Jul 31, 2019
43
42
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Looking for opinions on chances for next cycle:

AMG MD. US citizen. Upcoming chief year at mid-tier university institution in South.
Multiple other leadership roles and residency awards.
Step 1: 230s, Step 2: 230s and pass, Step 3: 220s
15 pubs (5 as first author) ranging from case reports to meta-analyses. Only 3 of those are non-GI.
3 DDW posters. 10 ACG posters. 2 ACP/SGIM posters. 2 posters at other conferences.
GIE blog post.
Planning to get LORs from two well-known GI's and another not as well known. Total 4 LORs including PD.
apply broadly. At least 40 programs with varying levels of prestige
 
  • Like
Reactions: SeldingerTechneek

GastriqueGraffin

2+ Year Member
Jul 20, 2017
384
353
Looking for opinions on chances for next cycle:

AMG MD. US citizen. Upcoming chief year at mid-tier university institution in South.
Multiple other leadership roles and residency awards.
Step 1: 230s, Step 2: 230s and pass, Step 3: 220s
15 pubs (5 as first author) ranging from case reports to meta-analyses. Only 3 of those are non-GI.
3 DDW posters. 10 ACG posters. 2 ACP/SGIM posters. 2 posters at other conferences.
GIE blog post.
Planning to get LORs from two well-known GI's and another not as well known. Total 4 LORs including PD.
If you apply somewhat broadly you have about 100% chance of matching.
 
About the Ads
OP
ShiShiMD

ShiShiMD

2+ Year Member
Jun 20, 2016
451
244
East Coast
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Looking for opinions on chances for next cycle:

AMG MD. US citizen. Upcoming chief year at mid-tier university institution in South.
Multiple other leadership roles and residency awards.
Step 1: 230s, Step 2: 230s and pass, Step 3: 220s
15 pubs (5 as first author) ranging from case reports to meta-analyses. Only 3 of those are non-GI.
3 DDW posters. 10 ACG posters. 2 ACP/SGIM posters. 2 posters at other conferences.
GIE blog post.
Planning to get LORs from two well-known GI's and another not as well known. Total 4 LORs including PD.
Be professional and show you have strong interpersonal and communication skills in your interviews and you will match. Apply to all the programs you can afford.
 
Jul 25, 2019
23
24
Status
Attending Physician
Be professional and show you have strong interpersonal and communication skills in your interviews and you will match. Apply to all the programs you can afford.
Agreed
Apply broadly. Be professional and show interest. Otherwise you have an excellent CV.

I have seen a program saying that they will not rank 2 AMG good applicants because they didn't show interest and fellows didn't like them. I am sure they matched somewhere else, the idea though is to be curious, professional, and show interest.

Good Luck!
 

cabergoline2

2+ Year Member
Nov 22, 2015
305
210
Status
Medical Student
IMG (PGY3) --Matched in my 7th choice (non-in house mid-tier university program) ,but still happy...
PGY3 Mid tier University program with reputation for being IMG friendly but in a high volume tertiary care center with access to research..mid tier in house fellowship...
270/270/250
Abstracts:Multiple orals and 15+ posters in DDW (matters the most) / ACG and AASLD..
Publications: 7 published 3 accepted 5 submitted and multiple ongoing manuscripts
Immigration status: Greencard
Application/Interview info: applied to 85 programs had 22 invites . was able to go to 17..cancelled 5 due to scheduling conflicts
My top 3 choices were high pedigree brand name programs that sparingly take imgs...my 4-6 choices were more img friendly so was surprised I did not end up there..
Thoughts
-1) It's competitive as hell..Specially for an img not from a high pedigree program...
-2)Pedigree is the bane of our existence ..
-3) Lot's of politics... Programs communicate with each other about applicants all the time.. A large part of the match is decided before the match..
-4)the above 3 points are not under your control for most part ..
-5) If you are an img work extremely hard and publish...you should look like an early career research faculty on your cv..
-6) Apply to GI only if you badly want it because of point number 5. The time I spend in the lab or writing stuff up or doing stats could have been spent in a much more fun way...
-7) have a mentor to advocate for you and be smart about where you have him call...Ideally it should be someone who knows people... this is how you navigate point number 3... Who would have thought getting x GI is like an election campaign ehh
-8) practice interviewing and make sure you are liked...sounds cliched .. but there are pitfalls.. If you are a pgy3 odds are that you were on call the day before interview and took a red eye to get there and feel like punching everyone around you due to sleep deprivation... somehow still smile and appear interested etc... given how competitive it is programs are actively looking for reasons to not rank you rather than the reverse...
-9) Regardless of what you do there will be stuff not in your control... In my top choice everyone liked me except one dude who for some reason hated me with the bottom of his heart... I came to know about this post match day that everyone else wanted me there ,but that guy had the veto power...these things will happen...
-10)As an img matching x gi (particularly outside home institute) is a big deal... No wonder most imgs x gi emerge as leaders... also a reason why img friendly gi programs have more abstracts in DDW and win the GI jeopardy year after year..
 
Last edited:
Jul 25, 2019
23
24
Status
Attending Physician
IMG (PGY3) --Matched in my 7th choice (non-in house mid-tier university program) ,but still happy...
PGY3 Mid tier University program with reputation for being IMG friendly but in a high volume tertiary care center with access to research..mid tier in house fellowship...
270/270/250
Abstracts:Multiple orals and 15+ posters in DDW (matters the most) / ACG and AASLD..
Publications: 7 published 3 accepted 5 submitted and multiple ongoing manuscripts
Immigration status: Greencard
Application/Interview info: applied to 85 programs had 22 invites . was able to go to 17..cancelled 5 due to scheduling conflicts
My top 3 choices were high pedigree brand name programs that sparingly take imgs...my 4-6 choices were more img friendly so was surprised I did not end up there..
Thoughts
-1) It's competitive as hell..Specially for an img not from a high pedigree program...
-2)Pedigree is the bane of our existence ..
-3) Lot's of politics... Programs communicate with each other about applicants all the time.. A large part of the match is decided before the match..
-4)the above 3 points are not under your control for most part ..
-5) If you are an img work extremely hard and publish...you should look like an early career research faculty on your cv..
-6) Apply to GI only if you badly want it because of point number 5. The time I spend in the lab or writing stuff up or doing stats could have been spent in a much more fun way...
-7) have a mentor to advocate for you and be smart about where you have him call...Ideally it should be someone who knows people... this is how you navigate point number 3... Who would have thought getting x GI is like an election campaign ehh
-8) practice interviewing and make sure you are liked...sounds cliched .. but there are pitfalls.. If you are a pgy3 odds are that you were on call the day before interview and took a red eye to get there and feel like punching everyone around you due to sleep deprivation... somehow still smile and appear interested etc... given how competitive it is programs are actively looking for reasons to not rank you rather than the reverse...
-9) Regardless of what you do there will be stuff not in your control... In my top choice everyone liked me except one dude who for some reason hated me with the bottom of his heart... I came to know about this post match day that everyone else wanted me there ,but that guy had the veto power...these things will happen...
-10)As an img matching x gi (particularly outside home institute) is a big deal... No wonder most imgs x gi emerge as leaders... also a reason why img friendly gi programs have more abstracts in DDW and win the GI jeopardy year after year..
Couldn't agree more!

Very competitive, particularly for IMGs. It is noticible that some applicants will have 6,7,8 sometimes more and they don't match or end up matching last choice.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bar and ShiShiMD
Dec 11, 2019
2
2
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Didn't match this year... damn.

AMG MD at top tier program, graduated from top tier medical school
Steps 250s/260s/240s
4 GI abstracts at ACG/DDW, 1 GI first author manuscript in submission, 3 pubs (2 first author) in non-GI journals
Typical residency leadership roles/involvement but no chief year
LORs strong, from regionally (but maybe not nationally) known faculty
Applied to 45, invited to 12, made it to 10 interviews and ranked all 10. Letter of interest to my #1.

Pedigree is not everything, my friends.
 

cabergoline2

2+ Year Member
Nov 22, 2015
305
210
Status
Medical Student
Didn't match this year... damn.

AMG MD at top tier program, graduated from top tier medical school
Steps 250s/260s/240s
4 GI abstracts at ACG/DDW, 1 GI first author manuscript in submission, 3 pubs (2 first author) in non-GI journals
Typical residency leadership roles/involvement but no chief year
LORs strong, from regionally (but maybe not nationally) known faculty
Applied to 45, invited to 12, made it to 10 interviews and ranked all 10. Letter of interest to my #1.

Pedigree is not everything, my friends.

I am sorry... I agree with you completely.... I know a couple of other such instances as well...Everyone is at a risk of not matching...high pedigree reduces the risk to a large extent... However what ends up happening is that if you go to high pedigree programs chances are that there will be 8-10 people applying from your class...no one invites everyone from the same program...all applicants from a high pedigree program will get 3-5 high pedigree invites and the rest will be mid tier and maybe some low tier... there are going to be some great applicants who'll slip through the crack and not match....

I feel bad for you because you have a stellar cv and did all the right things...You deserved to match.... you'll certainly get in next year....
 
  • Like
Reactions: ShiShiMD
OP
ShiShiMD

ShiShiMD

2+ Year Member
Jun 20, 2016
451
244
East Coast
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Didn't match this year... damn.

AMG MD at top tier program, graduated from top tier medical school
Steps 250s/260s/240s
4 GI abstracts at ACG/DDW, 1 GI first author manuscript in submission, 3 pubs (2 first author) in non-GI journals
Typical residency leadership roles/involvement but no chief year
LORs strong, from regionally (but maybe not nationally) known faculty
Applied to 45, invited to 12, made it to 10 interviews and ranked all 10. Letter of interest to my #1.

Pedigree is not everything, my friends.

I am sorry to hear that. I am sure if you apply next year you will match. Please apply to all the programs and try to go to all the interviews. Even if it is more than 20 go.

You have strong CV and scores, you will match, do not give up.
 
  • Like
Reactions: A_GI
Jul 25, 2019
23
24
Status
Attending Physician
I am sorry to hear that. I am sure if you apply next year you will match. Please apply to all the programs and try to go to all the interviews. Even if it is more than 20 go.

You have strong CV and scores, you will match, do not give up.
Yes, you have a strong cv. If this is your dream, try next year you will get it.
As said, apply more, go to all IVs. Publish more if able. Prepare well for interviews.

Good Luck! I am pretty sure you can match next year!
 
  • Like
Reactions: ShiShiMD

GastriqueGraffin

2+ Year Member
Jul 20, 2017
384
353
Didn't match this year... damn.

AMG MD at top tier program, graduated from top tier medical school
Steps 250s/260s/240s
4 GI abstracts at ACG/DDW, 1 GI first author manuscript in submission, 3 pubs (2 first author) in non-GI journals
Typical residency leadership roles/involvement but no chief year
LORs strong, from regionally (but maybe not nationally) known faculty
Applied to 45, invited to 12, made it to 10 interviews and ranked all 10. Letter of interest to my #1.

Pedigree is not everything, my friends.
My guess is you need some real interview practice or you have a major red flag you’re not sharing here. Agree with others that you should reapply and go to every invite.
 
Oct 28, 2019
23
31
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
My guess is you need some real interview practice or you have a major red flag you’re not sharing here. Agree with others that you should reapply and go to every invite.
Sorry this happened to you, it sucks. I don't want to knock you when your down, and it certainly and absolutely could be terrible luck or that you applied to only highly highly selective programs and just missed out, but I do hope we can provide constructive criticism which is why I want to say that I agree with GastriqueGraffin. I would really look into the things he mentioned. You clearly are a strong applicant, and looking at the Charting the Outcomes from prior years your profile has a near 100% chance of matching on scores/ research/ US grad alone. I'd have to humbly disagree, pedigree is so disproportionately valued that it may well be everything, so it is highly unusual for you not to have matched.

If I were you (and I was no top applicant but I interviewed at some top tier programs and matched at my #1), definitely be open to the possibility that you may have said something that inadvertently rubbed someone the wrong way or you may not have interviewed at the top of your caliber, maybe your letters aren't what you thought they might be. Things I would do in your situation:
1. Reach out to the programs you interviewed at and ask for feedback- do not undervalue this, it may open doors for you too, and at the very least show a willingness not self-reflect, and get you noticed next year. Start with your home PD- why did they not take you?
2. Reach out to your letter writers and mentors about what could've gone wrong
3. Interview practice- for real, with someone who will tell you the truth. Chief Residents, residency PD/ aPDs and other fellowship PDs might be a good resource.
4. Application strategy: Was it simply that you were only really applying/ interviewing to the most competitive places and they did not share your research interests? 12 from 45 seems low for you. Expand your pool, interview at all places, rank anywhere you'd be OK going.
5. Publish publish publish (groan)
6. Finally, I am not saying this is what you did, but have seen top tier applicants interview at my program with a chip on their shoulder, lack of willingness to engage with other applicants etc, badmouthing the program they were interviewing etc, all it takes is one such comment to make you DNR (Do Not Rank), no single applicant is worth it when everyone is pretty much 99% identical on paper and stellar.

Good luck.
 
About the Ads
May 14, 2019
21
13
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Didn't match this year... damn.

AMG MD at top tier program, graduated from top tier medical school
Steps 250s/260s/240s
4 GI abstracts at ACG/DDW, 1 GI first author manuscript in submission, 3 pubs (2 first author) in non-GI journals
Typical residency leadership roles/involvement but no chief year
LORs strong, from regionally (but maybe not nationally) known faculty
Applied to 45, invited to 12, made it to 10 interviews and ranked all 10. Letter of interest to my #1.

Pedigree is not everything, my friends.
Dear I’m so sorry to hear that. Like others said you have an awesome cv. I think getting feedback is a great suggestion along with practicing interviews skills. Apply broadly next cycle and continue to improve your cv. I think 1 year of Hepatology would be a good idea or Motility (I personally love motility!).
I practiced my interviews with my Chief resident. I’m sure you can talk to your PD or APD about couching!
Best of luck! Do not give up! This is very unfortunate but you will be fine next year!
 
Dec 12, 2019
1
1
Status
Attending Physician
Long time lurker. Thank you to all that have contributed to this thread over the past year and previous threads as well. It's all been very great.

US MD at mid tier Uni program, currently Academic hospitalist for gap year while S/O finished residency.
Steps 230s/240s/230s
12 GI abstracts at ACG/DDW/ATC, 1 first author manuscript and another prelim accepted, 3 other pubs 2nd-4th author
Application: 40 programs due to geographic constraints, 8 interviews ranked all 8
Matched at #2!!!

Any suggestions on things to read/study before starting?

Already passed ABIM so able to focus on strictly GI material during my long cold nights on the wards
 
  • Like
Reactions: A_GI
Jul 25, 2019
23
24
Status
Attending Physician
Long time lurker. Thank you to all that have contributed to this thread over the past year and previous threads as well. It's all been very great.

US MD at mid tier Uni program, currently Academic hospitalist for gap year while S/O finished residency.
Steps 230s/240s/230s
12 GI abstracts at ACG/DDW/ATC, 1 first author manuscript and another prelim accepted, 3 other pubs 2nd-4th author
Application: 40 programs due to geographic constraints, 8 interviews ranked all 8
Matched at #2!!!

Any suggestions on things to read/study before starting?

Already passed ABIM so able to focus on strictly GI material during my long cold nights on the wards
Congrats!

This is a good question. Interested in hearing experts opinion. I read this article on starting GI fellowship, I think it's helpful. Navigating a Successful Course Through GI Fellowship: A Year-by-Year Perspective
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lactulose Enema

coconutwater16

2+ Year Member
Sep 6, 2015
24
17
Status
Medical Student
I am writing in support of everything cabergoline2 wrote. I wanted to share my perspective of the GI application process. I had to apply twice and matched the second time.

US AMG MD
Did residency at a mid tier university program. Was well reputed for my clinical skills.
Currently in midst of a one year advanced fellowship.
USMLE: 240s/240s/230s. Everything passed in first try.
Research: 1 publication as first author, 1 publication as 2nd author. By the time I applied the second time, I had a first author manuscript provisionally accepted. 10+ ACG poster presentations including recognition for one of them.

During my first time applying, I applied to 75 programs and received 20 interviews. Attended 18 of them. Was completely normal/enthusiastic at my interviews and did not ask or do anything inappropriate. Interviewed at few so-called "elite" programs. I was heartbroken, devastated and blindsided when I didn't match. It led to a year of tremendous emotional anguish and anxiety.

During second time applying, I applied to 115 programs and received 11 interviews. Am in midst of an advanced fellowship. Matched successfully.

I wanted to echo some of the things similar to what cabergoline 2 wrote.

1) AMG >> IMG: The stats speak for themselves. There is an inherent bias against IMGs in the selection process. Some programs filter out IMGs from the start. Some invite them for interviews but don't rank them at all or highly. It is very unfair as many are extremely smart and well-qualified and have tons of impressive research.
2) Pedigree, pedigree, pedigree. Programs are obsessed with pedigree. This is the biggest and most important factor in deciding whether you match. Academic GI people feel so much better about themselves, their departments and even the lives of their children are enriched when surrounded by people with so-called pedigree. It is not that residents from these so-called elite institutions are clinically better or have more research. As a friend said who is a GI attending and was in the room when making their program's rank list, their institution did not even open candidates' files or even their interview performances when making the rank list. They simply started ranking based off perceived elite status of their residency programs. Pedigree, pedigree, pedigree.
3) Cabergoline2 said "A large part of the match is decided before the match." This is really true. So much of the match is decided by phone calls between GI divisions. If one EUS guy calls another EUS guy for a spot, the candidate has a spot even if he is not that great. It is an "election campaign" as stated above. It is unfair and screws over the people who really busted their butts. One PD said to me "We are using the fellowship program to enhance our division's blueprint even beyond the region and increase our profile nationally. We are interviewing candidates from all over the country and will look to rank accordingly as well."
4) It is competitive as hell. Most places have 2-3 spots, with one spot being kept internally. This leaves 1 spot open for all the externals interviewing. A community program matched its 2 spots this year by # 7 on their rank list. I know a low-tier university program who matched their 3 spots last year by #8. It is really competitive.
5) Do not believe anything your home program says. There were several attendings at my residency program who were very supportive of my candidacy and said very promising things. Unfortunately even though they were were true supporters, they were not involved in making the rank list. The PD, however, was dishonest/duplicitous with me. I know of programs who have not taken their Chief Residents.
6) Do not believe anything other programs say. Outside programs are also dishonest during the process.
7) Programs interview too many people. The community program I mentioned above interviewed 30 people this year for 2 spots. One university program interviewed 54 people for their 3 spots (one they were holding internally). It is such a waste of time, energy, money and sleep on everyone's part.
8) Interviews play a role but a lot of programs already have a predetermined rank list before you even show up. At one of my interviews last year, the chairman had already circled "Rank in the middle" on his interview score sheet for me before I even walked into my interview with him. If a program is thinking of ranking you in the middle based off their preconceived judgment, it is very difficult to jump to #2 on their rank list. I have spoken with many people over the past 2 years who have said interviews were important but not a make or break deal. Also on your interviews, be prepared for some of your interviewers to have never opened your application. Roll with it and try your best. Always be enthusiastic and engaging at your interviews.
9) Have a back-up plan. I know this sounds crazy but not matching is a realistic possibility for all of us. I never imagined it for me and was completely blindsided and devastated by it. The match rate is 65%. Roughly 800 people apply for 500 spots. I know a person who was very well qualified who matched at #14 on his rank list of 14. Last year, one of the posters here on SDN (who interviewed at similar programs as me) matched at his #11. You can be 2 spots away from matching at your # 1 or not matching at all. Try to have a list of advanced fellowships you can apply for. Hepatology, transplant hepatology, IBD, motility and nutrition fellowships are all options. Be careful in picking as a lot of these programs are looking for cheap labor and do not give any internal consideration nor help you in securing a GI spot elsewhere. These advanced fellowship spots often fill up shortly after match day so be prepared. As for taking a job after residency if you do not match, I would have loved to take a job but I have heard from few academic GI people that a job is frowned upon. Apparently the thinking is that this person may not be able to work the fellowship hours or be able to follow orders/hierarchy from an attending. Obviously there are examples of people with jobs matching too when reapplying. I received fewer interviews during my second time applying as I wrote above even with an advanced fellowship.
10) Luck. Luck plays a huge role in the process. I know people who have matched with one case report and others with 2 ACG poster presentations. I know people who have matched who were lazy and did not go to the bedside to evaluate a patient who was crashing at 2 AM. It is all part of the process.
11) Only pursue GI if you really want it. The research was time consuming and at times overwhelming. The application process twice was challenging. It has been a lot of work. Only do it if you really like the field.

I wish everyone tremendous luck and success. I am pulling for everyone and wishing you well. As for me, I am relieved and ecstatic to get my spot and all my family and friends are really happy for me. Good luck.
 

coconutwater16

2+ Year Member
Sep 6, 2015
24
17
Status
Medical Student
Didn't match this year... damn.

AMG MD at top tier program, graduated from top tier medical school
Steps 250s/260s/240s
4 GI abstracts at ACG/DDW, 1 GI first author manuscript in submission, 3 pubs (2 first author) in non-GI journals
Typical residency leadership roles/involvement but no chief year
LORs strong, from regionally (but maybe not nationally) known faculty
Applied to 45, invited to 12, made it to 10 interviews and ranked all 10. Letter of interest to my #1.

Pedigree is not everything, my friends.
I am so sorry my friend. I had a similar experience last year. I was completely devastated and blindsided by it. Not matching led to a year of tremendous anxiety and trauma for me. I am really really pulling for you and wish you lots of luck. Consider doing an advanced fellowship spot in Hepatology, transplant hepatology, IBD, motility or nutrition. This whole application process has become really competitive.

You had a really tough break this year. I am sure you worked really hard during residency and interviewed well. It is nothing that you did on your part that led to you not matching. Your application is excellent. The only thing you need is luck.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bar
OP
ShiShiMD

ShiShiMD

2+ Year Member
Jun 20, 2016
451
244
East Coast
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
I am writing in support of everything cabergoline2 wrote. I wanted to share my perspective of the GI application process. I had to apply twice and matched the second time.

US AMG MD
Did residency at a mid tier university program. Was well reputed for my clinical skills.
Currently in midst of a one year advanced fellowship.
USMLE: 240s/240s/230s. Everything passed in first try.
Research: 1 publication as first author, 1 publication as 2nd author. By the time I applied the second time, I had a first author manuscript provisionally accepted. 10+ ACG poster presentations including recognition for one of them.

During my first time applying, I applied to 75 programs and received 20 interviews. Attended 18 of them. Was completely normal/enthusiastic at my interviews and did not ask or do anything inappropriate. Interviewed at few so-called "elite" programs. I was heartbroken, devastated and blindsided when I didn't match. It led to a year of tremendous emotional anguish and anxiety.

During second time applying, I applied to 115 programs and received 11 interviews. Am in midst of an advanced fellowship. Matched successfully.

I wanted to echo some of the things similar to what cabergoline 2 wrote.

1) AMG >> IMG: The stats speak for themselves. There is an inherent bias against IMGs in the selection process. Some programs filter out IMGs from the start. Some invite them for interviews but don't rank them at all or highly. It is very unfair as many are extremely smart and well-qualified and have tons of impressive research.
2) Pedigree, pedigree, pedigree. Programs are obsessed with pedigree. This is the biggest and most important factor in deciding whether you match. Academic GI people feel so much better about themselves, their departments and even the lives of their children are enriched when surrounded by people with so-called pedigree. It is not that residents from these so-called elite institutions are clinically better or have more research. As a friend said who is a GI attending and was in the room when making their program's rank list, their institution did not even open candidates' files or even their interview performances when making the rank list. They simply started ranking based off perceived elite status of their residency programs. Pedigree, pedigree, pedigree.
3) Cabergoline2 said "A large part of the match is decided before the match." This is really true. So much of the match is decided by phone calls between GI divisions. If one EUS guy calls another EUS guy for a spot, the candidate has a spot even if he is not that great. It is an "election campaign" as stated above. It is unfair and screws over the people who really busted their butts. One PD said to me "We are using the fellowship program to enhance our division's blueprint even beyond the region and increase our profile nationally. We are interviewing candidates from all over the country and will look to rank accordingly as well."
4) It is competitive as hell. Most places have 2-3 spots, with one spot being kept internally. This leaves 1 spot open for all the externals interviewing. A community program matched its 2 spots this year by # 7 on their rank list. I know a low-tier university program who matched their 3 spots last year by #8. It is really competitive.
5) Do not believe anything your home program says. There were several attendings at my residency program who were very supportive of my candidacy and said very promising things. Unfortunately even though they were were true supporters, they were not involved in making the rank list. The PD, however, was dishonest/duplicitous with me. I know of programs who have not taken their Chief Residents.
6) Do not believe anything other programs say. Outside programs are also dishonest during the process.
7) Programs interview too many people. The community program I mentioned above interviewed 30 people this year for 2 spots. One university program interviewed 54 people for their 3 spots (one they were holding internally). It is such a waste of time, energy, money and sleep on everyone's part.
8) Interviews play a role but a lot of programs already have a predetermined rank list before you even show up. At one of my interviews last year, the chairman had already circled "Rank in the middle" on his interview score sheet for me before I even walked into my interview with him. If a program is thinking of ranking you in the middle based off their preconceived judgment, it is very difficult to jump to #2 on their rank list. I have spoken with many people over the past 2 years who have said interviews were important but not a make or break deal. Also on your interviews, be prepared for some of your interviewers to have never opened your application. Roll with it and try your best. Always be enthusiastic and engaging at your interviews.
9) Have a back-up plan. I know this sounds crazy but not matching is a realistic possibility for all of us. I never imagined it for me and was completely blindsided and devastated by it. The match rate is 65%. Roughly 800 people apply for 500 spots. I know a person who was very well qualified who matched at #14 on his rank list of 14. Last year, one of the posters here on SDN (who interviewed at similar programs as me) matched at his #11. You can be 2 spots away from matching at your # 1 or not matching at all. Try to have a list of advanced fellowships you can apply for. Hepatology, transplant hepatology, IBD, motility and nutrition fellowships are all options. Be careful in picking as a lot of these programs are looking for cheap labor and do not give any internal consideration nor help you in securing a GI spot elsewhere. These advanced fellowship spots often fill up shortly after match day so be prepared. As for taking a job after residency if you do not match, I would have loved to take a job but I have heard from few academic GI people that a job is frowned upon. Apparently the thinking is that this person may not be able to work the fellowship hours or be able to follow orders/hierarchy from an attending. Obviously there are examples of people with jobs matching too when reapplying. I received fewer interviews during my second time applying as I wrote above even with an advanced fellowship.
10) Luck. Luck plays a huge role in the process. I know people who have matched with one case report and others with 2 ACG poster presentations. I know people who have matched who were lazy and did not go to the bedside to evaluate a patient who was crashing at 2 AM. It is all part of the process.
11) Only pursue GI if you really want it. The research was time consuming and at times overwhelming. The application process twice was challenging. It has been a lot of work. Only do it if you really like the field.

I wish everyone tremendous luck and success. I am pulling for everyone and wishing you well. As for me, I am relieved and ecstatic to get my spot and all my family and friends are really happy for me. Good luck.
I am so sorry my friend. I had a similar experience last year. I was completely devastated and blindsided by it. Not matching led to a year of tremendous anxiety and trauma for me. I am really really pulling for you and wish you lots of luck. Consider doing an advanced fellowship spot in Hepatology, transplant hepatology, IBD, motility or nutrition. This whole application process has become really competitive.

You had a really tough break this year. I am sure you worked really hard during residency and interviewed well. It is nothing that you did on your part that led to you not matching. Your application is excellent. The only thing you need is luck.
I don’t understand. You are in advance year now but you were in the same position last year (not being matched).
Or you are doing some advance fellowship and matched 4 years ago.
 
OP
ShiShiMD

ShiShiMD

2+ Year Member
Jun 20, 2016
451
244
East Coast
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
So for everyone’s Info:

advance means interventional.

IBD or Motility are all 1 month mini fellowships.

Transplant Hep is only offered at one or maybe two places who don’t end up filling up if you haven’t done GI fellowship.

Hep fellowship is awesome way to boost your CV is one year long mostly done at transplant Hep centers with GI fellowship.

Nutrition is almost now integrated in all major programs for instance my program will give you a degree/ diploma saying.
Dr. Cxx Did his or her
Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Fellowship.

Doing anything other than Hepatology is useless.

I have a different stand on the pedigree:

AMG=Elite IMG
AMG>IMG (US IMG)
IMG> FMG

home program plays a huge part. Research and new innovation plays a huge part.

but some one picking up the phone and calling for a EUS spot is a joke. They just trying to hook their friends up with a modern day slave.
 

GastriqueGraffin

2+ Year Member
Jul 20, 2017
384
353
So for everyone’s Info:

advance means interventional.

IBD or Motility are all 1 month mini fellowships.

Transplant Hep is only offered at one or maybe two places who don’t end up filling up if you haven’t done GI fellowship.

Hep fellowship is awesome way to boost your CV is one year long mostly done at transplant Hep centers with GI fellowship.

Nutrition is almost now integrated in all major programs for instance my program will give you a degree/ diploma saying.
Dr. Cxx Did his or her
Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Fellowship.

Doing anything other than Hepatology is useless.

I have a different stand on the pedigree:

AMG=Elite IMG
AMG>IMG (US IMG)
IMG> FMG

home program plays a huge part. Research and new innovation plays a huge part.

but some one picking up the phone and calling for a EUS spot is a joke. They just trying to hook their friends up with a modern day slave.
IBD and Motility are all 1 month? That’s news to me.
 

coconutwater16

2+ Year Member
Sep 6, 2015
24
17
Status
Medical Student
Hey shishimd thanks for your response. I didn't match last year and matched this year. If you read my post, I mention several times that I am using the word advanced to refer to Hep/Transplant Hep/Motility/IBD/Nutrition. I am in midst of an advanced year. I am clearly not referring to interventional GI which is not an option pre-GI fellowship.

Some institutions have 1 year long IBD and motility fellowships. They are available to pre-GI candidates.

Thank you for all your help and leadership on this forum. Hope you have a nice day today!
 
Jul 25, 2019
23
24
Status
Attending Physician
So for everyone’s Info:

advance means interventional.

IBD or Motility are all 1 month mini fellowships.

Transplant Hep is only offered at one or maybe two places who don’t end up filling up if you haven’t done GI fellowship.

Hep fellowship is awesome way to boost your CV is one year long mostly done at transplant Hep centers with GI fellowship.

Nutrition is almost now integrated in all major programs for instance my program will give you a degree/ diploma saying.
Dr. Cxx Did his or her
Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Fellowship.

Doing anything other than Hepatology is useless.

I have a different stand on the pedigree:

AMG=Elite IMG
AMG>IMG (US IMG)
IMG> FMG

home program plays a huge part. Research and new innovation plays a huge part.

but some one picking up the phone and calling for a EUS spot is a joke. They just trying to hook their friends up with a modern day slave.
- Can you clarify, I have seen 1 year IBD, not sure about motility. Also, I have seen people match after one year of clinical nutrition fellowship in prestigious institution, probably as it provided them with more research, connections, etc...

- By IMG (you mean US citizen who attended medical school abroad, while with FMG you mean non US who did medical school outside?)

-Elite IMG likely have went into top tier residency?

-I think by EUS, the writer meant someone known in EUS called for a candidate for a GI spot? Not EUS fellowship.

Thank you!
 
Last edited:
About the Ads

cabergoline2

2+ Year Member
Nov 22, 2015
305
210
Status
Medical Student
So for everyone’s Info:

advance means interventional.

IBD or Motility are all 1 month mini fellowships.

Transplant Hep is only offered at one or maybe two places who don’t end up filling up if you haven’t done GI fellowship.

Hep fellowship is awesome way to boost your CV is one year long mostly done at transplant Hep centers with GI fellowship.

Nutrition is almost now integrated in all major programs for instance my program will give you a degree/ diploma saying.
Dr. Cxx Did his or her
Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Fellowship.

Doing anything other than Hepatology is useless.

I have a different stand on the pedigree:

AMG=Elite IMG
AMG>IMG (US IMG)
IMG> FMG

home program plays a huge part. Research and new innovation plays a huge part.

but some one picking up the phone and calling for a EUS spot is a joke. They just trying to hook their friends up with a modern day slave.

there is no such thing as elite img ... it's an oxymoron.... it's coming from someone who has first author manuscripts in high impact journals , software patents and multiple awards including ones enough to cover an years salary of residency/fellowship.... they look at you and invite you maybe but in the end they treat you as a backup.... there are times when imgs end up in top tier...sometimes the program ended lower than expected...sometimes the person has a strong connection there ...sometimes due to political reasons ...


Most IMGs who are leaders in the field actually trained at mid-tier high volume centers.... i think a study that looks at output of "elite name brands" v/s mid tier places with a lot of imgs would be very fruitful and it would show some of the elite institutes there place... It would also help re-direct funding to institutes that are better able to utilize it rather than those which amass billions of dollars worth of endowment and don't use it efficiently ...
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: HardlyMedicinal

cabergoline2

2+ Year Member
Nov 22, 2015
305
210
Status
Medical Student
but some one picking up the phone and calling for a EUS spot is a joke. They just trying to hook their friends up with a modern day slave.
I think they are referring to a big name in EUS calling another big name in EUS for a general GI spot....
 
Apr 25, 2019
7
12
Status
Attending Physician
there is no such thing as elite img ... it's an oxymoron.... it's coming from someone who has first author manuscripts in high impact journals , software patents and multiple awards including ones enough to cover an years salary of residency/fellowship.... they look at you and invite you maybe but in the end they treat you as a backup.... there are times when imgs end up in top tier...sometimes the program ended lower than expected...sometimes the person has a strong connection there ...sometimes due to political reasons ...


Most IMGs who are leaders in the field actually trained at mid-tier high volume centers.... i think a study that looks at output of "elite name brands" v/s mid tier places with a lot of imgs would be very fruitful and it would show some of the elite institutes there place... It would also help re-direct funding to institutes that are better able to utilize it rather than those which amass billions of dollars worth of endowment and don't use it efficiently ...
Can we please stop with these snide remarks and obnoxious comparisons of "elite IMG-hating brands" and "mid-tier IMG loving places". You are not being helpful here. GI is hard enough. I don't know about you but getting in is a massive achievement!! Regardless of tier or brand. Many other countries in the world will not even give us an opportunity beyond primary care. Whatever life has given us, we can move on and make the most of it. It's easy to blame political reasons, connection or IMGs being back-up option for falling to a lower rank program but have you ever considered factors like applicant personality, quality of in-house or outside US MDs whom these interviewers have probably known for > 10 years. I think it's an absurd unfair conclusion to hastily label US MDs as not comparable in quality to IMGs or with less-bright prospects to IMGs in terms of being GI leaders. I also do not think, a program not matching IMGs equates to non-efficient use of endowment dollars. Nonetheless, many IMGs still squeeze into these "elite" programs anyways. I doubt anyone cares about a study comparing output of elite brands and IMGs. Mind you, if that study were ever done, you may be in for a shocker that may even provide hard evidence limiting IMG chances in future match.

Bro, even in sports where the rules are standard and each team plays under exact same conditions; there is the concept of home-advantage. Matching in GI, at any program tier, should be taken as a hard-earned "away" victory. Once you are done with fellowship; you forever also own a home advantage. You can use it how you wish.

Congrats on your match!
 
OP
ShiShiMD

ShiShiMD

2+ Year Member
Jun 20, 2016
451
244
East Coast
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
1 month IBD fellowship are offered by various institutions. You have to join the C and C foundation. 1 month motility is also offered via the ANMS at various institutions and you get a diploma at the end of the month with pretty enough exposure to competently navigate and manage IBD patients and interpret motility studies.
 
  • Like
Reactions: A_GI
OP
ShiShiMD

ShiShiMD

2+ Year Member
Jun 20, 2016
451
244
East Coast
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
In the end of the day doesn’t matter if you matched to a community or Harvard you still get paid the same. Well maybe more coming from community.
Anyone who wants GI and tries and doesn’t give up ends up matching.
 

GastriqueGraffin

2+ Year Member
Jul 20, 2017
384
353
1 month IBD fellowship are offered by various institutions. You have to join the C and C foundation. 1 month motility is also offered via the ANMS at various institutions and you get a diploma at the end of the month with pretty enough exposure to competently navigate and manage IBD patients and interpret motility studies.
Sure, they exist. But if you want to be an expert enough to actually be the motility or IBD person (usually academic) you pretty much have to do the year which is standard. You can technically learn any advanced skill as well without the year but again, if you want to be “the advanced person” you need the year.
 
Sep 8, 2019
34
15
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Hey shishimd thanks for your response. I didn't match last year and matched this year. If you read my post, I mention several times that I am using the word advanced to refer to Hep/Transplant Hep/Motility/IBD/Nutrition. I am in midst of an advanced year. I am clearly not referring to interventional GI which is not an option pre-GI fellowship.

Some institutions have 1 year long IBD and motility fellowships. They are available to pre-GI candidates.

Thank you for all your help and leadership on this forum. Hope you have a nice day today!
Why the passive aggressiveness?
 
Jul 25, 2019
23
24
Status
Attending Physician
1 month IBD fellowship are offered by various institutions. You have to join the C and C foundation. 1 month motility is also offered via the ANMS at various institutions and you get a diploma at the end of the month with pretty enough exposure to competently navigate and manage IBD patients and interpret motility studies.
Interesting to know!
 
OP
ShiShiMD

ShiShiMD

2+ Year Member
Jun 20, 2016
451
244
East Coast
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Sure, they exist. But if you want to be an expert enough to actually be the motility or IBD person (usually academic) you pretty much have to do the year which is standard. You can technically learn any advanced skill as well without the year but again, if you want to be “the advanced person” you need the year.
Maybe , maybe not. I did both. Is offered the advance person job at multiple universities.
Again no one has a crystal ball fir future job outcomes.
 
About the Ads
OP
ShiShiMD

ShiShiMD

2+ Year Member
Jun 20, 2016
451
244
East Coast
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
My children do not fight. You will all be awesome leaders and competent and compassionate Digestive Disease Specialists.

The force is strong in all of you.

now I need to continue seeing more baby Yoda.
 

AlexTheEvilOne

7+ Year Member
Aug 29, 2012
48
0
Status
Non-Student
Hey shishimd thanks for your response. I didn't match last year and matched this year. If you read my post, I mention several times that I am using the word advanced to refer to Hep/Transplant Hep/Motility/IBD/Nutrition. I am in midst of an advanced year. I am clearly not referring to interventional GI which is not an option pre-GI fellowship.

Some institutions have 1 year long IBD and motility fellowships. They are available to pre-GI candidates.

Thank you for all your help and leadership on this forum. Hope you have a nice day today!
Can anyone specify what IBD fellowships are available pre-GI?
 

coconutwater16

2+ Year Member
Sep 6, 2015
24
17
Status
Medical Student
Can anyone specify what IBD fellowships are available pre-GI?
Hey Alex thanks for your question. It is the same IBD fellowship programs that are available following GI fellowships. Some IBD programs fail to fill their spots and make them available to pre-GI candidates. One would have to individually email the IBD programs and ask if the programs have any unfilled spots.
 

aabs

2+ Year Member
Jan 3, 2017
11
4
Status
Medical Student
Hey Alex thanks for your question. It is the same IBD fellowship programs that are available following GI fellowships. Some IBD programs fail to fill their spots and make them available to pre-GI candidates. One would have to individually email the IBD programs and ask if the programs have any unfilled spots.

Thanks, any idea which have done this in the past? I would be very interested in this route as it would fit my plans very nicely.
 
Aug 3, 2019
54
36
Status
Attending Physician
Thanks, any idea which have done this in the past? I would be very interested in this route as it would fit my plans very nicely.
there are IBD spots open in few places. They would usually wait for a candidate who matched completed GI fellowship so that person can scope on their own but lot of times, they dont get any candidates, in which case, they would give it to pre fellowship applicants as well
 

1Cor1557

10+ Year Member
Jun 23, 2008
173
42
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Thanks, any idea which have done this in the past? I would be very interested in this route as it would fit my plans very nicely.
Goto to a gi or ibd conference for example aibd that just finished or CCF next month, you would be shocked at how many of the big names in the field end their talks asking for those interested in IBD fellowship to please raise your hand and approach them after the talk, just walk up to them and introduce yourself bring your business cards then email your cv after
 
  • Like
Reactions: ShiShiMD and A_GI
OP
ShiShiMD

ShiShiMD

2+ Year Member
Jun 20, 2016
451
244
East Coast
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Goto to a gi or ibd conference for example aibd that just finished or CCF next month, you would be shocked at how many of the big names in the field end their talks asking for those interested in IBD fellowship to please raise your hand and approach them after the talk, just walk up to them and introduce yourself bring your business cards then email your cv after
one of the best way of networking and getting a solid connection. This is a great advice
 

coconutwater16

2+ Year Member
Sep 6, 2015
24
17
Status
Medical Student
  • Like
Reactions: A_GI

1Cor1557

10+ Year Member
Jun 23, 2008
173
42
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Hello everyone,

Any good pocket books for GI? I found one but is very old.
GI Emergencies: A Quick Reference Guide
 
Nov 5, 2019
5
0
Status
Resident [Any Field]
Have been lurking this past year, congratulations to everyone who matched! Wondering if anyone had any idea if delaying ABIM until next August looks bad on the fellowship trail. A little background, I’ll be a chief resident next year. Don’t need ABIM certification for it, was told by my PD. I’ve been considering it as my wife and I are expecting twins this summer and also I’m trying to wrap up the research projects I’m currently engaged in and it would be a huge help if I could spread all these things out. Wondering if anyone has any experience or input on this?
 
Jul 25, 2019
23
24
Status
Attending Physician
Have been lurking this past year, congratulations to everyone who matched! Wondering if anyone had any idea if delaying ABIM until next August looks bad on the fellowship trail. A little background, I’ll be a chief resident next year. Don’t need ABIM certification for it, was told by my PD. I’ve been considering it as my wife and I are expecting twins this summer and also I’m trying to wrap up the research projects I’m currently engaged in and it would be a huge help if I could spread all these things out. Wondering if anyone has any experience or input on this?
Speaking as someone who applied several years after residency and in several interviews it was only brought up one time. So overall not that big of deal.
One potential scenario if your step scores are low, then passing ABIM would provide the program with reassurance that passing GI boards in the future is not a problem.

So It depends on the rest of your credentials, if top residency, chief and good publications, I can't see how it will affect you.
 
  • Like
Reactions: drleggo

Lccjblu

7+ Year Member
Jul 31, 2010
359
42
Status
Medical Student
Have been lurking this past year, congratulations to everyone who matched! Wondering if anyone had any idea if delaying ABIM until next August looks bad on the fellowship trail. A little background, I’ll be a chief resident next year. Don’t need ABIM certification for it, was told by my PD. I’ve been considering it as my wife and I are expecting twins this summer and also I’m trying to wrap up the research projects I’m currently engaged in and it would be a huge help if I could spread all these things out. Wondering if anyone has any experience or input on this?
From an application perspective, I don’t think anyone really checks to see if you are board certified, maybe if you are a few years out.

The real question is, for you, what is the best time to do it. Things to consider: Yes, twins are going to be a handful, but I imagine that your IM knowledge will be fresher this year, you will have more time to study and will be on call less. The learning curve as a Gi fellow in the first few months is quite steep. Keep in mind that the test is ultimately pass/fail and most people pass. Getting it out of the way may be less trouble down the line.
 
  • Like
Reactions: drleggo

coconutwater16

2+ Year Member
Sep 6, 2015
24
17
Status
Medical Student
Have been lurking this past year, congratulations to everyone who matched! Wondering if anyone had any idea if delaying ABIM until next August looks bad on the fellowship trail. A little background, I’ll be a chief resident next year. Don’t need ABIM certification for it, was told by my PD. I’ve been considering it as my wife and I are expecting twins this summer and also I’m trying to wrap up the research projects I’m currently engaged in and it would be a huge help if I could spread all these things out. Wondering if anyone has any experience or input on this?
Agree with all written above by lccjblue.

I was explicitly asked at 2 of my interviews about whether I had taken the IM Boards. One of those interviews was later in the interview season after the IM Board results had been released. The follow-up question at that program was "Did you pass the boards?"

Another scenario one must think of is what if you do not match into GI. Not matching is a realistic possibility for every single applicant applying for GI. As a good number of IM jobs look for IM Board certification, this may potentially affect your job prospects if the need arises.

Good luck!
 
About the Ads