Newest modalities in chronic pain management

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mjl1717

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For chronic neck and back pain...I know of epidurals, facet joint injections and trans foraminal injections..

As far as "on the cutting edge of pain management"
I also hear of facet joint fusion, endoscopic discectomy and decompressing the ligamentum flavum and even nerve stimulation.

My question is what else are the newest and most feasible modalites for pain management? :xf:

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For chronic neck and back pain...I know of epidurals, facet joint injections and trans foraminal injections..

As far as "on the cutting edge of pain management"
I also hear of facet joint fusion, endoscopic discectomy and decompressing the ligamentum flavum and even nerve stimulation.

My question is what else are the newest and most feasible modalites for pain management? :xf:

Oxycontin was reformulated recently.
 
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Oxycontin was reformulated recently.

Yes, the "Oxyneo" is on it's way to Canadia. Sounds like it belongs in the Matrix.

It will be very interesting to see what my pts make of it.
 
Oxycontin was reformulated recently.

No you have it wrong! Ive done that end of pain management before and it does not make me comfortable..Personally I could only take that 2 or 3 times a week since you often get the patient from hell.:smuggrin:

Currently I work with a group that does only procedures..Occasionally I will prescibe a Lidoderm patch..

So my question is: As far as procedures..What would be considered "cutting edge" for chronic neck and back pain..After epidurals, facet joint, and transforaminals injections have been done..

As said Ive heard of endoscopic discectomy, facet joint fusion and cutting the ligamentum flavum...But what else is considered feasible but on the cutting edge?
 
No you have it wrong! Ive done that end of pain management before and it does not make me comfortable..Personally I could only take that 2 or 3 times a week since you often get the patient from hell.:smuggrin:

Currently I work with a group that does only procedures..Occasionally I will prescibe a Lidoderm patch..

So my question is: As far as procedures..What would be considered "cutting edge" for chronic neck and back pain..After epidurals, facet joint, and transforaminals injections have been done..

As said Ive heard of endoscopic discectomy, facet joint fusion and cutting the ligamentum flavum...But what else is considered feasible but on the cutting edge?

Are you a physician, mid-level?

"Working with the group that does only procedures" Are you doing procedures yourself?
 
Are you a physician, mid-level?

"Working with the group that does only procedures" Are you doing procedures yourself?


I work as a physician assistant but I am also going for a M.D.
I do the intake part/dictation not the procedure..Althought I must let my Superiors know about anything that is cutting edge for chronic neck and back pain..
 
I work as a physician assistant but I am also going for a M.D.
I do the intake part/dictation not the procedure..Althought I must let my Superiors know about anything that is cutting edge for chronic neck and back pain..

your superiors depend on you to tell then what is new and "cutting edge" for pain?
 
your superiors depend on you to tell then what is new and "cutting edge" for pain?


They are busy and get input from all angles.. Like a wise man would..

I understand that certain conservative providers avoid certain procedures just to stay away from trouble..
 
most physicians are responsible for their own education and advancement of knowledge. unfortunately, MOC is most beneficial for those practitioners who have grandfather'd into a pain certification and who have no incentive or requirements to improve their knowledge base.


maybe your superiors should take an up to date review course (like the dannemiller review course) to find out what is considered safe and within standard of care, especially if it is to learn about procedures they dont know how to do...
 
most physicians are responsible for their own education and advancement of knowledge. unfortunately, MOC is most beneficial for those practitioners who have grandfather'd into a pain certification and who have no incentive or requirements to improve their knowledge base.


maybe your superiors should take an up to date review course (like the dannemiller review course) to find out what is considered safe and within standard of care, especially if it is to learn about procedures they dont know how to do...

Thx..Actually I wanted to go to that major pain conference in California this month..But I could not fit it in..
 
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