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NHSC scholarship

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Adapt

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I just learned about the scholarship today while looking in some threads. I understand the basic process but still have a few lingering questions if anyone can help me out.

How competitive is it meaning how many people apply vs are accepted? If you are accepted, does that mean they'll pay for the next 4 years or do you have to keep applying to see if you get it again?

Finally, I know there are various sites you can go to. I live in southern CA so I figure that there would be lots of places to practice. Would these places mainly be in downtown areas serving just the underserved or will some places be in suburban type areas? I couldn't find a list of the hospitals that you can go to so if anyone has a link to it could you please post it. Thanks.
 

Adapt

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Originally posted by mpp
site list search
I'm confused. The site you gave is a list of doctors in Gastroenterologic and General Surgery at the Mayo clinic. My question refers to hospitals for NHSC. :confused:
 

lwestfall

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From what I've gathered on the forums, about 2000 people apply for the National Health Services Corps (NHSC) Scholarship each year (app due March 26, 2004), about 1000 get interviews (in May & June), and about 300 or so get scholarships (they don't find out until around September, AFTER you've already chosen a school, which choice can be made/changed no later than July 1). According to page 12 of the newsletter in "spring2001.pdf" (last file, I think) in this directory, 40% of NHSC Scholars serve in urban sites, and the rest rural. It is pretty rare to see something "suburban" as one of their severely underserved sites. That page also shows that only about half the scholarships go to doctors (MDs and DOs; doesn't matter), while the rest go to other health professionals. That means only 150 or so MD/DO Scholars are chosen each year.

That page in that newsletter also shows that about half the Scholars are white (and about 1/4 Hispanic and 1/4 African American). Since you're Hispanic (according to your mdapplicants.com profile), you'll get extra points, since they consider you more likely to serve Hispanics. (I think all of the underserved urban sites [and lots of the rural ones too] serve populations that are largely composed of URMs.) You also get more points if you come from a disadvantaged background. Another thing that helps you demonstrate your likelihood of committing your career to underserved areas (they are looking for lifers here) is to go to a med school with a strong primary care focus/curriculum (like COMP or any other DO school and some MD schools). I think they also kinda like cheaper ("in-state") schools' tuition more than expensive (private) schools'. :)

The NHSC website has a searchable database of the jobs currently open to NHSC Scholars or LRP (Loan Repayment Program) participants. You can get an idea of what kind of sites are available if you search for FP positions for NHSC Scholars only (Health Professional Shortage Area score of 14+). There you see there are only three positions are currently available in CA, in the cities of Lake Isabella (outside of Bakersfield by the Sequoia National Forest), Calexico (down by Mexicali) and Corning (in NoCal on I-5 b/w Sacramento and Oregon). Of course, though, that is just the current list - it changes constantly depending on communities' needs.

Once you start the scholarship, you don't need to apply anymore for the following years. You can get the NHSC Scholarship for 2, 3 or 4 years, and then you owe that number of years at one of their sites after your primary-care residency (FP, IM, Peds, OB/GYN or Psych). I am set on primary care (most likely FP) for underserved areas (most likely rural), so I am currently applying and seriously hoping for the 4-year NHSC scholarship. If you think you might like to specialize, you would be locking yourself into something you might not like, though.

So anyway, good luck to you Slick and everyone else!

Peace,
Lincoln :)
 

Adapt

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Originally posted by lwestfall
From what I've gathered on the forums, about 2000 people apply for the National Health Services Corps (NHSC) Scholarship each year (app due March 26, 2004), about 1000 get interviews (in May & June), and about 300 or so get scholarships (they don't find out until around September, AFTER you've already chosen a school, which choice can be made/changed no later than July 1). According to page 12 of the newsletter in "spring2001.pdf" (last file, I think) in this directory, 40% of NHSC Scholars serve in urban sites, and the rest rural. It is pretty rare to see something "suburban" as one of their severely underserved sites. That page also shows that only about half the scholarships go to doctors (MDs and DOs; doesn't matter), while the rest go to other health professionals. That means only 150 or so MD/DO Scholars are chosen each year.

That page in that newsletter also shows that about half the Scholars are white (and about 1/4 Hispanic and 1/4 African American). Since you're Hispanic (according to your mdapplicants.com profile), you'll get extra points, since they consider you more likely to serve Hispanics. (I think all of the underserved urban sites [and lots of the rural ones too] serve populations that are largely composed of URMs.) You also get more points if you come from a disadvantaged background. Another thing that helps you demonstrate your likelihood of committing your career to underserved areas (they are looking for lifers here) is to go to a med school with a strong primary care focus/curriculum (like COMP or any other DO school and some MD schools). I think they also kinda like cheaper ("in-state") schools' tuition more than expensive (private) schools'. :)

The NHSC website has a searchable database of the jobs currently open to NHSC Scholars or LRP (Loan Repayment Program) participants. You can get an idea of what kind of sites are available if you search for FP positions for NHSC Scholars only (Health Professional Shortage Area score of 14+). There you see there are only three positions are currently available in CA, in the cities of Lake Isabella (outside of Bakersfield by the Sequoia National Forest), Calexico (down by Mexicali) and Corning (in NoCal on I-5 b/w Sacramento and Oregon). Of course, though, that is just the current list - it changes constantly depending on communities' needs.

Once you start the scholarship, you don't need to apply anymore for the following years. You can get the NHSC Scholarship for 2, 3 or 4 years, and then you owe that number of years at one of their sites after your primary-care residency (FP, IM, Peds, OB/GYN or Psych). I am set on primary care (most likely FP) for underserved areas (most likely rural), so I am currently applying and seriously hoping for the 4-year NHSC scholarship. If you think you might like to specialize, you would be locking yourself into something you might not like, though.

So anyway, good luck to you Slick and everyone else!

Peace,
Lincoln :)
Thanks Lincoln. That was really helpful and cleared up a lot of things. So only 3 locations in CA huh? Not that many. Also, the 150 out of 2000 makes it seem very competitive.

Also, you know which profile is mine on mdapplicants.com!? Wow that's kind of scary. I guess I post too much information about myself on SDN. :laugh:

For the record, I'm part hispanic and part filipino, but you're right that I would want to help out hispanics especially. I'll have to decide if I'll apply or not. Thanks again.
 

racecity1

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If you are serious, there is much more information at
http://nhscscholar.com , it is an unofficial website detailing the program. It is geared towards fnp's, but it will link you up with things like the contract the vendor who serves the scholars goes by (the nhsc does VERY little, it is all the vendor who won the contract who runs everything). The site lists placement rates and what is supposed to happen. Doctors have it pretty good, compared to np's, so take in the site with a grain of salt. My best advice is not to trust the opportunities list, call a couple of the openings and see for yourself. good luck
 
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