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New dentist income

Biofilm preventer

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Ant new recent graduates willing to share their income, location, and personal finances in this thread.

I feel like this can help many of us future dentists see how real of a financial situation we are going to put ourselves in. Or maybe even see that the loans are not affecting eveerybody as much as people think it will.

If one feels uncomfortble sharing finances, maybe create a new account and post in this thread In order to keep yourself anonymous? I feel like it will be extrmely beneficial to see how the new dental landscape is financially.
 
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Adam_W

Adam White, DDS
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I would guess about 100k-120k. Incomes are trending downward, and it's really dependent on location. I was 100K right out, but that was 9 years ago. Reimbursements have honestly not changed much, but expenses have gone up.
 
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batman12345

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Nov 18, 2015
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I would guess about 100k-120k. Incomes are trending downward, and it's really dependent on location. I was 100K right out, but that was 9 years ago. Reimbursements have honestly not changed much, but expenses have gone up.

100k flat 9 years ago is ridiculous...and not changing much 9 years later? Insanity financially
 

Traag

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Jun 14, 2014
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People have been repeating this 120k number for over a decade now and unfortunately it's become "common knowledge," wrong or not. I feel like it's causing new grads to accept the first low-ball contract offer they get and perpetuate salary deflation as the years go on.

As a recent grad, the people I've talked to who have shared their contract have been offered the following.

Midwest:
  • 500 daily minimum OR percent production (can't remember exact % it was 32ish)
  • 150k OR 33% production
  • 50k PLUS 30% production
  • FQHCs
    • Low salary (~105k) but 30k loan repayment and benefits make it about 150k all together.
West coast:
  • 165k
  • 180k? I feel like someone told me that number but I don't really remember if it was a solid offer or a corporate "here's what we think you'll make" pitch
 
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pubhealthdent

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May 7, 2019
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Ant new recent graduates willing to share their income, location, and personal finances in this thread.

I feel like this can help many of us future dentists see how real of a financial situation we are going to put ourselves in. Or maybe even see that the loans are not affecting eveerybody as much as people think it will.

If one feels uncomfortble sharing finances, maybe create a new account and post in this thread In order to keep yourself anonymous? I feel like it will be extrmely beneficial to see how the new dental landscape is financially.

197k first year out in an FQHC. 2nd year 220k, 3rd year 268k. All in the same FQHC.

Unless you're coming out of school with less than 100k in loans, $100‐120k is not feasible. The lowest anyone in my class earned right out of school was $140k, which even that is tough with the high debt load most new grads have.

For me, being willing to move anywhere really opened up my earning potential. I had several offers around the 150-175 range, and a couple over that
 
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pubhealthdent

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May 7, 2019
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Midwest:
  • 500 daily minimum OR percent production (can't remember exact % it was 32ish)
  • 150k OR 33% production
  • 50k PLUS 30% production
  • FQHCs
    • Low salary (~105k) but 30k loan repayment and benefits make it about 150k all together.

I've never heard of an FQHC in the midwest offering a salary that low. Not even in bigger cities like STL, Des Moines, Omaha, Milwaukee or Chicago. More like $120-140k
 
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pubhealthdent

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Whats the advantage of one, and is it possible if you can please describe what it is

Its a clinic that sees mostly medicaid patients or uninsured and is funded in part by the federal government. They've got them all over the country, but are focused on low income and/or rural areas. Advantages: loan repayment, no ownership responsibilities -you are an employee of the clinic, job stability, fairly good pay at most of them.

 

Traag

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Jun 14, 2014
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I've never heard of an FQHC in the midwest offering a salary that low. Not even in bigger cities like STL, Des Moines, Omaha, Milwaukee or Chicago. More like $120-140k
That's just what was relayed to me. I thought it was low too, but they justified it with the additional benefits (I don't know the specifics). I think it was for 4 days per week but I could be wrong.
 
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anonymousdent

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Jan 25, 2020
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197k first year out in an FQHC. 2nd year 220k, 3rd year 268k. All in the same FQHC.
this is, in my opinion, is an outlier and pre-dental students shouldn't look at these numbers to justify an expensive school (unless they're willing to live in the Alaskan Bush). That is some very nice compensation for a FQHC in year 1, 2, and 3. nice job, highest I've seen/ heard. May I ask, are you lumping in loan repayment as part of your "income." are you receiving loan repayment on top of that? do you have dental students working under you license and billing under your provider number= more money?
In what region are you located? how big is the surrounding metropolitan area?
For me, being willing to move anywhere really opened up my earning potential. I had several offers around the 150-175 range, and a couple over that
the $150K range is more normal in my opinion. depends on geography
FQHCs around me are offering $150k base plus benefits.
yes, this is what pre-dental students and current dental students should view as "normal". loan repayment on top of $150k income at a FQHC is a great way to begin you career. I'd recommend many people to look into this option out of school. However, if you are a "cosmetic dentist," then you should pass.

from my experience, I knew some in a FQHC in Colorado (front range, north of Denver) in the 120K a year range. not sure if they got loan repayment on top. I know people don't like to hear the "it's regional specific" answer but they really need to swallow that pill. INCOME IS REGIONAL SPECIFIC. Colorado front range north of Denver is a very desirable location = lower pay. I remember looking at a job in the mountains (Silverthorne or Frisco I think, right in Summit county and between copper mountain, Breckenridge and keystone ski resorts. $80k was the offer. I strongly considered it, but passed.
 
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pubhealthdent

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May 7, 2019
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this is, in my opinion, an outlier and pre-dental students shouldn't look at these numbers to justify an expensive school (unless they're willing to live in the bush in Alaska). That is some very nice compensation for a FQHC in year 1, 2, and 3. nice job, highest I've seen/ heard. May I ask, are you lumping in loan repayment as part of your "income." are you receiving loan repayment on top of that? do you have dental students working under you license and billing under your provider number= more money?
In what region are you located? how big is the surrounding metropolitan area?

It absolutely is an outlier. As i said most of my offers were in the $150-175k range, which is pretty typical when looking at FQHCs in rural areas. The more urban/ metropolitan areas, in my experience, offer lower salaries than that. More in the 120-140k range. My salary is based off production (which in itself is very uncommon in the FQHC world). That number does not take into account any loan repayment or other benefits. I do not have any students I oversee. I work in the midwest, my clinic being in a town of about 2500 and a county of around 40k. The closest big city is 2 hours away
 
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theleatherwalle

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Jul 16, 2011
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This topic seems to have come up quite a bit recently. I believe 120k is still the average. i talked to my former office manger who told me they were likely going to only offer 4 day a week schedules at 100k until covid is clear at the corporate location. I fully believe you can find offers of 150k+, but they r places you likely do not want to live. Ive also seen offers for 80-100k in places like orange county/LA for full time positions.
 

Penny00

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Where you live? this is great news! Hows your debt life hindering youre personal life. Are you an associate or practice owner?

I'm currently an associate at a private office. Don't want to say exactly which city for anonymity purposes but similar to Philly/Chicago/D.C./Austin. I live in the city, but commute about 40 minutes out because in general compensation/work life is better in the suburbs vs the city.

In terms of debt, I was very lucky to have some support from family/spouse and was able to avoid higher-interest loans. I think the key thing is to continue living as if you're a student after you get your first "real job" (easier said than done!). This past year, I tried to put around $8k/month towards loans to pay them down as quickly as possible (I should be done within the next few years).

I also think it's important to carefully consider your financial situation and not just assume if you become a dentist you'll be well off. Some dental schools have crazy high tuition now and a lot of dental specialties have tuition for residency (I was undecided between ortho and peds, but ultimately ended up picking peds because I couldn't justify spending more $$ on residency when peds residency paid about 60k/yr). Also, if you're flexible on location that'll make a big difference in your income. For example, I wouldn't personally recommend taking out full loans for an expensive private school if you're planning on working as a GP in NYC or California (those areas are notoriously competitive and compensation is lower).

Despite this, I do think dentistry is a great profession! I really enjoy the flexibility and making a difference for patients. :)
 
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batman12345

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Nov 18, 2015
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I'm currently an associate at a private office. Don't want to say exactly which city for anonymity purposes but similar to Philly/Chicago/D.C./Austin. I live in the city, but commute about 40 minutes out because in general compensation/work life is better in the suburbs vs the city.

In terms of debt, I was very lucky to have some support from family/spouse and was able to avoid higher-interest loans. I think the key thing is to continue living as if you're a student after you get your first "real job" (easier said than done!). This past year, I tried to put around $8k/month towards loans to pay them down as quickly as possible (I should be done within the next few years).

I also think it's important to carefully consider your financial situation and not just assume if you become a dentist you'll be well off. Some dental schools have crazy high tuition now and a lot of dental specialties have tuition for residency (I was undecided between ortho and peds, but ultimately ended up picking peds because I couldn't justify spending more $$ on residency when peds residency paid about 60k/yr). Also, if you're flexible on location that'll make a big difference in your income. For example, I wouldn't personally recommend taking out full loans for an expensive private school if you're planning on working as a GP in NYC or California (those areas are notoriously competitive and compensation is lower).

Despite this, I do think dentistry is a great profession! I really enjoy the flexibility and making a difference for patients. :)

8k/month at student loans is awesome! Is that realistically possible to accomplish as a general dentist in those same areas? Assuming low cost of living...
 
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