Never done any research before, how does one get started in research?

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Osteo Dullahan
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find a PD/ Lab. Read their major focus. Email them why you're interested in that area and or how you think it'll advance your knowledge of x or be applicable. Work in lab.
 
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LyMed

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Email researchers and ask if they have time to talk about their research/have room for a volunteer.
 
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AlteredScale

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find a PD/ Lab. Read their major focus. Email them why you're interested in that area and or how you think it'll advance your knowledge of x or be applicable. Work in lab.
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Step 1: Look up professors doing research that interests you. This can usually be found on school websites. A lot of people have variation on this next part, but my rule of thumb is to look for professors that have published within the last year (2016 or 2017). They're more likely to have projects that you can work on.
Step 2: Once you have a list, e-mail them. Include your name, why you're interested in their research, and explain what you bring to the table. Attach a resume. Keep the e-mail under 200 words. Professors are busy and they don't usually like to go back and forth with "un-important" e-mails.
Step 3: If they get back to you, they'll likely want to schedule an interview where they'll talk about the projects they're doing. I recommend skimming through some of their recent papers so you have an idea of what they're talking about.
That's it! You now have research. Congrats!

*Disclaimer: Lots of professors won't e-mail you back. Take it as a rejection. In my experience, give them about 1-2 weeks maximum for a response. Good luck!
 

FistLength

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Step 1: Look up professors doing research that interests you. This can usually be found on school websites. A lot of people have variation on this next part, but my rule of thumb is to look for professors that have published within the last year (2016 or 2017). They're more likely to have projects that you can work on.
Step 2: Once you have a list, e-mail them. Include your name, why you're interested in their research, and explain what you bring to the table. Attach a resume. Keep the e-mail under 200 words. Professors are busy and they don't usually like to go back and forth with "un-important" e-mails.
Step 3: If they get back to you, they'll likely want to schedule an interview where they'll talk about the projects they're doing. I recommend skimming through some of their recent papers so you have an idea of what they're talking about.
That's it! You now have research. Congrats!

*Disclaimer: Lots of professors won't e-mail you back. Take it as a rejection. In my experience, give them about 1-2 weeks maximum for a response. Good luck!
This, with the addition that if you are doing this for free, you can be upfront asking about authorship/posters etc. If there is no authorship involved, don't do it.
 
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