Alma1989

5+ Year Member
Feb 12, 2013
103
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I'm 23 years old, and I graduated from film school a year and a half ago with a Bachelors of Fine Arts and 3.9 GPA (Magna cumme laude). I only took a single chemistry class in college. I have been working freelance and interning in the film industry (low of my jobs are very short-term, like less than three months, that's the nature of the industry) and as such don't have long-lasting references. As a result of working in the industry, I don't have any science or medical experience and only recently started volunteering.

I'd like to get into a post-bacc, but given my record, is it pointless to even try to apply? Should I aim to get my pre-reqs done at a community college, build up my resume a little more and matriculate next year? I live in Los Angeles, and applications for formal programs (ex. CSULA) are due really soon.
 
Oct 5, 2012
91
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Medical Student
A lot of Post-Baccs are labeled as "career changer" programs, designed for people with little to no academic experience in the science pre-reqs for med school. Given just that, I don't think not having taken any of those courses undergrad should deter you from applying.

A few caveats though... For most programs it's always better to apply on the earlier side of the application cycle and it's pretty late into this year's cycle (assuming you wanted to apply to start this summer/fall). Also, while you're not expected to have much academic experience or even much of a medical background, you need to be able to sufficiently defend your choice to pursue medicine (whether it be in your personal statement, EC, interviews etc.) If you had your heart set on a formal program, it may not be a horrible idea to spend the rest of the year getting some shadowing and additional volunteer work done and then apply next year.

Hope that helps, best of luck to you.
 

robflanker

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Feb 17, 2009
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A lot of Post-Baccs are labeled as "career changer" programs, designed for people with little to no academic experience in the science pre-reqs for med school. Given just that, I don't think not having taken any of those courses undergrad should deter you from applying.

A few caveats though... For most programs it's always better to apply on the earlier side of the application cycle and it's pretty late into this year's cycle (assuming you wanted to apply to start this summer/fall). Also, while you're not expected to have much academic experience or even much of a medical background, you need to be able to sufficiently defend your choice to pursue medicine (whether it be in your personal statement, EC, interviews etc.) If you had your heart set on a formal program, it may not be a horrible idea to spend the rest of the year getting some shadowing and additional volunteer work done and then apply next year.

Hope that helps, best of luck to you.
+1, good post

OP - You need to explain why you like medicine which based on your first post isn't apparent.
And never do classes at a CC - the only time that should be an option is if you have a terrible GPA and need to learn how to study. They should not be used for medical school admissions
 
OP
Alma1989

Alma1989

5+ Year Member
Feb 12, 2013
103
145
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
+1, good post

OP - You need to explain why you like medicine which based on your first post isn't apparent.
And never do classes at a CC - the only time that should be an option is if you have a terrible GPA and need to learn how to study. They should not be used for medical school admissions
Independently from my job, I have a tremendous fascination with science and the human body and have spoken to doctors and find they have a lot of satisfaction with their jobs. It's obviously cliche to say, but I like helping people and additionally feel inclined to help people who are afraid and sick (but obviously, as I've said with my original post, I don't have any hospital or clinical experience, so I'm not a hundred percent certain).

Thank you for your insight about community colleges. However, I find it not preferable to sit out the summer/fall months if I don't apply to a formal program. What would you think would be a better alternative?
 

robflanker

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Feb 17, 2009
3,031
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Independently from my job, I have a tremendous fascination with science and the human body and have spoken to doctors and find they have a lot of satisfaction with their jobs. It's obviously cliche to say, but I like helping people and additionally feel inclined to help people who are afraid and sick (but obviously, as I've said with my original post, I don't have any hospital or clinical experience, so I'm not a hundred percent certain).
So essentially, no, you do not have a good reason.

Step 1 - get one

Thank you for your insight about community colleges. However, I find it not preferable to sit out the summer/fall months if I don't apply to a formal program. What would you think would be a better alternative?
I don't know what to tell you. Community colleges arent held in the same regard as 4 year schools. Yes, they are acceptable, but its perceived (rightly or not is irrelevant) as taking the easier route. And if you are trying to impress an adcom - easier is never the right answer
 
OP
Alma1989

Alma1989

5+ Year Member
Feb 12, 2013
103
145
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
So essentially, no, you do not have a good reason.

Step 1 - get one


I don't know what to tell you. Community colleges arent held in the same regard as 4 year schools. Yes, they are acceptable, but its perceived (rightly or not is irrelevant) as taking the easier route. And if you are trying to impress an adcom - easier is never the right answer
Noted. Thank you.
 
OP
Alma1989

Alma1989

5+ Year Member
Feb 12, 2013
103
145
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
A lot of Post-Baccs are labeled as "career changer" programs, designed for people with little to no academic experience in the science pre-reqs for med school. Given just that, I don't think not having taken any of those courses undergrad should deter you from applying.

A few caveats though... For most programs it's always better to apply on the earlier side of the application cycle and it's pretty late into this year's cycle (assuming you wanted to apply to start this summer/fall). Also, while you're not expected to have much academic experience or even much of a medical background, you need to be able to sufficiently defend your choice to pursue medicine (whether it be in your personal statement, EC, interviews etc.) If you had your heart set on a formal program, it may not be a horrible idea to spend the rest of the year getting some shadowing and additional volunteer work done and then apply next year.

Hope that helps, best of luck to you.
That helped in a thousand, different ways. Thank you. I shall go out and get some real experience.
 
OP
Alma1989

Alma1989

5+ Year Member
Feb 12, 2013
103
145
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Sorry to dredge up a post this old, but with the end of my premed path this week, I felt like revisiting this thread. So here's my UPDATE: I see now I totally was just asking in this thread a basic question: "I don't have science prereqs. What should I do?" and I worded it quite poorly and got as you see above, the answers above.

Long story short, 3.9ish GPA and 511 MCAT with multiple, lovely long-lasting memories after doing all my science prereqs at my home state university. Already accepted at D.O., hopefully a few other MDs will come in.

Advice for others: I know this sounds terribly ironic, but don't come to SDN for initial advice. Go find a (good) advisor at a REAL university and have him pump you full of knowledge about this whole process. Find other people who have gone through the premed/med school app process. Coming here and getting rudeness thrown at you by people who don't know your situation will do you no good. Believe in yourself, work hard, figure out how medicine fits in your life, and you will prosper.

Alma, over and out.