anum

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are women more respected as physicians than in surg operating?!

there are greater number of patients who trust male surg... more,so are clinics The best option for a female doctor? :confused:
 

Law2Doc

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anum said:
are women more respected as physicians than in surg operating?!

there are greater number of patients who trust male surg... more,so are clinics The best option for a female doctor? :confused:
I doubt the patients care -- many who see surgeons acknowledge that women have careers, some are unconscious anyhow, and quite a few aren't paying the bill and take what care they are offered (VA, poor). The real issues for women in surgery are the lack of lifestyle hours (if trying to have a family), and the fact that to some extent it is more of an old boy's club specialty than some other specialties (this is changing slowly).
 

Blue Dog

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Why don't you ask this in the Surgery forum? I'm sure Kimberli Cox could answer that. ;)
 
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Church

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It partially depends on where you plan on practicing... some places are generally more "enlightened" than others. Here in the deep south, my lawyer wife occasionally has problems with older men who don't think a young woman lawyer (pretty sure you could substitute doctor there, too) could help them.

Me? I go with competence, irrespective of gender/race/etc... But then, I'm reasonably enlightened. Not fully, but reasonably.
 
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anum

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Law2Doc said:
I doubt the patients care -- many who see surgeons acknowledge that women have careers, some are unconscious anyhow, and quite a few aren't paying the bill and take what care they are offered (VA, poor). The real issues for women in surgery are the lack of lifestyle hours (if trying to have a family), and the fact that to some extent it is more of an old boy's club specialty than some other specialties (this is changing slowly).
so shd the ans to it be that women who plan on havn a family say bye bye... to a possible life as a surgeon.....or vice a versa....
 
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anum

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Church said:
It partially depends on where you plan on practicing... some places are generally more "enlightened" than others. Here in the deep south, my lawyer wife occasionally has problems with older men who don't think a young woman lawyer (pretty sure you could substitute doctor there, too) could help them.

Me? I go with competence, irrespective of gender/race/etc... But then, I'm reasonably enlightened. Not fully, but reasonably.
see you might be one of the few.....but i think it is more related to the fact that women still canot totally devote themselves to "careers" and thats the reason they have to make a choice! i mean they have to be home makers aswell if they have to they cant be full time practitioners...but they are competent...
 

Law2Doc

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anum said:
so shd the ans to it be that women who plan on havn a family say bye bye... to a possible life as a surgeon.....or vice a versa....
Nothing is impossible, but certainly there are other specialties more amenable to family. Surgery and family can be done, but probably only if you are able and willing and have the means to integrate a nanny, family member or other caregiver into your life as your child's primary overseer.
 

Wee Free Woman

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Perhaps you need to look at yourself first and ask whether YOU can manage to have a family (if that's what you are planning on having), and a surgery career at the same time. It requires committment. One of the surgeons I know suggested that its always possible to work part-time as a surgeon, but I do not know if all hospitals have that possibility. You'd have to look. Some surgeons do take some time off and have their kids and then come back to surgery. They do keep up with the discipline in the meantime. I don't know details, though, sorry. Its the sort of thing you'll probably learn more about once you're on surgery rotations.
 

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There are traditionally female friendly specialties like OB and peds. OB has a malignant lifestyle just like surgery. The real question is what do you want to do and where do you want to do it. If you enjoy what you do than the hours do not matter as much. NYC, Chicago, LA etc. you may run into a few older docs that have a prejudice re: women surgeons but most patients won't care so long as you dress the part and seem halfway competent.

As an aside.....When I was doing an EMT rotation in a hospital, several patients just assumed I was a doctor because I had a white coat, stethscope and I was Caucasian. In that particular hospital, most of the doctors in the ED (about 90%) were white, most of the nurses were African-American or Latino and the medics were a mixed rag tag lot. Patients do make assumptions but my experience (and perhaps this was because it was a big city hospital), there were a lot more stereotypes about race than gender.
 
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anum

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vtucci said:
There are traditionally female friendly specialties like OB and peds. OB has a malignant lifestyle just like surgery. The real question is what do you want to do and where do you want to do it. If you enjoy what you do than the hours do not matter as much. NYC, Chicago, LA etc. you may run into a few older docs that have a prejudice re: women surgeons but most patients won't care so long as you dress the part and seem halfway competent.

As an aside.....When I was doing an EMT rotation in a hospital, several patients just assumed I was a doctor because I had a white coat, stethscope and I was Caucasian. In that particular hospital, most of the doctors in the ED (about 90%) were white, most of the nurses were African-American or Latino and the medics were a mixed rag tag lot. Patients do make assumptions but my experience (and perhaps this was because it was a big city hospital), there were a lot more stereotypes about race than gender.
so...there is still need for a social uplift....coz i think as the population is increasing n poverty and health problems are prevailing people need to open up and overcome the barriers that are hindering paths of general welfare...racial ...or gender based these thots shd melt down for beterment atleast.
 
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