Apr 8, 2010
51
0
41
Status
By the time I graduate undergrad, several new schools will have opened.

As it stands, my GPA as of now is quite low, (3.2ish), but I hope to get it above a 3.50 by the time I graduate.

Are newer medical schools typically easier to matriculate into than more established ones? If so, by what margin typically?

If so, this is good news to me if I can't get into the 3.60+ range (will need to basically get non-stop As for the rest of my college career).
 

Frazier

Emergentologist
Lifetime Donor
7+ Year Member
Nov 12, 2009
4,488
1,974
181
US
By the time I graduate undergrad, several new schools will have opened.

As it stands, my GPA as of now is quite low, (3.2ish), but I hope to get it above a 3.50 by the time I graduate.

Are newer medical schools typically easier to matriculate into than more established ones? If so, by what margin typically?

If so, this is good news to me if I can't get into the 3.60+ range (will need to basically get non-stop As for the rest of my college career).
One would think so, huh?
But the schools typically beef up their sexiness by offering the initial class sensual scholarship packages to such a degree that it borders on... Well, you know.

In other words, they aren't necessarily "easy" to get into either.
 
Apr 8, 2010
51
0
41
Status
One would think so, huh?
But the schools typically beef up their sexiness by offering the initial class sensual scholarship packages to such a degree that it borders on... Well, you know.

In other words, they aren't necessarily "easy" to get into either.
I'm certain that they are by no means "easy." But, given I'd much rather get an M.D. than a D.O. (though I'm not against a D.O. if an M.D. is out of the question), a less competitive allopathic school would certainly be nice.

How much easier are newer schools to get into relative to older more established schools on average?
 

oaklandguy

Dismembered
Jul 22, 2009
3,619
4
41
On the shores of my conscious
Status
Pre-Medical
Well I know that one med-school opening in my area will probably be more competitive than other med-schools in my state just because of the scholarship deal they are offering students as well as the associated hospital being very well-established and the school being in a very upper-class suburb which features a lot of students who used to be forced to relocate for med-school, but now they will have the option to stay home.
 

TexasPhysician

Moderator
10+ Year Member
Sep 1, 2008
4,635
1,746
381
Status
Attending Physician
It is highly variable, but for the most part, I would agree that most new med schools are a little easier to get into. For students with multiple acceptances, they don't want to risk poor board scores, etc. because of a new school. No one wants to be the guinea pig.

Still, there are enough applicants out there that the average scores are pretty close. If I had to guess, on average a lower gpa of .1 and a lower MCAT of 1 point. There are just too many qualified applicants for MD programs these days.
 

ThaliaNox

10+ Year Member
Oct 18, 2008
882
2
0
Status
Medical Student
Due to the difficulty of getting loans for the first few classes, when the school is not yet fully accredited (Hasn't graduated their first class), many new schools offer full or near full scholarship. This make them awful appealling to many, even though it is an unproved school. The upside, even if the schools aren't "easier to get into" is that any new school increases the number of seats in the country, making it easier to get into any med school, on that level.

This does not neccessarily translate into lower GPA or MCAT average, but perhaps a universal lessening of MCAT and GPA "inflation" for that year.
 

Jrsharp70

...failure to communicate
Mar 26, 2010
124
0
0
Status
Medical Student
VTCSOM's inaugural class was super competitive
 

CaliGirl14

No worries.
Removed
7+ Year Member
Dec 26, 2009
8,779
9
151
How about the new UC med schools? Riverside: in 2012, and Merced in 2015
 

austinap

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Apr 21, 2006
1,028
3
0
CA
Status
How about the new UC med schools? Riverside: in 2012, and Merced in 2015

Given that they're in CA and still won't make up for the net surplus of pre-med students in the state, they'll still be super competitive, but I would imagine significantly less so than UCLA/UCSF/UCSD.
 

CaliGirl14

No worries.
Removed
7+ Year Member
Dec 26, 2009
8,779
9
151
I knew about UCR, but Merced is opening a med school too? Four years ago they were opening their undergrad doors. Woah.
That's true, but at least if you get in, they'll attract you with nice financial aid packages...hopefully :xf:
 
Last edited:

anfleisch

10+ Year Member
May 14, 2008
852
0
0
Status
Pre-Medical
What some people said: it more depends on the reputation of the previously established hospital system and possibly an established graduate school. In that case, really the only new thing would be the curriculum, which is really the case for many schools lately. I myself would be a little hesitant due to the residency directors opinions, but scholarships always turn heads.
 

MilkmanAl

Al the Ass Mod
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Mar 23, 2008
12,032
60
161
Kansas City, MO
www.facebook.com
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I'd imagine they'll be about the same as any other med school. There's no shortage of qualified applicants to fill the extra seats.
 

masturhu

MedStart
10+ Year Member
Apr 27, 2008
104
0
241
Status
Pre-Medical
Oakland University (in Michigan) is taking applications this cycle. Nobody knows how competitive any of the schools will be until after at least one cycle.
 

Brigade4Radiant

10+ Year Member
Dec 13, 2006
971
190
281
Status
Attending Physician
Also King's College is opening a new Medschool in Tenn. It is really great to be a pre-med in Tennessee lol.
 
Oct 30, 2009
639
3
41
NY
Status
Pre-Medical
By the time I graduate undergrad, several new schools will have opened.

As it stands, my GPA as of now is quite low, (3.2ish), but I hope to get it above a 3.50 by the time I graduate.

Are newer medical schools typically easier to matriculate into than more established ones? If so, by what margin typically?

If so, this is good news to me if I can't get into the 3.60+ range (will need to basically get non-stop As for the rest of my college career).
Doubt it. They'll have the same number of applicants, even if fewer want to go there.
 

oaklandguy

Dismembered
Jul 22, 2009
3,619
4
41
On the shores of my conscious
Status
Pre-Medical
Oakland University (in Michigan) is taking applications this cycle. Nobody knows how competitive any of the schools will be until after at least one cycle.
I suspect Oakland's med-school to be pretty competitive, the only downside is the price, but there will be solid scholarships. OU gave out more money in scholarships than Harvard did four years ago.
 

mspeedwagon

7+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2009
2,097
450
181
Florida
Status
Medical Student
Merced is actually opening their medical school in the Fall of 2013 NOT 2015.
I took some time to contact the schools, to get a direct answer to the question of what the stats of the inaugural classes to these two schools are anticipated to be. Both UCs gave me similar number (approx. 3.7 GPA, 32 MCAT), which is consistent with most of the other UCs. I think that might be on the low end since applicants with those stats are currently being forced out of state.

As those mentioned, while you would think that new M.D. programs would have weaker stats, they actually do not. UCF had very strong stats because they offered free tuition to their inaugural class. There are too many applicants with high stats being turned away that the averages of these new schools is still going to be around 30 MCAT, 3.5 GPA (higher for CA schools).


I knew about UCR, but Merced is opening a med school too? Four years ago they were opening their undergrad doors. Woah.
 

laxplayanumba16

Major procrastinator
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Nov 12, 2008
27
3
91
Status
Medical Student
sustentacular- some of the main points of the article relevant to this thread.

-During the past 4 years, 15 institutions have officially notified the LCME of their intent to start a new medical school. 6 have been granted preliminary accreditation, 2 have put their plans on indefinite hold.

-Commonwealth Medical College enrolled a charter class of 65 students in the summer of 2009. Despite having been awarded preliminary accreditation at a relatively late date, the school received more than 1500 applications. The school will increase its enrollment in the summer of 2011.

-VT-Carilion SOM plans maintain a class size of 40 students.
 

alexandertg6

7+ Year Member
Nov 12, 2009
484
5
151
Status
Resident [Any Field]
University of Central Florida after opening its doors was the most competitive med school in the nation because of the scholarship deal, i think it took around 45 out of 4500 applications... those are not good odds lol
 

TexasPhysician

Moderator
10+ Year Member
Sep 1, 2008
4,635
1,746
381
Status
Attending Physician
University of Central Florida after opening its doors was the most competitive med school in the nation because of the scholarship deal, i think it took around 45 out of 4500 applications... those are not good odds lol
They accepted only 45 people? So the class size is only 20ish maybe. No way every student that was accepted matriculated.
 
Jun 25, 2009
229
0
0
Status
Pre-Medical
They accepted only 45 people? So the class size is only 20ish maybe. No way every student that was accepted matriculated.
I'm pretty sure they accepted more. But since everyone was getting a full scholarship, they didn't have to accept too many. I've heard 42-43ish ended up being matriculated.

They don't have those scholarships this year though - and their class size has increased as well. Let's see how those admission stats change. When I applied this year, they told me "we will only interview approximately 325 of our 3,764 applicants for our 60 seat class"
 

TexasPhysician

Moderator
10+ Year Member
Sep 1, 2008
4,635
1,746
381
Status
Attending Physician
I'm pretty sure they accepted more. But since everyone was getting a full scholarship, they didn't have to accept too many. I've heard 42-43ish ended up being matriculated.

They don't have those scholarships this year though - and their class size has increased as well. Let's see how those admission stats change. When I applied this year, they told me "we will only interview approximately 325 of our 3,764 applicants for our 60 seat class"
Those stats are about right. If they have 60 seats, they will need to accept probably 120+. Many schools interview 3x what they plan to accept to be sure they are happy with the students they get + make sure they have plenty of students on the waitlist whom they would be happy with also.
 

littlejuan

10+ Year Member
Jul 4, 2007
289
98
271
Status
Attending Physician
University of Central Florida opened a new med school last fall. The premier class median stats were MCAT 32 and cGPA 3.78.

They also have someone with a 45.

:O



I'm pretty sure they accepted more. But since everyone was getting a full scholarship, they didn't have to accept too many. I've heard 42-43ish ended up being matriculated.

They don't have those scholarships this year though - and their class size has increased as well. Let's see how those admission stats change. When I applied this year, they told me "we will only interview approximately 325 of our 3,764 applicants for our 60 seat class"

They don't have the full-ride scholarships this year, but I recently received an e-mail from the director of admissions that says they will be able to offer some form of scholarship to every member of the incoming class.


The school itself is incredibly impressive, tuition isn't very high, they have a good track record for scholarships, and the small class sizes makes for a competitive program to get into.
 
Jul 31, 2009
1,275
45
0
Status
Our charter class for UCF is 41. As for the competition it may not have been as high as the first class but it was still fierce. Some applicants begged for a seat but when they found out they was not getting a free ride they declined. Not everyone just wants the money some people want to be close to home or just like the idea of making their mark. Once we get a set of step 1 scores more people will want to come because I know the charter class will rock.
 

MossPoh

Textures intrigue me
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Apr 24, 2006
7,990
41
151
Tally/Willkillya County
psu.facebook.com
Status
Medical Student
New schools are often just as competitive, although their admission stats wouldn't necessarily indicate such. When a school is created, they have an approved growth rate. It takes many years to get to max capacity. FSU graduated a few classes before they reached max capacity. 40 or so for a first class is a pretty standard number.

I personally rather go to a well established DO school than a brand new MD school. There are no indications of a school's age really hampering one's ability to match, but I just never liked the feeling of being the guinee pig.
 

BrainBuff

10+ Year Member
Oct 2, 2007
1,397
56
271
Status
Resident [Any Field]
I personally rather go to a well established DO school than a brand new MD school. There are no indications of a school's age really hampering one's ability to match, but I just never liked the feeling of being the guinee pig.
Hmmm..... Not trying to start a flame here, but talking about guinea pigs, most people do not even know what a DO training is all about. Anyway, good for u.
 

plauto

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Sep 16, 2007
1,056
4
141
Status
Attending Physician
New schools are often just as competitive, although their admission stats wouldn't necessarily indicate such. When a school is created, they have an approved growth rate. It takes many years to get to max capacity. FSU graduated a few classes before they reached max capacity. 40 or so for a first class is a pretty standard number.

I personally rather go to a well established DO school than a brand new MD school. There are no indications of a school's age really hampering one's ability to match, but I just never liked the feeling of being the guinee pig.
the guinea pig aspect is true, however many times for these 2 years I felt like a guinea pig myself, and my school is among the oldest....
 
Jul 31, 2009
1,275
45
0
Status
Most people that got accepted to UCF had other acceptances to MD schools. As for DO by my name it could have happened ONLY if I was rejected at all my MD choices.
 
Last edited:

wiscRD

5+ Year Member
May 6, 2010
127
0
91
Status
Medical Student
While there sounds to be many benefits to applying to a school with preliminary accreditation (aside from being the test group), but what are the risks? Do schools ever loose this preliminary accreditation? If so, what do the students do? I am interested in Oakland but am a little hesitant that they aren't fully accredited yet (this will be their first year). Is it possible I could do 3 years of school and then be SOL?
 

sciencebooks

7+ Year Member
Jul 27, 2009
802
19
151
Michigan
Status
Pre-Medical
Well I know that one med-school opening in my area will probably be more competitive than other med-schools in my state just because of the scholarship deal they are offering students as well as the associated hospital being very well-established and the school being in a very upper-class suburb which features a lot of students who used to be forced to relocate for med-school, but now they will have the option to stay home.
I'm hearing OU will be a private institution too? Even though their undegrad is public. Is this true? Ha, sorry if it's a "stupid" question. Haven't really looked into this.
 

ILikeDrugs

pre-attending
10+ Year Member
Jul 19, 2008
1,793
7
0
L.A.
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
I'm sure this has been said, just because a school is new that doesn't mean that their standards will be low. Some will make them high right off the bat to establish themselves as a "top notch" school/program even if they don't have any prior things to show for it. UCI started a business school not to long ago, and every single person that was accepted into the program had a 4.0 GPA. :rolleyes:
 
Jun 15, 2010
11
1
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Well I know that one med-school opening in my area will probably be more competitive than other med-schools in my state just because of the scholarship deal they are offering students as well as the associated hospital being very well-established and the school being in a very upper-class suburb which features a lot of students who used to be forced to relocate for med-school, but now they will have the option to stay home.
Do you think people would take a slot there over a slot at Wayne?
 

tom sdcal

10+ Year Member
May 9, 2008
13
0
0
Status
Pre-Medical
You need to remember that these new schools start off with small classes, generally about 40 seats and they add seats each year. I don't consider these newer schools any easier to get into because the limited spots allows them to be much more selective than a comparable school with 150 openings.