Creightonite

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I thought of doing an SMP but this requires a major move for me. Instead, I can take the same anatomy and physio classes independantly at the school where I am right now. I am finishing up a Ph.D. in Immunology so having another MS degree is of no use to me. Showing that I can get all "As" in tough class that's what is important. Have anyone done this independantly? I think I can do this way less than $33k.
 

drbear

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Well, SMP programs (True SMP programs) are more then just grad classes. A tru e SMP program will have you taking classes with 1st year med students and graded on their curve. From what I've heard from most admissions committee members and advisors, getting an A in an SMP med school course means A LOT more then getting an A in a grad school course, as grad school courses can be graded differently.

Then again, if you don't want to move and spend more money, then the benefits might not be worth it to you and you may not need it.
 

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I thought of doing an SMP but this requires a major move for me. Instead, I can take the same anatomy and physio classes independantly at the school where I am right now. I am finishing up a Ph.D. in Immunology so having another MS degree is of no use to me. Showing that I can get all "As" in tough class that's what is important. Have anyone done this independantly? I think I can do this way less than $33k.

I wouldn't say that about getting another MS degree. Although a PhD in immunology is commendable, immunology isn't the only PhD degree in the world;). The MS degree you earn in an SMP is hard proof that you finished a year of med school level classes. Certainly not comparable or equal to a masters in immunology (or in your case a PhD).

As stated, an SMPs have you take the courses with the 1st year med students at their respective school. Getting all A's in classes is fine, but SMPs also include the fact that you are under the rigorous conditions of med school. How many classes will you take if you do not do an SMP? What kind of classes will you take? As much as I am a supporter of the concept that grad school classes are as hard as their med school counterparts, they are ultimately not the same. Grad school courses ultimately emphasizes the scientific method to solve problems.

I am currently a PhD candidate, and have actually done what you want to do. I've actually taken many of the 1st and 2nd year med school curriculum (incl: pathology, pharmacology, medical statistics, biochemistry, and molecular biology). In addition to these, I also took in parallel, upper division undergrad courses to boost my undergrad GPA. I have maintained a 4.0 in all of these classes (as well as my grad school requirements). Despite all that, I only took like 2-4 classes a quarter since I had to balance it out with my research obligations. In contrast, our first year med school class takes something like 5-6 classes per quarter. If i recall, their block I for fall quarter as an MSI included: anatomy, biochemistry, cell biology, doctoring, physiology, and I think they also have clinic work too. They're in class from 9-4, and on bad days (anatomy lab) they're there till 5-7. So an SMP may mimic this better than just taking classes as a PhD student or post-graduate.

I enjoy research, and this is why i am sticking with this PhD route. However if I do not get into med school post-PhD, then I will do an SMP. I see nothing wrong with doing another "masters". In all honesty, post-MD, I may still do an MS...in something that floats my boat. As professional students, going to school is a part of life, not really another "chore" IMO. Hope that helps!
 
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socal78

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I wouldn't say that about getting another MS degree. Although a PhD in immunology is commendable, immunology isn't the only PhD degree in the world;). The MS degree you earn in an SMP is hard proof that you finished a year of med school level classes. Certainly not comparable or equal to a masters in immunology (or in your case a PhD).

As stated, an SMPs have you take the courses with the 1st year med students at their respective school. Getting all A's in classes is fine, but SMPs also include the fact that you are under the rigorous conditions of med school. How many classes will you take if you do not do an SMP? What kind of classes will you take? As much as I am a supporter of the concept that grad school classes are as hard as their med school counterparts, they are ultimately not the same. Grad school courses ultimately emphasizes the scientific method to solve problems.

I am currently a PhD candidate, and have actually done what you want to do. I've actually taken many of the 1st and 2nd year med school curriculum (incl: pathology, pharmacology, medical statistics, biochemistry, and molecular biology). In addition to these, I also took in parallel, upper division undergrad courses to boost my undergrad GPA. I have maintained a 4.0 in all of these classes (as well as my grad school requirements). Despite all that, I only took like 2-4 classes a quarter since I had to balance it out with my research obligations. In contrast, our first year med school class takes something like 5-6 classes per quarter. If i recall, their block I for fall quarter as an MSI included: anatomy, biochemistry, cell biology, doctoring, physiology, and I think they also have clinic work too. They're in class from 9-4, and on bad days (anatomy lab) they're there till 5-7. So an SMP may mimic this better than just taking classes as a PhD student or post-graduate.

I enjoy research, and this is why i am sticking with this PhD route. However if I do not get into med school post-PhD, then I will do an SMP. I see nothing wrong with doing another "masters". In all honesty, post-MD, I may still do an MS...in something that floats my boat. As professional students, going to school is a part of life, not really another "chore" IMO. Hope that helps!

you should be a professor, then you can always be in school.
 

Creightonite

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Well I actually found out that my grad program has some classes that are taken alongside med students. The exams are separate though.
 
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