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Official 3rd Year Book List

Bevo

Radiology, R1
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  1. Resident [Any Field]
    Usmle Step 2 Secrets
    by Adam, M.D. Brochert
    ISBN: 156053608

    Mksap for Students: Medical Knowledge Self-Assessment Program
    ISBN: 1930513445

    Stepup To Internal Medicine (Stepup Series)
    ISBN: 0781747872
    or
    First Aid for the Medicine Clerkship
    ISBN: 0071364218

    Surgical Recall
    ISBN: 0781729734

    Surgery : PreTest Self-Assessment and Review: 9th Edit
    ISBN: 0071412999

    Medicine: PreTest Self-Assessment and Review (PreTest Series)
    ISBN: 007140287

    Blueprints Psychiatry (Blueprints)
    ISBN: 1405103345

    Blueprints Pediatrics (Blueprints)
    ISBN: 1405103337

    Blueprints Obstetrics and Gynecology (Blueprints)
    ISBN: 1405103310
     
    Looks pretty good...here's what I used (if I can remember correctly)...

    Medicine: Pre-Test Physical Diagnosis and Medicine, NMS
    Surgery: Recall, Lawrence
    Peds: Blueprints
    OB/GYN: Blueprints, little red book
    Psych: Blueprints, Current Clinical Strategies (little green book)
     
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    Hawk22

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      I'm half way through 3rd year and here are my recomendations so far:

      1. Medicine: MKSAP (the best single book to study by far), First Aid for Medicine, Dubin's EKG Book, and Pretest.
      NOTE DO NOT waste your money on Appleton and Lange, its worthless.

      2. Surgery: Lawrence (my favorite book in medical school so far, its just fantastic!), Appleton and Lang, Pretest, and Case Files (very, very good). If you want a review book, BRS was pretty good and I personally didn't think that Blueprints looked all that great. Friends of mine used the NMS Case book and seemed to like it.

      3. Psych: BRS (excellent), Pretest, and Blueprints Clinical Cases. I was very underwhelmed when I flipped through the Blueprints Psych book.

      4. OB: Blueprints was OK, but I thought BRS was much better. Pretest was excellent, Appleton and Lange was just ok. I heard great things about the Case Files book for OB, but didn't use it myself.

      Haven't had Peds or Family yet, so I can't help you there.

      All in all, I've had pretty good results from using a primary text and/or Up-To-Date for in-depth reading, a review book, a case book, and a question book for each class.
       

      KidDr

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        Hawk22 said:
        2. Surgery: Lawrence (my favorite book in medical school so far, its just fantastic!), Appleton and Lang, Pretest, and Case Files (very, very good). If you want a review book, BRS was pretty good and I personally didn't think that Blueprints looked all that great. Friends of mine used the NMS Case book and seemed to like it.

        I did peds surgery for the entire 6 weeks of my surgery rotation. The only thing I read during the rotation was Blueprints cover to cover and I did well on the Surgery shelf exam, despite being at a disadvantage from only having seen peds surg. However, I'd also already done my medicine rotation, which I think also helped with the shelf. To each their own, I guess...

        Also, USMLE Step 2 Secrets is a great book to read through a few days before you take Step 2, and I'd also recommend Boards and Wards by Ayala. It's helpful both during rotations and it's a great resource for Step 2.
        :luck:
         

        Bevo

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          thanks.

          I've been thinking about adding the boards and wards book, lawrence for surgery, and CMDT.
          I'm not a fan of the BRS series as a whole, so I'll be avoiding those books if I can.

          thanks for the help.
           

          StudKnight

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            lmbebo said:
            Usmle Step 2 Secrets
            by Adam, M.D. Brochert
            ISBN: 156053608

            Mksap for Students: Medical Knowledge Self-Assessment Program
            ISBN: 1930513445

            Stepup To Internal Medicine (Stepup Series)
            ISBN: 0781747872
            or
            First Aid for the Medicine Clerkship
            ISBN: 0071364218

            Surgical Recall
            ISBN: 0781729734

            Surgery : PreTest Self-Assessment and Review: 9th Edit
            ISBN: 0071412999

            Medicine: PreTest Self-Assessment and Review (PreTest Series)
            ISBN: 007140287

            Blueprints Psychiatry (Blueprints)
            ISBN: 1405103345

            Blueprints Pediatrics (Blueprints)
            ISBN: 1405103337

            Blueprints Obstetrics and Gynecology (Blueprints)
            ISBN: 1405103310


            For medicine, Step Up is much better than First Aid. I've been using stepup for my medicine rotation last 2 months and it is awesome. It covers everything and does so clearly and concisely.

            I'm not a big fan of Blueprints books. I think you can do better than that for Peds, psych and ob/gyn.
             

            grounded

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              Also, before you start your rotations, check out the Pocket Dilation Guide(pocketdilationguide.com). Everyone should have one before their OB rotation. It will help teach you cervical dilation measurments you will be responsible to know when you get there.
               

              bigfrank

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                Medicine: MKSAP-2, PreTest
                Pediatrics: Blueprints, Appleton & Lange question book
                Family Medicine: Blueprints
                Psychiatry: Appleton & Lange question book, PreTest
                Surgery: take medicine first, Surgery Recall, Appleton & Lange question book, PreTest
                Ob-Gyn: Blueprints, PreTest, Blueprints A&A Step 2
                Neuro: Blueprints, PreTest
                 

                DOtobe

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                1. Attending Physician
                  Aren't there stickies above of recommended books for different rotations? Try those if nobody else responds here.

                  I used mostly Blueprints for all my rotations, and Hacker and Moore for Ob/Gyn. Most of your reading for rotations can be done on Up to Date, too.
                   
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                  Peanuts

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                    StepUp is a bit more comprehensive than First Aid. I felt like First Aid was terribly bare bones. I started with it first but it'd take me forever b/c I'd have to keep referring to other sources so as not to feel like I was memorizing lists. So, StepUp is good if you like something that flows. It's got sentences and is readable. I liked the quickhits too. I wished I had finished it sooner so I could've run through First Aid quickly afterwards. I barely finished StepUp.

                    You can be selective though when going through StepUp. Then perhaps save 3 days or something to go through First Aid. I dunno... just a thought. In general First Aid hits some good stuff. It's great for review b/c it doesn't have a lot of the clutter when you're trying to hit the high points; it's focused. This bare-bones style is usually only helpful for me once I already have an understanding of the material, which I think StepUp was good for, without having to refer to big textbooks etc...

                    StudKnight said:
                    For medicine, Step Up is much better than First Aid. I've been using stepup for my medicine rotation last 2 months and it is awesome. It covers everything and does so clearly and concisely.

                    I'm not a big fan of Blueprints books. I think you can do better than that for Peds, psych and ob/gyn.

                    But I do agree, StepUp is pretty concise while still being comprehensive.
                     

                    ORS

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                      Not that it helps, but here is what I used

                      Peds:
                      Blueprints (the best one of the series)
                      Pretest (I only did about 150 questions as this was my first rotation)
                      ** Look at the section on peds in First Aid for the Wards----this is high yeild for the shelf**

                      Neuro:
                      Blueprints
                      Pretest
                      ****I would not roeccomend this combination as I did terrible on the shelf***

                      EM:
                      Blueprints Clinical cases
                      I did not buy a question book as our test was based on our manual

                      FM:
                      NMS Q&A for Family Medicine (great book, but may be getting dated)

                      Medicine:
                      First Aid
                      Dubins EKG book
                      Pretest (not that great)
                      Blueprints clinical cases (awesome)
                      **Note this combination worked great for me, but I recommend that MKSAP book***

                      Surgery:
                      Recall (just use it for the wards, you do not need to read the whole thing)
                      Blueprints clinical cases (awesome)
                      Blueprints questions and answers (about 100 questions)
                      A & L (there is one chapter in there that I used ~ 50 questions
                      **DO not buy Lawrence (waste of time and money, as the shelf is mostly medicine)

                      OB/GYN:
                      First aid (awesome)
                      Pretest (great)
                      Blueprints clinical cases (awesome)

                      Psych:
                      First aid (great)
                      Appleton and Lange questions (ignore about half of the chapters, but the rest is great)

                      This worked for me, hope this helps.
                       

                      gunit07

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                        ORS said:
                        Not that it helps, but here is what I used

                        Neuro:
                        Blueprints
                        Pretest
                        ****I would not roeccomend this combination as I did terrible on the shelf***


                        so... if this combination isnt good... any other suggestions?

                        our school recommends cecil's for neuro... but that's a HUGE book to lug around... any review books?
                         

                        VentdependenT

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                          gunit07 said:
                          so... if this combination isnt good... any other suggestions?

                          our school recommends cecil's for neuro... but that's a HUGE book to lug around... any review books?


                          Lange clinical neurology is an excellent text if you can get your hands on it. Just hit the big topics and you'll be a neuro master. Relatively slim text. Not something I would try and cram before a test though.
                           

                          madcadaver

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                            Medicine:
                            Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine (I would focus on pages 1-2500, but 2501-3000 may push you to the next level). I found that reviewing each issue of New England Journal of Medicine from 1996-2005 was also quite helpful (though I couldn't find the Feb 11, 1999 issue and may have missed something).


                            Surgery:
                            You should spend the bulk of your prep time practicing your Whipple technique for the practical portion of the shelf exam. As others have said, the exam is heavy on medicine so you should re-read the material in the Medicine section. Twice. For specific surgery topics, it focuses almost exclusively on podiatry so concentrate on that and you will be fine.


                            Family Medicine:
                            If you have a family, study them. Do not forget to screen them for depression and alcoholism. If you do not have a family, you will fail. Start applying to law school.


                            OB/GYN:
                            During your rotation, delivered a baby. Good job! Hopefully while you were doing this you had a video camera zoomed in as close as possible on the birth canal. Watching this footage over and over again, in slow motion, for 48 hours straight prior to your shelf exam should prepare you splendidly.


                            Pediatrics:
                            Blueprints is good for this.


                            Psych:
                            Are you really studying to do well in your shelf exam, honor the rotation, and match into the residency of your dreams? Or are you repressing latent feelings of resentment for your mother? Think about it.
                             

                            Pox in a box

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                              madcadaver said:
                              Medicine:
                              Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine (I would focus on pages 1-2500, but 2501-3000 may push you to the next level). I found that reviewing each issue of New England Journal of Medicine from 1996-2005 was also quite helpful (though I couldn't find the Feb 11, 1999 issue and may have missed something).


                              Surgery:
                              You should spend the bulk of your prep time practicing your Whipple technique for the practical portion of the shelf exam. As others have said, the exam is heavy on medicine so you should re-read the material in the Medicine section. Twice. For specific surgery topics, it focuses almost exclusively on podiatry so concentrate on that and you will be fine.


                              Family Medicine:
                              If you have a family, study them. Do not forget to screen them for depression and alcoholism. If you do not have a family, you will fail. Start applying to law school.


                              OB/GYN:
                              During your rotation, delivered a baby. Good job! Hopefully while you were doing this you had a video camera zoomed in as close as possible on the birth canal. Watching this footage over and over again, in slow motion, for 48 hours straight prior to your shelf exam should prepare you splendidly.


                              Pediatrics:
                              Blueprints is good for this.


                              Psych:
                              Are you really studying to do well in your shelf exam, honor the rotation, and match into the residency of your dreams? Or are you repressing latent feelings of resentment for your mother? Think about it.


                              Are these recommendations legit? Seem to be a bit lofty (especially the Harrison's and NEJM plug)...
                               

                              DOtobe

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                                Pox in a box said:
                                Are these recommendations legit? Seem to be a bit lofty (especially the Harrison's and NEJM plug)...

                                I think he/she is being sarcastic.

                                i.e.
                                madcadaver said:
                                If you do not have a family, you will fail. Start applying to law school.
                                and
                                madcadaver said:
                                For specific surgery topics, it focuses almost exclusively on podiatry so concentrate on that and you will be fine.

                                The peds advice is legit, though. :)
                                 
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                                Long Dong

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                                  JayZee said:
                                  does anybody know the answer to this?
                                  MKSAP 12 and 13 are aimed for residents and interns, one of my interns was using 13 when I did medicine. I used mksap 2 for students and most other students would recommend it, but I think there is a 3 out now for students. I also know of two of my classmates who did mksap 13 during the IM rotation, but these guys where superstars, I'm just a mear mortal.
                                   

                                  JayZee

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                                    Long Dong said:
                                    MKSAP 12 and 13 are aimed for residents and interns, one of my interns was using 13 when I did medicine. I used mksap 2 for students and most other students would recommend it, but I think there is a 3 out now for students. I also know of two of my classmates who did mksap 13 during the IM rotation, but these guys where superstars, I'm just a mear mortal.
                                    thanks LD ;)
                                     

                                    UndecidedMD

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                                      Long Dong said:
                                      MKSAP 12 and 13 are aimed for residents and interns, one of my interns was using 13 when I did medicine. I used mksap 2 for students and most other students would recommend it, but I think there is a 3 out now for students. I also know of two of my classmates who did mksap 13 during the IM rotation, but these guys where superstars, I'm just a mear mortal.

                                      With MKSAP, I see it is paperback with a cd? How are people using this book? Are you reading it cover to cover and then using the cd for practice qs? How exactly is this book organized?
                                       

                                      jojo14

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                                        UndecidedMD said:
                                        With MKSAP, I see it is paperback with a cd? How are people using this book? Are you reading it cover to cover and then using the cd for practice qs? How exactly is this book organized?

                                        The whole book is q & a only with explanations to the answers in the back. The questions are written by NBME peeps though, which is why it is so useful. The cd is the same exact q & a, so you can choose book or cd, whichever format works for you. I used the book at the hospital and the cd at home but it is the same info in both.
                                         

                                        StudentDoc327

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                                          izzy08 said:
                                          any good suggestions for family medicine, I always seem to buy too many books :)


                                          Thats a tough one to have first... I dont know what you could use sorry



                                          But I can say if you have it last and did well on your other shelves, you dont need to study for it. I would just study for step II.
                                           

                                          RugbyJC

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                                            Is the Kaplan Medicine book sufficient (if I actually read it)? I was hoping to use one book with content and one question book and have the Kaplan for free. No one has posted anything one way or another about if it is a good or bad study source for the shelf.
                                             

                                            amfrank

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                                              Ferri's Clinical Advisor is the one book that I wish I had known about at the beginning of 3rd year. It would have been extremely helpful in my family medicine rotation and was extremely helpful in my internal medicine and surgery rotations.

                                              You can search by both signs/symptoms or diseases. The book is concise and in easy to read bullet form. It includes signs/symptoms, a short synapsis of the disease, and current treatments. It also includes how to interpret the major lab tests. This book has everything you need referencewise in one place! It is rather expensive, but this is a book you will use for years to come!
                                               
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                                              toshioknzo

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                                                Uhm...sorry people. Not to interrupt, but I just wish somebody could clarify to me what book should a 3rd year medical student use? I'm a 3rd year (starting my clinical phase in UK, August this year).

                                                I am so so so confuse and worried on which book should I use. I bought some books for my first phase, and it's totally useless... not all, but I just feel that it's a waste. Books at my place don't come cheap. :( That's why I need a good "starter's kit" :) Uhm...I prefer books which tell me 'stories'. What I mean is ...uhm...the flow, understandable for a 3rd year type. And I definitely want to stray away from super lengthy and super detailed texts!

                                                Uhm...what's up with the step up, step down,first aid thingy? Sorry for being such a noobie!!!

                                                Well, help me with my booklist ppl. I think I'm gonna get kumar n clark clinical med, oxford clinical handbook and clinical anatomy. Any additions? What about Physical exam and history taking??


                                                Thanks in advance :)
                                                 

                                                MonkeyRalph

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                                                  Now that I'm officially done with 3rd year, I felt I should comment.
                                                  For each clerkship, here's what I used:

                                                  Neurology:
                                                  Clinical Neuroanatomy Made Ridiculously Simple (this was useful for the rotation, but I did not have to take a shelf for this rotation)

                                                  Surgery:
                                                  Platinum Vignettes for Trauma & Surgery (very helpful)
                                                  Pre-Test Surgery (concentrate on the high yield sections like GI, etc)
                                                  Surgical Recall (awesome to read the relevant page before a case or lecture)
                                                  Besides these three books, I used some notes from my school and honored the shelf and the rotation, so I would say these are pretty useful.

                                                  Peds:
                                                  All I used was Harriet Lane for the wards and First Aid Peds and Pre-Test Peds for the shelf. I got high pass on both the shelf and rotation.

                                                  Psych:
                                                  Only used First Aid Psych. This was an easy shelf exam and an easy rotation.

                                                  OB/GYN:
                                                  First Aid OB/GYN (it was ok, but some people prefer blueprints)
                                                  Obstetrical Pearls (useless, unless you want to do OBGYN)
                                                  Casefiles OB/GYN (AWESOME, this book was literally like a cheat sheet for the shelf; definitely the most useful shelf review book for all of third year)
                                                  I got high pass on both the shelf and rotation, but would recommend just using casefiles if you want a guaranteed pass without wanting to spend alot of time reading.

                                                  Medicine:
                                                  MKSAP for Students 3 (questions are very similar to the shelf)
                                                  First Aid for Medicine (really good review of alot of info, but you need more for the wards)
                                                  Casefiles for Medicine (not as helpful as it was for OB/GYN, but still good with the "what is the next step?" questions)
                                                  UpToDate (I just read up on all my patients, 1 topic per day)
                                                  Sabatine Pocket Medicine (like gold in your pocket for the wards)
                                                  I just took the shelf yesterday, so I haven't gotten my grades back yet and can't comment on how useful this regimen was.

                                                  Good luck to all of you!
                                                   

                                                  kito

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                                                    While we're at it here is what I used:

                                                    Neurology: Underground Clinical Vignettes, Pretest

                                                    Medicine: MKSAP2, Qbook

                                                    Surgery: Casefiles, NMS Casebook, Qbook

                                                    OBGYN: Blueprints, Qbook

                                                    Pediatrics: Casefiles, Qbook

                                                    Psychiatry: Casefiles, Qbook


                                                    If you are a third year a few basics about books is that you should buy your books during the first half of the year, and borrow your books for the second half from your friends. Kaplan's Qbook for Step 2 is a great book to have all year because it is a reliable source for questions. Casefiles is likely the single best resource for every rotation with the possible exception of medicine. Get your hands on Casefiles for everything and use it in conjunction with Qbook for questions and you are likely to be fine all year.

                                                    Medicine is the exception because of the large body of knowledge that you need to master, so for that there is MKSAP for Students, which is really a question book whose answers read like the pages of a text book. It is the single most powerful weapon for that clerkship.

                                                    You are going to hear about people using a zillion different books and question sources including, but not limited to, Blueprints, NMS, BRS, First Aid, Appleton & Lange, Kaplan, Pretest and an array of textbooks. It is fine to explore these books and some of them may even help you, but if you can manage to do this while sticking to the Casefiles/Qbook/MKSAP mantra you are likely to be fine.
                                                     

                                                    MadameLULU

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                                                    1. Resident [Any Field]
                                                      Im trying to read the pertinent chapter in Boards and Wards before I begin each rotation. It is short enough so I can easily read it and get a grasp on the material without being overwhelmed by details (that's what Case Files, Step Up and those types of books are for DURING the rotation). Also, I figure I'll use it before I take Step 2, so I can also it to take notes.
                                                       

                                                      quideam

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                                                        here's what i used (if i remember correctly)... oh, and when i mention "blueprints", i mean the text, not the casebook...

                                                        Peds: Blueprints, Blueprints Q&A book, PreTest
                                                        OBGYN: Blueprints, Bluperints Q&A book, High Yield (high yield is AWESOME!)
                                                        Psych: First Aid Psych
                                                        Family Med: Case Files medicine (some of it), Blupeprints CASES family med
                                                        Medicine: Case Files Medicine, Blupeprints Q&A book, StepUp Medicine (this one is KEY!), MKSAP
                                                        Surgery: Case Files Surgery, Surgical Attending rounds, NMS Surgery Cases, Recall (mostly only on the wards though), PreTest Surgery, some A&L questions (just trauma and electrolytes), Blueprints Q&A

                                                        Overall, i think that for the "smaller" subjects, like peds and obgyn, blueprints and a question book is all you need. For medicine, i would strongly recommend StepUp - i thought it was thorough and comprehensive. Also, as far as questions, PreTest is good for most things (though for medicine i thought it was way too hard), but the little pocket-sized blueprints question books (available for peds, obgyn, med, and surg) are AWESOME - those questions are *just* like shelf questions, in my opinion, and they cover the right range of material, too.

                                                        Good luck with third year!! Believe me, it's over before you know it!!

                                                        Quid :)
                                                         

                                                        Counterpointer

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                                                          I don't think I've seen anyone's comments on First Aid for the Wards.
                                                          I was planning to get:
                                                          FA for Step 2 CK
                                                          FA for the Wards

                                                          Just for reading to prep for each rotation and then to see what kinds of things Step 2 will require of me. But maybe FA for the Wards is a waste of $ ??
                                                           

                                                          MonkeyRalph

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                                                          1. Attending Physician
                                                            If you get FA for step 2 CK, I wouldn't get FA for the wards. FA for the wards does have nice sections to read before you start each rotation. I would recommend one or the other. Since you'll need FA Step 2 CK eventually, maybe that would be a better choice.
                                                             

                                                            Colbert

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                                                              I thought this thread could use a bump since no one has posted in over a year and a half. I'm going to begin accumulating my third year books and I would really appreciate the input. Thanks!

                                                              Medicine:
                                                              Pediatrics:
                                                              Family Medicine:
                                                              Psychiatry:
                                                              Surgery:
                                                              Ob-Gyn:
                                                              Other:
                                                               

                                                              JonnyWise

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                                                                For what its worth from someone just finishing third year. Personally I strongly prefer an "overview" book and then to learn most of the specifics by doing questions and seeing patients on the wards.

                                                                Medicine: MKSAP 4, MGH Pocket Medicine.

                                                                -I found MKSAP 4 covered most of the big topics. MGH Pocket medicine is by far the most valuable book of all. You can quickly look things up after admitting a patient to formulate a real plan and, in general, you have all the answers in your pocket.

                                                                -Keep in mind the environment of your hospital as well. Ours is all electronic medical records so there are literally computers everywhere, ie. Uptodate available at every turn.

                                                                -I know alot of people recommend Step Up to Medicine and while I do think it is a great book (and which I do own) I also think it is completely excessive and overkill to actually read during the rotation. The book is huge so you cant really carry it around with you in the hospital. When you get home you have so many other things to do like prepare your powerpoint presentation, review the literature, and read up on your patient so you can make "real" contributions to rounds the next day, and dont forget you have to sleep so that you are energized to suck up the following day. What I am trying to say here is that it is a good reference text, but not useful in your daily use. While I know it works for some I think it is very low yield.

                                                                -Case Files Internal Medicine: i dont think this is a must have so I am not listing it at the top. It is only useful as something to get your mind thinking like an internist, especially if you are far removed from step 1 or clinical medicine in general. I only recommend it for people who are crammers and can go through all the cases the weekend before your rotation starts. It is a good overview (i want to emphasize overview as this is not detailed enough to really do anything on the wards in my humble opinion. Just knowing that you treat CAP with cef and azithro is only half the battle now. Think about how you know whether it is CAP versus HCAP. Do these drugs require renal dosing? Liver failure dosing? What general bacterial classes do they cover? Dosing? PO or IV? If both are available when do you want to use one or the other?) of all the most common things you will see, but by no means is it necessary if you have a solid foundation from the first 2 years. Otherwise I would spend time during the rotation reading about your patient specifically, preparing articles/presentations, spending time with your non-med student girlfriend so she doesnt dump you for "always studying," and doing MKSAP questions.

                                                                Pediatrics: Blueprints Pediatrics, Pretest Pediatrics

                                                                -Blueprints is an excellent overview/review book. It is quite a bit longer than the other blueprints books, but if you have the endurance I recommend reading the whole book the weekend before your rotation starts. Dont try and memorize every little detail, but just try and be exposed to the most common disease processes so when you see them on the ward your mind doesnt go blank. You will learn the litte details during your rotation. After the fifth time of writing all the admission orders for a kid with croup you will have the details memorized. (Yes, I know that for IM above I said that now you need to know the details. I dont think this applies for peds as much as for IM.)

                                                                -Pretest had some good questions. Do it at your own pace throughout the rotation.

                                                                -Case Files Peds: I did buy this book and do it the weekend before my peds rotation started. However, I dont think it made much of a difference so I only mention it for thoroughness. Do this in your spare time throughout the rotation if you want, but I really dont think you will miss anything without it.

                                                                Family Medicine: N/A

                                                                -I did not use any special books for this during my rotation. I did this almost last and found that it was 75% IM, 15% OB, and 10% Peds (depends on your preceptor). Others may have more useful information for you than me.

                                                                -I was fortunate to have rotated through IM, OB, and Peds already so nothing was completely foreign to me (though I could not remember any of the details of anything), except I will say that I think the primary difference in FM vs IM is there is alot more focus on screening guidelines, preventative guidelines, immunization schedules, etc. In other words know preventative medicine.

                                                                Psychiatry: Current Clinical Strategies (CCS) Psychiatry, CCS Handbook of Psychiatric Drugs, Pretest Psych

                                                                -These two books carried me through my entire psych rotation. They have literally everything you will need to know during your rotation and they fit into your pocket. They have DSM-IV criteria, specific clinical findings to look for during HPI, and specific drugs to treat with (including dosing!). The only glaring omission (that I noticed at least) is that there is no section on adjustment disorder and the various iterations of it. I saw alot of this during the consult/liasion portion of my rotation. Overall, though, I speak very highly of both of these books for psych.

                                                                -Pretest Psychiatry: i think this book is very useful in fine tuning the specifics of each drug class and their side effect profiles. Not so useful for much else.

                                                                -Lange QA Psych: i have seen this recommended before and bought it accordingly so I feel the need to comment on it. DONT BUY IT! I feel like this book is so basic and not designed for med students. If you had psych during the first two years and paid any attention at all then you dont need this book. Dont waste your time.

                                                                -If you must have a review book of some sort BRS Behavioral Sciences is a really good quick summary of the entire field of psych.

                                                                Surgery: Case Files Surgery, Surgical Recall

                                                                -Surgical Recall is a must have for every medical student. It is particularly useful if you have not adjusted to the surgery lifestyle and, therefore, do not study for hours each night after going home. It really does have all the major points that you will be pimped on in the OR. However, ideally you do not need this book. Once you adjust to the surgery lifestyle you need to get a case list for the next day and figure out which cases you will be on (if other med students in your group). Read about those cases and patients in detail every night. I stopped using surgical recall about 2 weeks into my rotation and only pulled it out if I was switched into an unexpected case for whatever reason. This sounds really cliche but if you read a regular textbook for your cases you will understand what is happening and be able to at least extrapolate a good answer for those off the wall questions that you get asked in the OR. Surgical recall only has you memorize details which may or may not work depending on the surgeon.

                                                                -Case Files Surgery is a good book because it teaches the basics of floor management of surgical patients. Keep in mind it is only an overview, but it is more than you will get otherwise (at least for me). It will make sure you can recognize small bowel obstruction clinically, know the most common causes of post-op fever, know why surgical SOAP notes only mention whether the patient is passing gas or not, and know why surgeons really care about C Diff (NO! Its not diarrhea. Its not because it is contagious. Its not because it smells like a**. Those are reasons a medicine doc would care about C Diff. Surgeons care because the end game of C Diff is toxic megacolon, which requires surgery!!) I realize this last statement is somewhat of an exagerration, but you get my point.

                                                                Ob-Gyn: Blueprints Ob-Gyn, Case Files Ob-Gyn

                                                                -Once again, as states above, I really like both of these books for Ob-Gyn. Read either blueprints in its entirety or due all of case files the weekend before your rotation starts. Do both if you are a super stud. They are both excellent and contain 99% of what you will need on your rotation. You will quickly realize that ob-gyn (especially OB) has a very finite amount of information to know when compared to medicine, surgery, etc.

                                                                -Pretest Ob-Gyn: i also did this book during my rotation and found it only mildly helpful. I found that it really emphasizes small details which are not very useful on the wards. Having 50 questions on the subtle differences between the 100 kinds of abortions (threatened vs missed vs MAKE IT STOP) is not useful at all in my humble opinion. Having said that I did this book anyways because I am neurotic and was able to identify the 1 shelf question which asked me to choose the type of abortion.

                                                                Other: Pretest Neurology

                                                                -If your school has a separate neurology rotation (we did) then you must do this book. The best that I came across. Also, if you need a quick review of pathways, etc then High-Yield Neuroanatomy is an excellent 1 hour review of all neuroanatomy.

                                                                -If you have time to leisurely read other medical books unrelated to your rotation then you either have absolutely no concern about sucking ass to get honors or are a super stud way beyond me. Either way: please spend any additional time you have with your girlfriend, family, or PS3 (or research if you are going for a competitive specialty).

                                                                LASTLY: The best advice I can give which applies to everyone no matter how your rotation is scheduled is to talk to the people who just did the rotation! Absolutely nothing beats knowing ahead of time what questions the surgeon tends to ask students in the OR. Or knowing how an IM attending likes to hear oral presentations so you nail it the first time around. I really, really cannot emphasize this enough. Without reading anything you can look like a stud. Remember, on rotations that you are not interested in at all the goal is to do as little studying as possible and still get the best evaluation. This is the best way to do that.


                                                                I know this is long and winded, but I thought it was time to finally try and give back a little, especially when I think back to all the neurotic questions I had when I was just starting 3rd year. Hope it helps someone out there!
                                                                 

                                                                Colbert

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                                                                  Thanks! That was way more of a comprehensive and thorough response than I could have ever expected. It definitely helped me a long way towards getting my book list together and quelling some of my fears.

                                                                  Thanks again!
                                                                   

                                                                  JonnyWise

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                                                                    You have to give power point presentations during rotations? Is that normal?

                                                                    I should clarify. Not exactly ppt presentations as you may be thinking. When we are asked to give our "5 minute talks" depending on how I gauge the attending and team I will make a powerpoint and print it out 4-6 slides/page. This just makes it a little easier to follow (not that anyone cares what I am saying). As 'toolish' as this sounds the main reason I do this is b/c I write my name really big on the first slide so the attending remembers 2 months later when he is writing my evaluation. Note: at our school there is a specific section on our evaluation form that asks the attending to rate our use of "evidence-based medicine."

                                                                    It doesnt take more than 1 hr tops to make these. Usually less. Dont sweat it. Most dont really need it either. Again, you have to gauge your attending and team.
                                                                     
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                                                                    RhythmMD

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                                                                      I'm looking into getting MKSAP for Medicine, but I honestly can't tell whether to get 2, 3, or 4 for my IM clerkship. Amazon states that 4 is supposed to supplement 2, but I also see remarks about 3 being similar to 2 aside from different questions. Does anyone have one or more of these books and is capable of commenting on the differences? Greatly appreciated...
                                                                       

                                                                      RhythmMD

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                                                                        Surgery is my 1st rotation. I already bought Recall and NMS Casbook (both coming with high reviews), but I have no idea what to get for practice questions. Appleton & Lange got pummeled on amazon for being riddled with errors and having easy questions not reflective of the shelf, and Pretest got away with only a few less scathing remarks. Are these two really the best options? The only options? Has anyone tried something different? Or want to counter the Amazon comments of these 2 texts?
                                                                         
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