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Hemogoblin

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The other day, I just happened to borrow a friends set of loupes that he can't stand. He bought them and rarely ever uses them; he hates them that much. I've never used them, and quite frankly, didn't want to even try. But, seeing as he was offering, I did. All I can say is WOW! I found that there was no "getting used to them" and it felt really natural.

Now, my problem is that I don't think I could go back without them! I ended up finishing a Class II MOD amalgam and after seeing the finished product, it would almost be unfair to my patients to NOT use them. Looks like it's time to fork out some $$$ for a set. This colleague is willing to part with them; just have to agree on a price ;)

Anyone thinking about getting them: do! These aren't really the ones I would personally buy (they've got the cool looking frames, etc.) as now that I've tried them, I would look at those "Buddy Holly" styled ones. At this point, I don't really care how I look, as long as it's comfortable.

Cheers
 

TeethVader

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The other day, I just happened to borrow a friends set of loupes that he can't stand. He bought them and rarely ever uses them; he hates them that much. I've never used them, and quite frankly, didn't want to even try. But, seeing as he was offering, I did. All I can say is WOW! I found that there was no "getting used to them" and it felt really natural.

Now, my problem is that I don't think I could go back without them! I ended up finishing a Class II MOD amalgam and after seeing the finished product, it would almost be unfair to my patients to NOT use them. Looks like it's time to fork out some $$$ for a set. This colleague is willing to part with them; just have to agree on a price ;)

Anyone thinking about getting them: do! These aren't really the ones I would personally buy (they've got the cool looking frames, etc.) as now that I've tried them, I would look at those "Buddy Holly" styled ones. At this point, I don't really care how I look, as long as it's comfortable.

Cheers

I'm in the same boat as your friend, hardly ever use them and work very comfortably withouth them. In fact, the only time I used is to make sure I have no undercuts for crown preps and that's it.
 

Hemogoblin

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Ya, I think I would have put off buying any until later, if ever, but having now tried them, I can see the attraction to using them. I'll see how I go without them but I fear that I'll now need them to continue.

Cheers
 
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diagnodent

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If you don't wear loupes you are doing a disservice to your patients. You can see so much better with them and when you are dealing with margins you need to see.
 

dentalman

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Once you get comfortable working with them, you can't go back!
 

dheav005

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loupes are the way to go for almost any type of patient care. (mostly not removable or perio, but sometimes). the advantage of being able to discern detail (ex: dentin shade variation when trying to remove caries) is something you cannot appreciate until you move off of ivorine and into the real deal.
 

ufsucks

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I know exactly what you mean... Once, I actually took my loupes home to show my friend and forgot them...the next morning in clinic, I barely knew how to work on my patient without them! They are miracle workers, but at the same time, they make you overly dependant, which I am not sure is a good thing.
 

dheav005

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thats why i have two pair. i use my TTLs daily, but the flip-ups will work in a pinch and they are better than nothing!
 

BuckeyeDDS

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I know exactly what you mean... Once, I actually took my loupes home to show my friend and forgot them...the next morning in clinic, I barely knew how to work on my patient without them! They are miracle workers, but at the same time, they make you overly dependant, which I am not sure is a good thing.

My question is this...why is it bad to be dependent on them? Is it bad to so depend on sharp instruments and sharp burs that it's a struggle when you get dull ones? I look at them as sharp eyes. I think if you aren't using them, you don't know what you're missing and you should start using them. If you are, don't feel bad at all about loving them and needing them.:thumbup:
 

ufsucks

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My question is this...why is it bad to be dependent on them? Is it bad to so depend on sharp instruments and sharp burs that it's a struggle when you get dull ones? I look at them as sharp eyes. I think if you aren't using them, you don't know what you're missing and you should start using them. If you are, don't feel bad at all about loving them and needing them.:thumbup:

No, what I mean by that is that, for example, like I said in my post before, I forgot them one day and I felt lost without them. I also know someone who broke theirs in half one week and he felt like he was doing inferior work that whole week... because once you get used to them, to be without them SUCKS! So I don't feel bad for loving them, just wish I weren't so dependent on them!
 

eran76

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Everyone here has discussed the idea of becoming "dependent" on loupes which is clearly clinically important. However, I've yet to see any discussion about what the long term visual health effects on you as the dental practitioner from their daily use?

As someone with very good natural vision, should I be concerned about hastening the degradation of my visual acuity? I mean, people have been doing "good" dentistry without loupes for decades if not longer; are we to choose between sacrificing our eyes or our lower backs?

Does anyone know of any actual research on the subject?
 

Lesley

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Everyone here has discussed the idea of becoming "dependent" on loupes which is clearly clinically important. However, I've yet to see any discussion about what the long term visual health effects on you as the dental practitioner from their daily use?

As someone with very good natural vision, should I be concerned about hastening the degradation of my visual acuity? I mean, people have been doing "good" dentistry without loupes for decades if not longer; are we to choose between sacrificing our eyes or our lower backs?

Does anyone know of any actual research on the subject?

I've had loupes for a few years, and I use them, but not exclusively, especially not when giving anesthetic, extractions, impressions or seating dentures, but I'm also concerned about becoming too dependent on them. I've noticed my husband, who has used them exclusively for the past couple of years, can not work without them and wants to increase his magnification because he feels his are, now, not strong enough. He has the same magnification as me. I've been doing dentistry 25 years, not including school, and when I look at my work before loupes, it looks pretty good, no notable clinical or radiographic difference. No doubt, you can see things better with loupes, and they're especially helpful with finding difficult canals, but is it really necessary, all the time? I'm not 100% sold. In some respects, what I don't like about loupes is the limited field of vision. For me, this may sound ridiculous, but it seems my eyes can better see around corners without the loupes on. I almost feel loupes make my eyes lazy, but it's an unconfirmed suspicion. Moderation, as with everything. I recently watched a Dr. 90210, a cosmetic surgery TV show, and was surprised to see that the cosmetic surgeons, while many use a light mounted on headgear, did not use loupes. Even the dentists I observed on "Extreme Makeover" did not use loopes while inserting veneers. Interesting.
 
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1992Corolla

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I've had loupes for a few years, and I use them, but not exclusively, especially not when giving anesthetic, extractions, impressions or seating dentures, but I'm also concerned about becoming too dependent on them. I've noticed my husband, who has used them exclusively for the past couple of years, can not work without them and wants to increase his magnification because he feels his are, now, not strong enough. He has the same magnification as me. I've been doing dentistry 25 years, not including school, and when I look at my work before loupes, it looks pretty good, no notable clinical or radiographic difference. No doubt, you can see things better with loupes, and they're especially helpful with finding difficult canals, but is it really necessary, all the time? I'm not 100% sold. In some respects, what I don't like about loupes is the limited field of vision. For me, this may sound ridiculous, but it seems my eyes can better see around corners without the loupes on. I almost feel loupes make my eyes lazy, but it's an unconfirmed suspicion. Moderation, as with everything. I recently watched a Dr. 90210, a cosmetic surgery TV show, and was surprised to see that the cosmetic surgeons, while many use a light mounted on headgear, did not use loupes. Even the dentists I observed on "Extreme Makeover" did not use loopes while inserting veneers. Interesting.

Very good point of view. I have yet to buy these things...and might possibly do without...it just sucks when your row instructor grades with loupes on!
 

dheav005

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like most things in dentistry, this really seems to be a point of personal preference. i love my loupes, but i dont know that i would want to move up to the high mag, limited field telescopic style loupes. some folks use them, some never get that far. i might just get a microscope for endo and keep my trusty TTLs for everything else. loupes arent necessary to do quality dentistry, but they probably increase the number of people who are capable of doing quality work.
 

Typo

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As said above, loupes are even better when you're using them with patients, instead of just a typodont.

The biggest problem with loupes for me? You lose some depth perception because of the magnification. This makes it more likely that you'll create undercuts or poorly-angled walls or occlusal surfaces. In terms of improving ergonomics, though, loupes are amazing.
 

Lesley

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As said above, loupes are even better when you're using them with patients, instead of just a typodont.

The biggest problem with loupes for me? You lose some depth perception because of the magnification. This makes it more likely that you'll create undercuts or poorly-angled walls or occlusal surfaces. In terms of improving ergonomics, though, loupes are amazing.

Yes, I think you loose some depth perception, too. When I work without loopes and move towards or away from the patient to view a different aspect of my prep or another tooth, my eyes, without loopes, accomodate well, but with the loopes I have to, just like with a dental camera, move in or out to get in focus. A pain. There are pluses and minuses. About 15+ years ago, when I began taking some cosmetic dentistry courses, I started taking before, during and after shots. The photos of my preps looked good enlarged even without the aid of loopes. Magnification is a very nice tool though. Prepping in good light makes a world of difference to me.
 

Dr. Dai Phan

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I bought my first loupes in 1997 (year 1 of my pros. residency) and was given a pair free of charge when I taught at UT in 2001. I have never used them until as recent as couple months ago as my eyes are getting old (like me). I think that if you use them on a daily basis, you will depend on them like narcotics. I have known some students who COULD NOT work without the loupes when I was at UT. I am very curious to know if there is a hidden danger of using them on day-to-day basis. I guarantee you that none of these loupes companies would grant me to do a research on this. DP
 

DrJeff

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The biggest advantage I find with my loupes isn't with the prep portion (except of course for forcing me to use proper posture with the 20" or so focal length I've got;) ), but in the finishing of restorations, especially Class III, IV and V resins. Basic restorative, crown and bridge, oral surgery, removeable prosth, I'll freely jump back and forth between loupes on and loupes off.

Endo on the other hand, its Loupes on 100% of the time for me, they really, really make a huge difference in the hunt for the canal!
 

Lesley

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I bought my first loupes in 1997 (year 1 of my pros. residency) and was given a pair free of charge when I taught at UT in 2001. I have never used them until as recent as couple months ago as my eyes are getting old (like me). I think that if you use them on a daily basis, you will depend on them like narcotics. I have known some students who COULD NOT work without the loupes when I was at UT. I am very curious to know if there is a hidden danger of using them on day-to-day basis. I guarantee you that none of these loupes companies would grant me to do a research on this. DP


Once you hit 50 your eyes really start playing tricks. Occassionally, I've been using them to check my work after prepping and again after finishing restorations. Sort of challenging myself a bit. For me, it's a good way to keep learning and improving without creating dependency. I also do not want to use them on a constant basis, but it's nice to have them available.
 

Lesley

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The biggest advantage I find with my loupes isn't with the prep portion (except of course for forcing me to use proper posture with the 20" or so focal length I've got;) ), but in the finishing of restorations, especially Class III, IV and V resins. Basic restorative, crown and bridge, oral surgery, removeable prosth, I'll freely jump back and forth between loupes on and loupes off.

Endo on the other hand, its Loupes on 100% of the time for me, they really, really make a huge difference in the hunt for the canal!

For endo a very valuable tool, although I do not use them all the time, but very often. For class five preps, also invaluable. Sometimes composites, especially the flowable ones, have a very translucent quality and blend with the cervical gingiva. Using loupes avoids unecessary tissue abrasion while prepping and especially finishing, for those slightly and slightly more, subg Class V cavities.
 

USUaggie

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So I just broke out my shiney new pair of loupes today in the lab to do a couple crown preps (typodont) and admit it took some getting used to - mostly the fact that I had a limited range I could work with and still be in focus - anyway, I noticed that the light reflected off of the teeth a little bit differently and sort of gave off a yellowish tint. Has anyone else noticed this?
 

dheav005

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light is gonna reflect differently in a typodont than in the mouth...i suppose it also might depend on your particular typodont brand. kavo, kilgore, etc...i remember our kavo teeth were stark white through and through. besides dentin takes on all kinds of different yellows and grays. i wouldnt worry about it.
 

USUaggie

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light is gonna reflect differently in a typodont than in the mouth...i suppose it also might depend on your particular typodont brand. kavo, kilgore, etc...i remember our kavo teeth were stark white through and through. besides dentin takes on all kinds of different yellows and grays. i wouldnt worry about it.

Well, yeah, but what I mean is that I noticed a difference between looking through the loupes and looking at the same teeth without them. It's not something I'm too concerned about because it's not a stark difference, it's just noticeable on the edges where the light reflects. I just don't know why that is.
 

denturewearer

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yes I agree. when I find myself doing crown preps especially, I find myself gleaning over them. but still, I cant see why some people do away with them. i think they're doing their patient a disservice
 

Dr. Dai Phan

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yes I agree. when I find myself doing crown preps especially, I find myself gleaning over them. but still, I cant see why some people do away with them. i think they're doing their patient a disservice

Not really unless you have a medical condition that warrants the use of the loupes. Excellent dentistry had been seen in the days before loupes came to the market. I saw some amazing onlays placed 30-40 years ago from time to time. DP
 

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I simply like the fact that you can sit up straight in an ideal position and work without straining to see detailed anatomy. You can compare loupes to reading glasses, are reading glasses bad for you? No not by any means they simply let your lens relax in a given position and prevent continuous flexing of the lens. Says my optometrist anyway Once you get use to them they are great to work with. At least I have enjoyed them.
 
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