Apr 1, 2010
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Medical Student
Hey all- am just trying to figure out my schedule for next year, and wanted to get some advice on the NY programs. I am pretty sure that's where I want to end up, but don't know a lot about all of the different programs there. I know NYU and Columbia are "wicked competitive," but don't really have a good sense what that exactly means... i.e. what does it take to match at one of those programs (I was looking at the match lists from the last several years and can't really see any particular pattern). Also, would love to hear any input re: the strengths/weaknesses of these programs, and whether I should consider doing an away out there. Thanks for all the help!
 

ChocolateKiss

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Jan 2, 2006
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If you're okay with Brooklyn, SUNY Downstate is less competitive than NYU, Columbia, and Cornell, and I know they have a fair number of away rotaters.

My thoughts on NYU and Columbia are below.

NYU

GOOD: great reputation as one of the best programs in existence, big program, lots of cool specialty clinics (genodermatoses, leprosy, tropical diseases), great peds derm, path, surgery, great diversity of patients, subsidized housing for residents

BAD:some of the faculty are notoriously difficult to work with, very busy -->long hours, few electives

COLUMBIA

GOOD: great clinical training, most of the faculty are nice

BAD: lots of consult months with long hours and not-so-nice consult attending
 

ChocolateKiss

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A consult month is when you're the resident responsible for seeing all of the dermatology consults called by the teams caring for patients in the hospital. If you are at a big program like Columbia, there are typically lots of consults, and you are very busy.

When a consult is called, you evaluate the patient, do any necessary diagnostic procedures (ie biopsy) and make recommendations to the primary team. Throughout the patient's hospital stay, you continue to see that patient (frequency depends on the dermatologic issue, ranging from multiple times per day to once a weekish), write notes, and make recommendations to the primary team.

The consult attending is the derm attending to whom you present all of the consult patients. At Columbia, there is one attending who does virtually all of the consults.