Obtaining Letters of Recommendations

Discussion in 'Pre-Veterinary' started by ethereal_goldfish, 05.18.14.

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  1. ethereal_goldfish

    ethereal_goldfish

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    Hello everyone!

    I am currently a pre-vet student and would really like advice from current students/veterinarians/etc. about how to obtain letters of recommendations. Specifically, about asking professors. Is it a bad idea to ask a professor for a LoR if you have never done any research for them (ie. they don't know you very well), even though you took two of their classes and did well in them? Also, I don't know why, but I just find asking a veterinarian or anyone else for a LoR to be very intimidating! Any advice would help! Maybe include examples of how you obtained your LoR and from who? I am thinking of applying for veterinary schools this coming cycle, but I am having a hard time with the LoR and PPI evaluations. I just don't feel like I know my professors well enough. I have a veterinarian in mind I can ask already, and my supervisor for my lab internship. However, that is only two people, when I need three. If I can not obtain a third LoR, I will most likely have to take a year off and apply next year.
     
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  3. Gwenevre

    Gwenevre 2+ Year Member

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    First, I think it's good that you're looking for variety in your LORs.
    Second, I have always been told to get LORs from people who know you well.

    On those notes, asking for LORs is a bit scary, but it doesn't have to be intimidating. Especially vets, they know what you are going through applying for vet schools, so I would just ask them in person if they feel comfortable writing you an LOR for this coming year.

    In addition, something that can help you get good LORs from people who don't know you that well, offer them a copy of your resumé or CV (curriculum vitae) that they can work off of, if they do agree to write you one. Or when your asking, ask them to highlight key things about you (example, I asked a professor of mine to write me a recommendation for camp, and I asked him to highlight my leadership experiences in one of his classes).
     
  4. equineconstant

    equineconstant Purple & Gold 2017 2+ Year Member

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    Why do you think research is a prerequisite for a relationship with a professor? I never did research with any professor, but I still had a few professors I was comfortable asking for recommendations. One was the same scenario you outlined here: I'd taken two of her classes and done well. One of the classes also had a lab component, so I do think that helped.

    I second Gwen's advice about offering a resume and/or asking your writers to highlight something in particular about you. When I asked for letters from professors, I gave them a printout of my resume as well as a cover letter with bullet points that aren't necessarily on my resume but might be relevant. When you're asking whether they're willing, make sure you ask if they feel comfortable writing you a positive or excellent recommendation. It's simple enough to ask in person, and then you can email them your resume if they want it. Some people might want to sit down and talk with you before they write their letter, to ask about what you want them to highlight, what sides of you your other recommendations cover, if you remember any specific times you highlighted X quality, etc. It might be a little intimidating, but it's not so bad, and worth it when you have a positive letter that really shows why you should be accepted!
     
  5. that redhead

    that redhead 5+ Year Member

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    I had two from vets I'd worked with and one from a professor I'd had in a class and then TA'ed for. I just asked them in person ("So would you be willing/have time to write me a letter of rec for vet school?") and they said yes.

    It isn't necessarily a bad idea to ask a professor you've had for class only but it would be much better to ask someone you've worked with outside of just a classroom setting, at least in my opinion. That being said, if the choice is to ask that professor or wait a year to apply, I would definitely ask that professor :)
     
  6. WhtsThFrequency

    WhtsThFrequency walk like a monkey, kick like a mule 10+ Year Member

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    Agreed, I think it is perfectly all right to ask as long as you provide them with background via resume, etc. and perhaps also offer to sit down and meet with them for a little bit so they can talk to you/get to know you better one on one.

    I don't know if I would ask in person though - that puts people on the spot.
     
  7. that redhead

    that redhead 5+ Year Member

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    That's a really good point. I was close enough to my letter writers that I...felt confident that they would say yes :shy: Emailing to ask is always the safer option (and you can easily include your resume/etc attached to the email.)
     
  8. Gwenevre

    Gwenevre 2+ Year Member

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    See, I've always hesitated to ask for a recommendation over e-mail unless I know them (i.e., my work supervisor with whom I've worked for three years). I think it makes a more professional statement if you ask them in person. If they don't feel comfortable writing one, they'll straight up tell you. Plus, e-mails can get lost in confusion, especially if your recommendor is a very busy person. Or if you e-mail, follow up in person no less than a week later.
     
  9. LetItSnow

    LetItSnow Skipping the light fandango 5+ Year Member

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    I would agree. I would not ask for a rec via email unless there's a very obvious (to them!!!!) reason you have to do so. Like, maybe they're on extended sabbatical. Or you've since moved home halfway across the country.

    .... and even then, I'd at least do it via a phone call.

    If anyone emailed me asking for a rec, I'd decline to help them unless there was a very good reason they couldn't take the time to be professional in asking.
     
  10. ethereal_goldfish

    ethereal_goldfish

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    Okay, thanks everyone for the advice! I was just a bit worried because I have a professor in mind to ask, but the last class I took with him was last summer, therefore, I am positive he has no clue who I am. However, should I contact him to set up a meeting, or should I just email him asking if he can consider writing me a letter of rec and give him the option to meet in person if he chooses to? I don't think he is teaching any classes this quarter, and I am not expecting him to be in his office every day.
     
  11. Gwenevre

    Gwenevre 2+ Year Member

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    If it was a summer class, which I'm under the assumption would be a smaller class size, then there may be a good chance he remembers you. Set up a meeting with him (via his secretary if he has one or e-mail) so you can visually remind him who you are, and bring your resumé along.
     
  12. catnips

    catnips 2+ Year Member

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    I will be away for most of the summer in which I have to ask for rec letters... Do you guys think its okay to email then?

    I was going to go ask face to face before I go back to my country, but the grades won't be up yet, and I am not sure if I should ask for rec letters before actually seeing the grade I will get? :nailbiting: I am terrified to ask eLors. The vets have already written their eLors and just waiting for application to open up but its the professors I still have to ask.
     
  13. WillowLeaf

    WillowLeaf 2+ Year Member

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    It doesn't hurt to ask, and I'm sure the professor would tell you if they didn't feel like they knew you well enough. If two or three of your LORs came from professors you didn't know that well, I could see that being a problem, but one seems fine. They could focus on your academic strengths, which a vet probably wouldn't know as well.

    I asked two vets and my advisor in person. I probably should have asked my professor in person too, but I was really nervous he would say no and emailed instead.:oops: He still said yes, though.

    If you do email, I'd make sure it sounds very professional, and I would set it up more like a professional letter than a regular email.
     
  14. WhtsThFrequency

    WhtsThFrequency walk like a monkey, kick like a mule 10+ Year Member

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    Also very valid opinions. I was just trying to put myself in the recommender's shoes. I would hate being put on the spot like that.
     
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  15. DVMDream

    DVMDream Don't disturb the snowflakes 7+ Year Member

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    I asked for a letter of recommendation from a professor via an email. I had since moved back home and I was 2 hours away from the school, also I did not have a phone number for her. So, I really didn't have an option. I think a well-written, professional email can work just fine. Just be sure to be professional, use proper grammar, spelling, punctuation, etc. The professor I asked had no problems with it, she did ask for a current resume/CV so that she could see what I had been doing since I graduated. Personally, I wouldn't deny someone a recommendation letter just because they chose to use an email instead of asking in person. Email can be a profession and simple way of communication if done properly. Also, it is good practice to learn good emailing habits as quite a few of the places I have looked at for veterinary externship/preceptorships only give an email address for contact purposes.
     
  16. ethereal_goldfish

    ethereal_goldfish

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    Thank you everyone! Ya'll have been very helpful and I really appreciate the opinions/advice! :)
     
  17. LetItSnow

    LetItSnow Skipping the light fandango 5+ Year Member

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    Yeah, that's fair.

    In my previous life I was regularly asked for recommendations from engineers trying to progress up their career path in our company. I always appreciated the ones who would come to me with a prepared plan: they would show up and say "I'd like your recommendation for the promotions committee. Here's my goal. Here's why I think I deserve it. Here's the evidence. You oversaw projects X, Y, and Z that I was instrumental in, so you can attest to my capabilities."

    Those were the ones for whom I wrote strong recommendations. The ones who just emailed me and said "Hey dude, I need three reviews so I can get my senior engineer promotion. Do you think you could do one?" ..... meh. Either I didn't give them one or I gave them one that matched the intensity/preparedness that they put in coming to me.

    I'd think that the same may hold true in very general terms for vet school. People will partner with you more eagerly if it's clear you're trying hard and being really professional.
     
  18. LetItSnow

    LetItSnow Skipping the light fandango 5+ Year Member

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    Anything CAN work fine, and if you don't have an option then of course you use email. But in general, I think your odds are best, in order, by doing it in person, then doing it by phone, and then doing it by email.....
     
  19. WhtsThFrequency

    WhtsThFrequency walk like a monkey, kick like a mule 10+ Year Member

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    Ah see, though.....you're focusing on the presentation and preparedness (and maturity), not just the mode of communication. A person could just as easily ask you in person and be lazy and unprepared, versus someone could write a very professional, thoughtful email with attached resume, plans, etc.
     
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  20. catnips

    catnips 2+ Year Member

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    Should we be writing out our plans, attaching resumes on the first email we are asking the person to write a recommendation though? I feel like that doesn't give the person the option to say "no". My plan was to first email and ask them (in a professional manner but without many details) and then if they say yes, attach a resume, and talk about my plans etc. Now I feel like that makes me sound like a person who wasn't prepared (like LetItSnow mentioned) though...
     
  21. DVMDream

    DVMDream Don't disturb the snowflakes 7+ Year Member

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    Exactly what WTF said.

    Email does not automatically make anything less professional, if you do it properly. Obviously if you have the ability to ask in person, then that would be best, but that is not always possible, especially when talking about vet school applications. That becomes even further unlikely in the future when looking for externships/preceptors/jobs/etc within the veterinary field. Times are changing with new technology and email is quickly becoming a main form of communication and networking. It is important to develop good and proper email skills now, because chances are that a lot of your future communication will be via email or via the computer in some way, shape or form. Veterinary clinics are starting to send emails now instead of snail mail reminders, some clinics are even starting to send text messages to update their clients. Technology is changing the way in which we communicate and I think it is important that we recognize that an email does not necessarily equal less professional. Also, how are you to determine if the person emailing you for a recommendation is really capable or not of asking in person? There is no way to know if that person has moved, is out of town for the next 5 months or has some other reason for not being able to come to you in person and most people will not start off an email explaining why they did not ask in person, so assuming they are just being lazy is unfair to them and not giving them full consideration.
     
  22. WhtsThFrequency

    WhtsThFrequency walk like a monkey, kick like a mule 10+ Year Member

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    I would absolutely say in the email that you want to meet in person to discuss plans, resume, etc. You can give a brief outline of things and then go on to say how you would like to sit down and discuss it more if they would be willing to write one.

    LIS, I just realized I may not have been totally clear - I COMPLETELY agree that email should not be the only form if others are available! You need to meet in person if at all possible. Email should be used as an "ice-breaker" to set up the in-person meeting. That's what I was getting at. Lots of people hate being ambushed in their offices when people need things from them and would prefer a little bit of notice so they can think it over.
     
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  23. DVMDream

    DVMDream Don't disturb the snowflakes 7+ Year Member

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    I used email completely to get a LOR from a professor all 3 years I applied. I also used a mix of FB/email/phone to get LOR's recently from a few vets. (Ok, I know these vets quite well and have good relationships with them and FB was/is my only form of communication with them).

    Then I also used email only to set up the externship that I did over Easter Break, then I further used email to follow up on my evaluation that the vet needed to complete since it was due by a specific time.

    Maybe I am just used to using email/online forms of communication due to being out of the country, but it is a very effective form of communication and it does work well for professional communication too.

    Obviously, if I could have talked to any of these people in person, then I would have but I could not. Also, I prefer email over phone calls for a few reasons:

    1. I am very good at being a part of extended phone tag games, sometimes lasting for weeks.
    2. I don't get a return phone call.
    3. There is no voice mail set up and I have to keep calling back.
    4. The receptionist or whoever doesn't get the message to the appropriate person.

    With email, I can usually get the exact email address of who I need to speak with right from the start. I usually get a reply with email. Perhaps it is because people have mad checking email a part of their usual day and find it easier to respond to an email than to return a phone call? I don't know, I just have better luck with email when trying to get in touch with people.

    I may also just like email better because of being out of the country and while I can make phone calls there are a few hoops that I have to jump through first and email is just much simpler. I also don't have a return phone number that someone in the US can call me, unless they don't mind making international phone calls. So, if I call someone and have to leave a message, I have no way for them to return my phone call. So maybe I am just a little biased due to being out of the country and relying so much on email communication.


    ETA: I do NOT at ALL encourage the use of Facebook for professional communications. The only reason I used facebook was because I am friends with these vets and I know them personally. I most definitely do not think facebook is an appropriate means of communicating or asking for a LOR under most circumstances.
     
  24. WhtsThFrequency

    WhtsThFrequency walk like a monkey, kick like a mule 10+ Year Member

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    I think both ways have their advantages. Face to face contact is obviously the best, but I agree with DVMD that email, when used in a professional manner, can suffice if you have no other way. I think both have their place and, if you have all available, their correct order.

    It may just be my introverted personality that I would find it kind of rude if someone just ambushed me in the halls and wanted a letter (unless I knew them VERY well beforehand). If you have to ask yourself "I don't know if they would write one/I wonder if they know me well enough" I believe an email is the most polite way to break the ice followed by meeting up.

    Of course, there are even exceptions to that. Some older profs/vets don't use email much or use it only for business purposes. In that case you might go right to a face to face convo.
     
  25. ethereal_goldfish

    ethereal_goldfish

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    @WhtsThFrequency I haven't thought about that yet. I think email is a better option for me, only because I do not know him very well. Plus, I just checked and he is not teaching classes this quarter, therefore, he may not even be on campus that often (so meeting him in person without a heads up to him seems unlikely).
     
  26. LetItSnow

    LetItSnow Skipping the light fandango 5+ Year Member

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    No, not really. I'm focused on all of the above, including the mode of communication.

    And respectfully, DVMD, I still believe that email is generally perceived in the business world to be less professional. If you want a favor of someone, almost everyone perceives face-to-face requests as professional, whereas some subset of those perceive email as appropriate. Obviously you disagree, but... *shrug*
     
  27. LetItSnow

    LetItSnow Skipping the light fandango 5+ Year Member

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    That's another reason I wouldn't do it via email. If you go to them with everything, you don't have to throw it down on their desk. You just say "bla hblah blah would really appreciate your support with a strongly favorable recommendation."

    If they're enthusiastic, you're right there to offer them materials if they want it. And if they don't want it, no big deal. I've had some people I don't need anything from them because I'm so familiar with their work I could write it on the spot. With some others I know them enough to be strongly supportive, but don't necessarily have all the details, and I've appreciated them providing it to me without a lot of time-wasting back and forth.
     
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  28. LetItSnow

    LetItSnow Skipping the light fandango 5+ Year Member

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    Eh. You're framing the conversation such that of course that's negative. Nobody wants to be "ambushed," WTF.

    I'm not encouraging people to stalk anyone outside their office, waiting for them to come out for a pee break, so that you can trail them to the urinal.

    C'mon. That's not what I'm saying, and you're well aware of that. Meeting someone in person does not equate to "ambushing" them.
     
  29. LetItSnow

    LetItSnow Skipping the light fandango 5+ Year Member

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    If he's not around, then of course you should email him.

    But, the less you know someone, the more I'd lean toward face-to-face in general! Put yourself in his shoes ... you get some random email from someone you only barely remember, asking for a really strong letter of recommendation.... as opposed to someone setting up a time to meet with you in your office, so that you have a chance to remember them before they're there, and then you have their face in front of you to spark recognition.
     
  30. WhtsThFrequency

    WhtsThFrequency walk like a monkey, kick like a mule 10+ Year Member

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    I guess what I was trying to convey is that, what if someone asked me to write them a letter and it was a person I was unsure about/did not know well and would prefer to think onit. But when they are right there in front of you, and you don't have time to think, it is very easy to get pushed into saying yes because you are simply unaware. And now you're stuck writing a letter that you don't really want to write and it'll be a crap letter.

    Now, maybe I am framing this with my own social awkwardness ;) but such personalities are not uncommon especially in academia.
     
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  31. WhtsThFrequency

    WhtsThFrequency walk like a monkey, kick like a mule 10+ Year Member

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    I'm saying the email should be the thing that sets up the meeting (which I agree is essential). Like a phone call to ask to come interview for a job.
     
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  32. WhtsThFrequency

    WhtsThFrequency walk like a monkey, kick like a mule 10+ Year Member

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    I have the answer. Obviously the OP needs to do a signing telegram in a Chiquita banana costume.
     
  33. WhtsThFrequency

    WhtsThFrequency walk like a monkey, kick like a mule 10+ Year Member

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    But she should email first in case he prefers strawberries so he doesn't get ambushed by a banana.
     
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  34. Minnerbelle

    Minnerbelle Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

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    I kinda feel like if it requires your face in person for someone to remember you... That person isn't the best candidate to write you a strong letter.

    Personally never had issues just emailing ahead to let people know I was finally in the application process, and setting up a time to chat about it. For people I knew would write me excellent letters and weren't in the area, email was the primary mode of communication and I don't think they saw me as less passionate or wanting it any less because of it. They knew me well enough that communication didn't have to be super professional.
     
  35. DVMDream

    DVMDream Don't disturb the snowflakes 7+ Year Member

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    I think we agree more than you realize. I definitely think that if you have the ability to meet face to face that is the best, however I think we are viewing this from two different perspectives. You are thinking about the recommendations that you wrote for people who worked for the same company for you and were looking to climb up the corporate ladder. Chances are that these people worked in the same building, town and office that you did. It is a bit awkward to have someone that is within the same building send you an email for a letter of recommendation when they could just come to you and ask. Also, chances are good that you have worked with these people in some way, shape or form and know a bit about their work ethic.

    A pre-vet student asking a professor that they have never worked with is a completely different scenario. Sure, they could try to catch the professor during office hours, but that puts the professor on the spot. Also, most pre-vets looking for LORs are in their early 20's and many of them aren't really settled in one area. I know that a lot of undergrads head back "home" during summer break (which is when VMCAS is open) and aren't even near their university. Sure they could ask before the application opens in June, but you also don't want to ask too early and you don't want to ask too late. So they are having to ask during the summer vacation. Also, pre-vets are gaining experiences from multiple places/sources usually. So, depending upon where you are during that summer you are applying could determine who you are able to have face to face contact with. Sure, you could try calling people but it is much more difficult to catch someone with a phone call than just sending an email. Also, with the email, you can go ahead and attach resume/CV as if you were meeting in person.

    Also, we have to remember that asking for a LOR is nerve-wracking and can be a bit awkward. You are asking someone for a big favor and depending upon your personality, it can be a difficult thing to do. It is made even more difficult if you do not know the person very well, such as a professor you have never worked with before. Also, as Minnerbelle stated, if you are having to show up face to face with someone so that they can remember you, then they are probably not the best for giving a LOR.

    I think we just have a difference in order of doing things. We both agree in person is best, but I think email can be a good starter (if needed) and I do think email is better than a phone call. Just my opinion, which might be biased due to having to communicate a lot internationally.
     
  36. ethereal_goldfish

    ethereal_goldfish

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    I think since I took this professor's class last summer and when I was a sophomore, I'll email him with an introduction type thing, "I took your class...." I can explain why I would like him to write me a recommendation and then ask if he would be willing to right me a recommendation. If he says yes, then I'll offer to meet him in person, send him my resume, etc. If he says no, then I'll thank him for taking the time. I guess that would be the worst case scenario, that he will say no and move on. I honestly think it will be kind of awkward for the both of us if I just show up at his office unannounced and ask him for a LoR.
     
  37. ethereal_goldfish

    ethereal_goldfish

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    Location:
    CA
    Status:
    Pre-Veterinary
    Also, I have another question. Say I do not get in or decline schools for this cycle and then apply next year. Would I have to ask for LoRs again? Or because I have already created an account, I can still use the same LoRs because they are "on file". Obviously, this is taking into consideration that I don't do anything new for a whole year in between cycles, but this is all hypothetical, I am just wondering how that would work.
     
  38. WillowLeaf

    WillowLeaf 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    09.10.13
    Messages:
    2,053
    Status:
    Veterinary Student
    If VMCAS doesn't save the info (no idea if they do), you could also ask your LOR writers if they could save a copy on their computer. I think some of my LOR writers mentioned doing this in case I needed to reapply, so they could just copy/paste and quickly update it if anything changed in that year. It might be a good idea to ask that even if VMCAS saves it, in case you end up applying to a non-VMCAS-using school the next year, or VMCAS for some reason loses your letters.
     
  39. Gwenevre

    Gwenevre 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    02.17.14
    Messages:
    4,330
    Location:
    West 'Fayette
    Status:
    Non-Student
    I believe this coming year, VMCAS is saving information, but I'm not counting on them saving my last years LORs.
     
  40. Gwenevre

    Gwenevre 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    02.17.14
    Messages:
    4,330
    Location:
    West 'Fayette
    Status:
    Non-Student
  41. DVMDream

    DVMDream Don't disturb the snowflakes 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    07.15.09
    Messages:
    32,763
    Location:
    The Dragon School
    Status:
    Veterinary Student
    Verified
    Veterinarian
    You will most definitely have to ask for LOR each year that you apply, VMCAS does not save this information.
     
  42. StartingoverVet

    StartingoverVet Flight Instructor for hire Lifetime Donor 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    02.17.10
    Messages:
    22,677
    Location:
    Neither here nor there.
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Well... I just went through this sort of (believe it or not... see syzygy's post earlier he he)..

    I just e-mailed a professor from 4 years ago that I had minimal (i.e. none) contact with since. There was a reason he was particularly appropriate to write me a LOR, which I stated politely in an e-mail. I think an e-mail, reminding the prof of your circumstances, performance, and something that he may specifically remember about you is fine.

    FWIW, I think using the phone is also a dying art. Really OT, but in my old field, everyone communicated on-line (not necessarily e-mail but the same effect), but if you REALLY wanted something to get done, or to have a favor, you picked up the phone... and you ALWAYS got a better response. It is just a lot harder to ignore that voice in your ear than those words on a screen. Just saying for future reference.

    ps- DON'T call from your cell phone when it is important. Nothing more annoying than a lousy cell connection. For everydy stuff no problem, but if you want a favor or something, use a freaking land line.
     
  43. DVMDream

    DVMDream Don't disturb the snowflakes 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    07.15.09
    Messages:
    32,763
    Location:
    The Dragon School
    Status:
    Veterinary Student
    Verified
    Veterinarian
    :laugh: A land line... hahaha. Those are becoming just as rare as people using pay phones.... I have a feeling land line phones will eventually be a thing of the distant past (at least in the home, will probably still be around for some time in businesses).

    Watch this for a good laugh:

     
  44. Minnerbelle

    Minnerbelle Moderator Emeritus 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    04.02.09
    Messages:
    4,992
    Status:
    Veterinary Student
    No the worst case scenario is that he says yes and writes you a super generic Luke warm LOR. Make sure you ask if he can write you a STRONG letter.
     
    dalmatiandoc17 and Gwenevre like this.
  45. LetItSnow

    LetItSnow Skipping the light fandango 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    01.13.11
    Messages:
    14,979
    Location:
    Plymouth, MN, USA
    Status:
    Veterinarian
    Verified
    Veterinarian
    Please don't ask him if he's willing "to right [you] a recommendation." Just sayin'.
     
  46. ethereal_goldfish

    ethereal_goldfish

    Joined:
    04.24.14
    Messages:
    29
    Location:
    CA
    Status:
    Pre-Veterinary
    :\ okay. I guess it is a lot more risks and things to consider than I thought.
     
  47. WhtsThFrequency

    WhtsThFrequency walk like a monkey, kick like a mule 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    01.18.06
    Messages:
    15,034
    Status:
    Fellow [Any Field]
    Verified
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    :bored: I think you missed the joke ;)
     
    LetItSnow likes this.
  48. Gwenevre

    Gwenevre 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    02.17.14
    Messages:
    4,330
    Location:
    West 'Fayette
    Status:
    Non-Student
    So bumping this thread for a similar question. What's the appropriate way to ask a past professor to be a work/academic reference? This specific prof in my case is my repro prof, as I am applying to various breeding internships/positions.
     
  49. LetItSnow

    LetItSnow Skipping the light fandango 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    01.13.11
    Messages:
    14,979
    Location:
    Plymouth, MN, USA
    Status:
    Veterinarian
    Verified
    Veterinarian
    Judging by our past comments, if WTF or DVMD are the profs, you should email them. If I'm the prof, you should come talk to me. :)
     
    WildZoo, Gwenevre and Minnerbelle like this.
  50. hbr1704

    hbr1704 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    12.24.13
    Messages:
    105
    Status:
    Veterinary Student

    Late to the ball game, but not too late I hope. :D

    Anyways, how long ago did you have this professor and did you interact with this professor outside of the classroom? I asked a past professor to write me a letter of recommendation to get into vet school (three years after I had him). I thought we had this great relationship, I mean he knew my name and I would often go to his office to chat about the class and plans post undergrad. I did the application review and came to find out that it was a terrible letter. It was definitely evident that he wrote me a generic letter that really had nothing outstanding to add to my application and that he did not remember me.

    *side note* I thought I needed a letter from a professor because it was just the thing to have. Also, after that experience I will never ask a professor for a letter of recommendation unless I have worked for him.
     
  51. Gwenevre

    Gwenevre 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    02.17.14
    Messages:
    4,330
    Location:
    West 'Fayette
    Status:
    Non-Student
    I was in her class last fall, aced the class and labs, and have spoken with her once or twice since I graduated in December. :)
     

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