1. This forum is for support and discussion only. Please promote test prep materials/services (including AMAs) in the Special Offers subforum only. Thanks!
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, be sure to check out How To Get Into Dental School, our free downloadable PDF with step-by-step details for dental school applicants!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Last chance to give your feedback! Fill out the 2019 SDN Member Survey to let us know what's important to you (and win prizes!)

Nomenclature, what is (n)

Discussion in 'DAT Discussions' started by bluesdeluxe, Jul 24, 2006.

  1. bluesdeluxe

    bluesdeluxe Member
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2006
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    0
    n-propyl chloride

    what does the n stand for? I thought n was for nitrogen containing compounds and the above doesn't have but 3 carbons and a halide. Is this not 1-chloropropane? This is probably some easy rule I forgot but I see that N and think something altogether different
     
  2. fancymylotus

    fancymylotus A Whole New World
    Dentist 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2004
    Messages:
    36,046
    Likes Received:
    17,663
    n=normal

    so c-c-c-OH = n-propyl alcohol, or 1-propanol.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  3. djeffreyt

    djeffreyt Senior Member
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2006
    Messages:
    1,769
    Likes Received:
    9
    Status:
    Dentist
    yeah, n=normal. so that basically means an unbranched straight chain of carbons, as opposed to t-butyl or neopentyl
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...

Share This Page