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md_hopeful21

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Do you guys know what kind of jobs I can get if I decide NOT to goto residency, I'm a US allopathic medschool student. Thanks.
 

OncoCaP

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Do you guys know what kind of jobs I can get if I decide NOT to goto residency, I'm a US allopathic medschool student. Thanks.

Academic research, industry research. Drug company sales. You could start your own company that develops and sells stuff to physicians and hospitals (software such EHR). Maybe go to law school and specialize in medical or patent law. Get a MPH and go into public health.
 
W

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I'd at least do a prelim year and pass the step 3. Might as well finish what you started.

Best bet is drug companies or research.

:idea: Have you seen those commercials with the doctor promoting the metabolism booster? j/k
 
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Tired

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why would a prelim year be helpful?

I was just kidding. I'm only an MSIV, so I'll just pass on what others have said. You might want to search the forums here, because I know others have dealt with this topic much better than me.

1) Most states require at least a one-year internship to be licensed, if this is important to you.

2) You can theoretically work as a GP once licensed, but will find it extremely difficult to get priveleges at a hospital, so probably forget about any inpatient/procedure work.

3) Academics/consulting are theoretical options, but opinions seem to vary as to the availability and salary of such positions.

In my own limited experience, I have met one person who went this route, and she went from med school to teaching anatomy to med students. I guess the real question is, why would you not want to do a residency?
 

Taurus

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Become a movie star.

One of the guys who produces lonelygrl15 on youtube is a former surgery resident who apparently dropped out.
 

md_hopeful21

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i'd rather say "want more fries with that" than backstab my colleague physicians; its sad how there's a bunch of vultures waiting for you to make a mistake

but yeah i appreciate all the ideas people are presenting, so someone mentioned research... who hires a person with just an MD and no research experience? or how do i go about getting hired like that?
 

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I'm just a lowly pre-med, and honestly I know I have no business posting in this thread. I am just curious why the OP does not want to go through their residency.
 
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Law2Doc

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I was just kidding. I'm only an MSIV, so I'll just pass on what others have said. You might want to search the forums here, because I know others have dealt with this topic much better than me.

1) Most states require at least a one-year internship to be licensed, if this is important to you.

2) You can theoretically work as a GP once licensed, but will find it extremely difficult to get priveleges at a hospital, so probably forget about any inpatient/procedure work.


I've also heard this, and it has also been suggested by older docs that if you have done that first year, you keep the door open for future residencies should you change your mind and want to go back to medicine. Not sure why, but apparently it makes a difference.
 

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LOL

why would a prelim year be helpful?


Because then you are a fully licensed physician. Even if you have no intention of practicing, I have been told that this gives you a lot more "street cred" i.e. people will have some respect for what you're saying, teaching, publishing, etc. Apparently, this also makes you much more likely to land jobs in pharma, biotech, etc. etc.

Personally, I would do a prelim year and get licensed while searching for and weighing options. Who knows, maybe a residency will be more appealing a year from now and doing a prelim year keeps that option open.
 

helpfuldoc2b

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I bet that guy is welcomed with open arms at his med school class reunions. :D

Why does everyone consider an MD getting a JD as selling out. I mean you can always use your JD in other ways such as being a defense attorney for physicians involved in frivolous lawsuits, you can use it for medical consulting (eventhough you can probably do this without a JD, but a JD may enhance your opportunities), work in major pharmaceutical companies, you can do Patent and IP law, Medical Administration (President of Med School, CEO of Hospital), High level Health Care Policy Position/Lobbiest, etc... I am no expert in careers, but wanted to list a few things off the top of my head that will hopefully encourage some positive advice to the OP.
 

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I would do a prelim year as well just to supplement the MD with some actual clinical experience and add credence to your knowledge base in whatever it is you do. A very interesting, and lucrative option, is to go get a job on wall street as a consultant to investment houses and other financial firms. These guys pour millions into investing in pharmaceutical companies, medical supplies, providers, etc etc and highly value the knowledge base which only an MD can provide. I've heard of people doing this, although it might help to have an MBA or some finanice eperience as an UG.

Did anyone else get creeped out by that picture of the MD/JD? That guy looks like a total sheister.
 

Law2Doc

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Why does everyone consider an MD getting a JD as selling out. I mean you can always use your JD in other ways such as being a defense attorney for physicians involved in frivolous lawsuits, you can use it for medical consulting (eventhough you can probably do this without a JD, but a JD may enhance your opportunities), work in major pharmaceutical companies, you can do Patent and IP law, Medical Administration (President of Med School, CEO of Hospital), High level Health Care Policy Position/Lobbiest, etc... I am no expert in careers, but wanted to list a few things off the top of my head that will hopefully encourage some positive advice to the OP.

Speaking as someone who will ultimately have both those degrees but coming the other direction, I would suggest that there are actually very limited "good" ways to combine these two degrees. Academics and health policy are the two that come to mind.

FWIW, there isn't a necessity to have an MD to do medmal plaintiff or defense work and it isn't going to be much of an advantage. 99.99% of those who do this work are not MDs and MDs are not being actively recruited for this position. To go this route basically means you are not using your MD. Similarly in patent law, the desired degree is currently a PhD. So I see it as the opposite of selling out if you plan to go to law -- you spent 4 years doing a diversion which probably cost you dearly in employment years.

Pharmaceutical companies have a greater demand for MD/MBAs than JDs, but you can probably make a JD work for you if you first get some corporate law experience are the right personality. A JD without work experience is not always given much credence by industry, due to the glut of lawyers out there without experience available for virtually any job. You see far more movement from law firms to industry than from law schools to industry regardless of the credentials. As for policy positions and academics, they tend to be lower pay than that of a physician so I doubt this counts as "selling out". Again you will be far more use in policy if you actually worked as a lawyer first though.
 
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I'm just a lowly pre-med, and honestly I know I have no business posting in this thread. I am just curious why the OP does not want to go through their residency.


About two weeks into your intern year you're going to slap yourself on the forhead and say, "Oh, that's why he didn't want to do a residency!"

Trust me.

See Brother Stox's blog, Medschoolhell, the link to which can be found on my blog.
 

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i'd rather say "want more fries with that" than backstab my colleague physicians; its sad how there's a bunch of vultures waiting for you to make a mistake

We'll see what you say the first time you see a patient with a truly incompetant doctor. And believe me, there are a lot out there.
 

md_hopeful21

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We'll see what you say the first time you see a patient with a truly incompetant doctor. And believe me, there are a lot out there.

yeah i've seen them but trust me there's a BLEEP more of those a.hole patients and crappy lawyers wanting to more money sueing good doctors and wasting their time
 
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