Bionista

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Hi everyone, I am a current medical school applicant and have applied to both MD and DO programs. My goal is to work in pathology, so I am curious on your thoughts for getting residency positions. Is there a difference in how you are looked at if you are a DO versus and MD? Also, how competitive would you say pathology is to get into?

Thanks for any tips or info you may have!
 

HmanPath

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Does not make a difference in Pathology.
That being said, I would go MD in case you change your mind. That way you will be in a better position for more competitive specialties should you choose one instead of path.
 
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ClinPathDO

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Hi everyone, I am a current medical school applicant and have applied to both MD and DO programs. My goal is to work in pathology, so I am curious on your thoughts for getting residency positions. Is there a difference in how you are looked at if you are a DO versus and MD? Also, how competitive would you say pathology is to get into?

Thanks for any tips or info you may have!
Try to match USMD, but you can still match a good pathology residency from DO.
 

jupiterianvibe

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You might change your mind in medical school. You probably will, actually.

I would go with the choice that gives you the most options:

MD
 

Pathbusiness

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I think the OP knows that MD vs DO. He is asking what if he has to go with DO, if it would make tough for him to land a spot in a good pathology program. Answer to that is NO.
 
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Bionista

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I think the OP knows that MD vs DO. He is asking what if he has to go with DO, if it would make tough for him to land a spot in a good pathology program. Answer to that is NO.

Yes, this is what I was wondering about. I have seen many pathologists that are DOs, but just wondering if there are more opportunities out there for MD or not.

Thank you for all of your input!
 

ClinPathDO

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Yes, this is what I was wondering about. I have seen many pathologists that are DOs, but just wondering if there are more opportunities out there for MD or not.

Thank you for all of your input!
yes the level of medical school prestige factors into residency selection.
 
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alpinebrook

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I know for a fact that some of the most competitive pathology residency programs do not accept DOs. But there are plenty of great programs that do, so it wouldn't be the end of the world. No, it's not very competitive in general. But even the less competitive specialties have particular residency programs that are very competitive.
 
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chooks

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I had a similar thought process as well at one point ("DO or MD?") Don't kid yourself -- for all the talk about DO=MD around, that is not the reality in many specialties (Pathology included when it comes to upper tier programs, as already discussed).

Cost-wise, an in-state MD school tuition is more affordable (relatively speaking) than most DO programs as well.

If you have the choice, there is very little reason to pick DO over MD (IMHO, and will probably get flamed by someone for that -- don't shoot the messenger though).
 
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yaah

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Go whatever route will allow you to distinguish yourself the most. Pedigree matters, but pedigree is always changing. The last stop on your CV is typically the most important. Quality pathologists come from every background. That being said, it is probably harder as a DO to get on the track compared to an MD background.
 
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StaphMember

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I know for a fact that some of the most competitive pathology residency programs do not accept DOs. But there are plenty of great programs that do, so it wouldn't be the end of the world. No, it's not very competitive in general. But even the less competitive specialties have particular residency programs that are very competitive.

What would you consider the most competitive Path programs? I’m a current Med student considering Pathology as a means of pursuing the Medical Microbiology subspecialty and want to be sure that my stats are appropriate for the programs I'd apply to.

Additionally (maybe outside the scope of this forum) I've seen that some programs offer the combined anatomical + clinical pathology 4 year track as well as 3 year tracks in either clinical or anatomical. Would the isolated tracks be better utilized for a particular subspecialty (I.e. AP for Forensic Pathology / CP for Medical Micro) or would the combined route make the resident a stronger applicant? It seems that combined would be more marketable, but with significantly stronger interests in lab medicine would the combined route be excessive?
 

pathslides

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What would you consider the most competitive Path programs? I’m a current Med student considering Pathology as a means of pursuing the Medical Microbiology subspecialty and want to be sure that my stats are appropriate for the programs I'd apply to.

Additionally (maybe outside the scope of this forum) I've seen that some programs offer the combined anatomical + clinical pathology 4 year track as well as 3 year tracks in either clinical or anatomical. Would the isolated tracks be better utilized for a particular subspecialty (I.e. AP for Forensic Pathology / CP for Medical Micro) or would the combined route make the resident a stronger applicant? It seems that combined would be more marketable, but with significantly stronger interests in lab medicine would the combined route be excessive?

Every track option possible is inferior to AP/CP option. It's one more year total for something that will make a huge difference if you ever want to do community /private practice. You never know what the future will hold and your career path can change, do AP/CP.
 

Autopsy101

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StaphMember - In this job market it is ill advised not to do AP/CP with a CP only subspecialty. You would be limiting yourself to very few open jobs, primarily at academic centers. AP/forensics or possibly AP/NP are the only viable tracts that I would support residents choosing - and only if they are "really sure" those are the fellowships that they want to complete. In general, it is better to apply for AP/CP - and have medicare funding for four years. If you change your mind, many options will still be open to you.

Check out the numbers on PathOutlines Job reports - it's a good way to see data on what types of jobs people are hiring for. Pathologist Jobs Report - Second Quarter 2017
 
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SpartanWolverine

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Literally zero difference for most good pathology programs. The two students going path from my DO program matched at the University of Michigan and BIDMC. If you have competitive board scores and are otherwise well qualified you will be fine.

Echoing above, however, if you're even at all vaguely interested in other specialties MD will keep more doors open.
 
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