings I have seen. MS and cog seemed weaker here, and movement and epillepsy stronger. Not super impressed with the IM program or leadership, but it's a categorical program... Phoenix took some getting used to but IMO seems like a nice Houston.

Pros: Exquisite NSGY cases+nonsurgical stuff, nice residents and faculty, massive NICU exposure, enjoyed PHX
Cons: Missing all the green stuff? IM program although it's only 1 yr.
 
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Oct 4, 2014
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5
The way I created my rank list was to create a running list as the season went on, about 2-3 days after the interview glamour wore off and my impression of the place was both realistic and fresh. That means I didn't take massive notes on every program and my memory of finer details of each have blended. So ill just leave a few comments regarding each of them. Also feel free to correct anything I may have misremembered.

UMd
Traditionally known to be a place where stroke is king, the new chair is working really hard to get every specialty represented with multiple recent hires and a few in the pipeline. The program has one of those up-and-coming feels to it because of the progressively increasing faculty size and breadth. The residents wouldn't outright say it but you could tell they get worked hard. The PGY2's looked especially drained. But multiple showed up for dinner, which I generally view as a positive sign about work/life balance. The hospital itself is a blend of an old hospital with a new piece attached to the front and a direct connection (via over-the-street bridge) to a pretty nice VA. Because of that, the residents do a lot of rotations in the VA on the neuro consult service and outpatient clinics. They also do 2 weeks a year at a rehab center located several miles west of campus. One thing I made sure to ask about was how Hopkins affects them and apparently Maryland's EMS system is organized on a statewide basis so they don't compete for cases because it is predetermined where they should go based on symptoms. Additionally, because Hopkins is so research-oriented, usually neuro cases come to them first and then are transferred to Hopkins if the diagnosis requires an experimental lab result, etc. Exception being almost all peds neuro cases go directly to Hopkins, as reflected in their peds rotation actually being at Hopkins.

Pros: city life without typical city cost (people either love or hate baltimore), broad patient population that mostly comes to them first for workup and treatment, rapidly growing department
Cons: while advanced, the guaranteed pgy1 spots are notorious for being extremely malignant and treated very different than categoricals (read: STAY CLEAR), PD was less than impressive (the interim chair was the former PD and was much more charismatic)

UPMC
This one was a pleasant surprise. Their department has always been known to be strong but I think most assume that is based on quality of research and amount of grants within the dept. But, the program feels anything like a research-driven program. I honestly forget if they require a project, (I didn't really pay attention to that on interview trail because I think every resident should be making some kind of contribution regardless) but if it was it was nothing more than one poster at AAN during your 3 years. Meanwhile, being the behemoth system in the city and the surrounding region, they see everything. Their stroke case rate is one of the highest in the nation but they also see essentially anything and everything from the area. The residents were probably the most impressive group I met and seemed to get along well and get together outside of work with some frequency. Most impressive was the pgy1's showing up for interview day lunch even though they do no neuro rotations during intern year, and not only that but the upper levels all knew them on a personal basis, meaning they integrate everyone together from day 1. NCCU was recently taken over by a CC-trained neurologist so there are some big changes on the rotation level coming there. The intro in the morning was hosted by the PD, whom is a bit older and a younger vice-PD. The younger physician seemed to be running the operation a bit more so I have a feeling there will be a changing of the guard in the not-too-distant-future. Both were genuinely nice guys though. They also run a month-long crash course at the beginning of pgy2 in neurology to remind you of everything you've so quickly forgotten from your medical school neuro knowledge base where you have minimal clinical responsibilities and lectures for most of the days and reading assignments every night.

Pros: Stroke, research is there if you want it, Pittsburgh is another love-it-or-hate-it city, huge faculty including neuro-otologists that all residents rotate with, neuro refresher course
Cons: Geographic location of the city is something to be desired...

Georgetown
I wasn't even going to apply to this one originally because DC has a history of having bad neuro programs. I decided to anyway because i've heard great things about DC itself and GT seemed to be the best of the programs. Good thing I did, because soon after applying they signed a contract with the NIH creating a partnership and opening up the ability for 1 resident each year to enter a physician-scientist track. Not only that, but a resident can create and arrange an elective in anything through the NIH. Which is nice to be able to work with a specialist that focuses on more rare, specific diseases rather than a class of diseases. I think this arrangement is going to help bring the program back from the edge of obscurity. They rotate through 3 hospitals including a VA but apparently there is serious friction with the inpatient neurologists there and so they are slowly decreasing their rotation time there and possibly phazing it out? Residents were nice but there was something off about them at the dinner. I think they were cliquey but also felt like they were hiding something. Maybe im paranoid. PD was the most enthusiastic and well-hearted guy I met of all my interviews. I'd consider going there just for him.

Pros: new NIH affiliation, great PD
Cons: historically weak program, DC=$$$

Boston University
BUMC's unique mission/role in Boston as the safety net hospital of the city has definitely helped shaped the neuro department's mission, including 2 week trips to Haiti for neuro-specific medical outreach twice a year and plans to add an annual trip to Africa in the next 1-2 years. Additionally, because they are the safety net they get ALL the crazy pathology. Hospital is older but theyre already building a brand new one that will be open in the next year I believe. Program director seemed nice at first but during my interview was very critical of me not having connections to Boston in anyway (this was not the classic 'why here?' question). It seemed to me like he didn't want to bother with people from outside Boston. Not sure why I got an invite then...

Pros: safety net=crazy path=great learning, brand new hospital very soon, Boston is awesome (but also $$$)
Cons: PD

Mount Sinai at Beth Israel
B.I. was just bought out by Mount Sinai because they were going bankrupt. This has changed the neuro landscape a bit. The Chair was asked to move over and chair all of neurology during this merger but she refused. For now, she is serving as interim overall chair until they find a replacement. With the merger, these residents can basically do a rotation in anything. While this increased breadth is good, the bad part is you have to travel all over the city for a lot of these rotations. Seemed like this separation had the residents not knowing each other quite as well as other programs' residents. They also made it sound like, while front-loaded, they don't work all that hard. Kinda wonder if they struggle to bring in volume because of the hospital being small and now with Mount Sinai merger, why not just send the patients to the other larger and stronger hospital/department? Nice part is that leaves the residents time to actually enjoy the big apple. Combine that with some nice subsidized housing and you actually have the money to afford exploring the city. The PD was young and spunky and you could tell she worked hard to bring in a group of equally quirky and spunky residents (not labelling that a bad thing necessarily).

Pros: a lot of resources for rotations in anything youd want, subsidized housing
Cons: low volume service (as evidenced by only one service total), still on traditional call schedule

University of Rochester
PD here was another really impressive one. He sits on a lot of ACGME committees and so the program is changing alot to try to stay ahead of the requirements curve and he strives to make it a model program for other programs to compare to. This was definitely the program with the most close-knit-family feel to it (I mean, we had a wine and cheese reception at the end of the interview day!) At the same time, the residency seems to be the department focus so all the faculty is really dedicated to education. There is also a strong research backbone that is easily accessible here for anyone wanting to pursue more than the minimum. The city is a great balance of city and country life, with good cuisine and very active cultural scene (especially during spring and summer) in the city as well as almost every kind of minor league sports team and then any kind of outdoors activity just a few minutes drive out of the heart of the city (one resident owned a boat on the nearby fingerlakes). But obviously being on Lake Erie, the winters are absolutely brutal. Prelim year also seemed catered to education with an 8pt/intern cap, no nightfloat for prelims, 1/2 day of neuro clinic per week, 2 months of neuro floors, 2 months of urgent care clinic and 6 weeks of elective time

Pros: regional stroke center, PD is a big resident advocate and educator, great city for about 6 months of the year, enormous and nice hospital
Cons: city the other 6 months

Jefferson
Similar to the Umd-Hopkins relationship, so seems Jefferson's with UPenn. Most of the inner city pathology seems comes to Jefferson first and then is transferred over for experimental testing or treatment if necessary. Because Penn is so research-heavy, it seems that Jefferson has a reactionary response to be very clinically-oriented. You get essentially 11 weeks of outpatient elective as well as 5-6 weeks on their dedicated headache ward at Methodist, about 15 minutes south of Jeff by car (they have a shuttle that runs constantly). Honestly, for everything they offered at Jefferson I'm surprised its not more well known or more highly regarded. There are some giants in subspecialty fields at the program and apparently all are dedicated to teaching, which isn't always the case. They are pretty heavy on NCCU with 2 separate units in two different buildings; about 3 months between pgy2 and 3 year. Peds is during pgy3 and 4 and is down at Dupont in Wilmington, DE. PD is epilepsy and it shows with 10 weeks on the EMU and in EEG during pgy3. Residents seemed like they get crushed during pgy2 but after that the workload quickly lightens. They all seemed very happy though and very social.

Pros: strong, broad clinical education, center city philadelphia seemed pretty cool
Cons: paper notes and consults (EMR for labs and orders) and Epic coming in 2017 apparently, Peds is 40 min drive away, headache unit is 15 min drive away (but has shuttle)

NYU
This was a very appealing program. They cover 3 hospitals: private NYU hosp, public Bellevue, and the VA. This gives them neuro training in 3 different kinds of practice. Bellevue sounds like its a typical nyc hospital with nurses doing next to nothing for you. But, its a world famous hospital and residents said theyve had people spend their life savings on a flight only to land and ask to be taken to Bellevue to be evaluated by the neuro dept. So, obviously the pathology will be there. And the VA also has its own unique operating system and patient population. Very large faculty and seemingly busy dept but the chair and vice chair spent most of the morning presenting to the group or interviewing everyone individually. PD only interviewed half the group which I thought was very odd/unfair. He also didn't seem nearly as charismatic as the chair and vice chair. Research emphasis here seemed the heaviest of anywhere I interviewed, with them really pushing to establish a real project from the beginning. Residents were awesome. A group covering the VA clinic pre-gamed the dinner at a nearby bar after work. Clearly they have time to enjoy nyc but sounds like pgy2 still wears you down. NYU's hospital was pretty new and they were in the process of building even more next door. Bellevue was old. We didnt see the VA.

Pros: top-tier program of nyc with great hospitals for experience
Cons: no subsidized housing, a lot of moving between hospitals and offices during a normal work day (although all were within a 10-12 block radius)
 
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Feb 16, 2015
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Medical Student (Accepted)
UT Houston:
5 spots.. categorical.. very very very stroke heavy! u spend 4 months of first year in Neuro as well. They recently shifted to night float system. Only one resident showed up at the dinner and whined throughout the dinner ( he even said that the rest did not show up because the money used to sponsor these dinners came from their educational funds!!!).. on the day of my interview we only met one new resident who was an intern! the hospital was big and pretty but residents were clearly EXHAUSTED. almost no research opportunity for residents. scrut work like shifting patient to rehab is expected from a resident. sign off is at 530 still residents end up leaving by 7-8. Many patients speak Spanish but interpreters available in every clinic!
However.. Houston is big.. happening.. diverse!

UT SAN ANTONIO
t
iny program.. take 3 residents .. advanced but linked.. no consult service ?! (one exists but is attending one..residents do not rotate) 2 weeks vacation in intern year. Residents were friendly and happy but did admit gets very exhausting. clinic is a 5 mins drive.. but some residents just walk to that building. Another clinic building is in Downtown where you do clinic once in 2 weeks. City is military run and is a famous tourist spot but still cheap to live in!
 
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Jan 29, 2015
2
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MD/PhD Student
Starting this up for the current year. Please add to this thread!

MUSC - 6 categorical spots including 1 neuro/psych -- possibly expanding to 7 for co 2015

Work-life balance - PGY-2's work ~ 7 a.m. to check out at 5:30 on gen neuro and stroke services. Nightfloat for call. Other services seem more relaxed. Residents were happy, had an excellent team atmosphere and were very close knit.

Location - Charleston - Historic and beautiful city, with something for everyone. They have a MLS team, baseball, and even hockey teams. Food scene is pretty decent, with occasional "restaurant weeks." Night life seems average-good with a nice mix of classic and eccentric bars/pubs - although I only went to one so I can't comment that much on this. Great place for an active lifestyle - you can run throughout the city and along the harbor for some stunning scenery. Beaches are ~20-30 mins away. Property prices are actually surprisingly low, heard of 750 for a 2 BR apt.

Mentorship/education - Teaching is very prized at MUSC. They are actually developing a resident elective-based course that teaches residents teaching. Med students also go to neuro specific sim lab and have LP dummies to practice on- thought this was kinda unique. Admin. is very open to feedback and just recently started a relatively unique neurohospitalist fellowship based on resident suggestions. Otherwise stroke is, without a doubt, king here. If you're sold on vascular stuff - definitely look into MUSC. They've been involved with many of the integral stroke trials of late and boast the nation's fastest door to needle time for tPA - 28 mins if I remember correctly. Other than stroke, epillepsy and behavioral seem pretty strong here; not sure about movement or others. Their neurocritical care PD recently left for UAB- but MUSC has had the NCC program since 2004. Staff and residents claim that all fields are represented well here, and their stroke reputation does not jeopardize learning of other subspecialties. pgy2-4 have some type of scholarly activity every year, can be small or large scale. Lot's of basic science rsch on campus as well. Residents go into both private and and academia. Seems like 50-75% in academia recently. Chair came from UCLA 3 yrs ago and is very dedicated to expanding the program in every direction.

Atmosphere - Happy, laid back residents. Mix of married, kids/single,dating. Admin. staff and attendings were super down to earth. People in the city have a typical southern charm. Rec center boasts a 50m olympic pool and rooftop tennis court

Overall strengths of the program in my opinion - STROKE. Friendly neuro faculty dedicated to education, fun, down to earth residents. Dynamic program based on resident feedback. Nice, livable city.

Cons- interiors of hospitals seemed a little cramped and aged. Outpatient clinics were nothing to write home about. Still some concern on my part of representation of certain specialties. Meals are only sporadically provided, although there is some form of monthly credit. Parking seemed to be an issue of contempt among residents..

Hello,
Thank for your post.

I am an IMG and I am planning to apply to neurology this year hopefully. Can you please let me know about the average score for neurology. It might be the wrong question since I know score is not everything they look at, but based on your experience and other applicants' (you met) scores, can you shed some light please.

Thanks in advance!
 
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Jan 27, 2015
2
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Hope this can be of some help to people. I appreciated all the posts from applicants in previous years. I didn't take notes, so I can share my general feel of the programs but not specific details like call schedules. I only interviewed in the northeast.

NYU: I think this program is definitely going to become stronger with Dr. Galleta as chairman. He has recruited a lot of people from Penn and I think he will really build NYU neurology to be a top program. The PD only interviewed half the students which I found kind of strange. I wish I had the chance to meet and talk to him. Residents seemed friendly. They have a really strong epilepsy program. They rotate at NYU, Bellevue, and VA which are all within walking distance so good patient diversity. They don't offer subsidized housing. A front-loaded program.

Columbia: Clearly a top-notch program and ranked the best in NYC. It definitely had an old school vibe. Morning report was very interesting and showcased how intelligent the residents are. The residents seemed less happy than at other programs I had been at but it was a small sample size, so take with a grain of salt. Great research opportunities. It seems that residents are very well supported when they do overnights and they never feel as if they're on their own. The chief resident is a PGY-5 which means he/she is fully dedicated to the administrative side of that instead of balancing residency duties. I thought that was a huge pro. Also, its a bigger program so there's more elective time built into the schedule.

Mount Sinai: Very friendly PD. Really enjoyed meeting all of the residents at the dinner. They all seemed very close and said that despite working really hard, find time to have fun, too. Strongest specialty seems to be MS but have good representation in all specialties besides neuro-ophtho and maybe cognitive. Big change is that residents will now rotate in the NSICU (they just got Dr. Mayer from Columbia who is now heading the NSICU). Front loaded schedule. They rotate at Sinai, Elmhurst, and the Bronx VA so you have a very diverse patient population.

Cornell: Big emphasis on rotating at Sloan Kettering because of all the rare, interesting cases that make for great learning. I'm not interested in neuro-onc so this actually made me not like the program as much. Very friendly residents who say that they are worked hard but seem to be happy. Program director is relatively new to Cornell (was at a top FL program before). He seemed very supportive. Great new research institute. Some subsidized housing, one of the buildings is a luxury one (has a gym, some attendings live there) that does not seem to be subsidized.

Beth Israel Deaconess: The longest interview day I had. They describe themselves as the "friendly Harvard". Chairman said that he doesn't expect the program to change at all in the near future because he has shaped the program exactly as he'd like. He led a noon conference and I was very impressed by how much he taught in only an hour. PD not as warm as at other programs but residents seem to like him. Cognitive neurology is very strong which I didn't find at many programs. They have the Harvard name and Harvard resources. Residents seemed friendly. Front loaded program. Were very interested in shaping the interview to the interviewee's interests which I appreciated. No subsidized housing.

Albert Einstein Montefiore: Many applicants I've spoken to love this program. Personally, I didn't have a great experience but it sounds like I'm one of the few. I did not like the 2 interviewers on 1 interviewee system and felt as if my interview didn't go very well. Unfortunately, that was the only real interview--the others were group sessions, one with the chairman and one with the program director where you can ask questions. They are focused on helping form great clinical neurologists. Research was brought up but there wasn't as much an emphasis on it. Headache is a major strength. Most residents go into neurophys. Most residents live in Manhattan and commute to the Bronx via subway. PD seemed very friendly and supportive and the residents have very good things to say about him. Residents were friendly and seemed to get along well.

Thomas Jefferson: Very social group of residents. At the dinner they spoke a lot about how much fun they have outside of the hospital (and less about the program itself). Very strong in epilepsy, ICU, and headache. They have a wonderful PD and all the residents love him. 5 weeks vaca which is a nice perk. Right now they have paper progress notes. They're planning on getting epic in late 2016 or early 2017. Located in Center City which is the place you want to be in Philadelphia. Philly is a great city with cheap housing (compared to other northeast cities). I remember most of the residents saying they had a car to get to Peds rotation in Delaware but I think there is a shuttle, too.

Yale: Very strong program. I think they have a harder time attracting top residents because of the location, which the chairman actually brought up. Pros of New Haven are that it's cheap, if you have a family you can live in CT suburbs which have great schools and are beautiful, and it has easy access to NYC for weekend trips. PD is wonderful and all the residents rave about him. Vice chair also seemed very supportive. Residents seemed happy and social and it was the best attended dinner I'd been to. I really wanted to rank this program higher but wasn't sure I wanted to be in New Haven.

Penn: This was my favorite program from the interview day. PD was not showy but seemed very friendly and supportive of residents. His interview questions were very thoughtful and you could tell he really wanted to get to know the applicants. The residents seemed awesome. Really friendly, down-to-earth, but super smart. Lots of research opportunities and they have a whole research curriculum. There's a bunch of tracks for people who want to be educators, researchers, or in healthcare leadership. Tons of elective time over the three years. The categorical medicine year integrates neuro into it which was unique among the programs I visited. Most residents live in Center City which is probably a 20-30 minute commute to the hospital.
 
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TUGM

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Apr 8, 2013
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What did those of you interviewing at U of Miami think of the program this year?
 
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afugazzi

5+ Year Member
May 8, 2009
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Few more programs, sorry for the delay.

Penn: 11 spots (6 categorical + 5 advanced)
Pros: Very happy residents (seemed genuinely nice and friends with each other at the pre-interview dinner; also a bunch came and hung out with us at various times throughout the interview day and seemed very happy). Excellent clinical training and research opportunities. Firm system with multiple tracks (research, etc.) provided additional support for exploring your interests. New chair and PD seemed great (heard rumors of “the dark ages” with former leadership that doesn’t seem to be a problem now). Lots of elective time. Seems like a very supportive environment for the residents.
Cons: Paper charts!!! I heard intern (PGY-1) year is miserable. Facilities lacking. Heard that competition for faculty positions is rough.
Overall: My favorite on the interview trail. Excellent reputation and great vibes from everyone made up for the not-so-great facilities and persistence of paper charts.

Partners: 18 spots, all advanced
Pros: Very strong training and research opportunities. Nice new facilities. Boston’s awesome. Residents seemed nice. Lots of elective time.
Cons: I didn’t sense the same sort of camaraderie here that I felt at Penn/UCSF. Maybe this was due to the large program size? People seemed very intense and focused on their own thing. I was concerned about getting lost (in the abstract sense) in the program. Although the 2 main hospitals were only a few miles apart, there lacked any easy public transportation to get from one to the other (seemed like the quickest way was either to take the shuttle, which takes 30-45 minutes, or drive, which takes ~30 minutes, plus driving/parking in Boston sucks).
Overall: Very impressed; ranked very highly. Personally I felt I would benefit from a smaller environment than what I sensed I would get at Partners, which is not to say that I sensed any maliciousness there.

UCSF:
Pros: friendly residents (several hung out with us the whole day) who seemed happy. Program coordinator was super nice. Faculty really nice too. Looked like there were amazing clinical training and research opportunities. 3 hospital system (Parnassus campus, county hospital, VA) provided good variety. SF obviously fun.
Cons: Cost of living in SF outrageous (1br $2600/month in the inner sunset, $3000+ in Mission and closer into downtown) and getting worse every year. Everyone says how terrible it is to have to own and drive a car in SF, but it seems like all the residents have to with the 3 hospitals being so inconveniently located with respect to each other. Couldn’t help but notice that it has about 5 fewer months total of elective time than Partners/Penn - maybe residents stretched too thin across the hospitals?
Overall: Loved it and ranked it high as well. The inconveniences of trying to live and work in SF bumped it down a little.
 
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Oct 16, 2015
5
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Hi! I am an IMG and am these days working on my rank list..
My interview at UAB was on the 22nd of Jan
Birmingham, Alabama
they have 6 categorical seats and will be adding the 7th one soon (but in 2016)
Pros: categorical.. good mix of IMGs and AMGs.. well represented in almost all sub specialties.. all residents very happy and meet outside the hospital very frequently..excellent board passing and RITE exam scores..5/6 residents doing a fellowship from UAB coming year.. front loaded in 2nd year..free food daily!

Cons: CITY CITY CITY
whats wrong with the city?
 
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