TheDBird90

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Jan 3, 2016
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I'm going to be starting an Associate's in Medical Laboratory Technology at a CC this fall. I don't have any any substantial knowledge of medicine, so maybe someone could explain this to me (not going to med school either, so I thought I'd post this here): How does pathology relate to laboratory medicine? It seems like they're always grouped into one department at universities or medical schools. One school had an option of a B.S. in CLS with a conc. in Anatomic Pathology, which sounds very interesting.
 
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May 22, 2015
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MLS here. Pathology is a department located in the laboratory typically. The Pathologist is in charge of different things, sometimes depending on the hospital but in general they review abnormal hematology/body fluid slides (like possible cancerous cells), tissue samples. One hospital I did clinicals in I got to observe a pathologist when he was dissecting a kidney that had been removed from a patient, they also received a fetus while I was there for him to examine. At this particular hospitals the pathologists also performed the BM biopsies.
 

Akewataru

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Sep 10, 2013
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Hey there. I'm a Histologist so I think I can give you pretty good idea of how lab medicine relates to pathology.

Essentially you as the lab technician/technologist are going to be the one performing or running the machine the tests and making sure that the result you get is accurate. This is where quality control and quality assurance (QC and QA you will hear this A LOT in the your studies and in the lab) comes in. Was the sample compromised or contaminated in anyway? You have to make sure the result you give to the Pathologist is correct so they can interpret those results in relation what other tests that patient has had and make their diagnosis. Have you ever heard Pathologist's are called the Doctor's Doctor? This is why.

There are basically two branches of pathology clinical and anatomic. Clinical includes Clinical Chemistry, Hematopathology, Microbiology. Transfusion Medicine or blood bank could be thrown in here, however that has its own fellowship. Anatomic or Surgical pathology includes Histopathology, Cytopathology, and Histocompatibility (if you have a transplant program in the hospital). If you decide to become a Pathologist most hospitals want you to go through a dual residency (four years) where you will eligible to be boarded in AP and CP.


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Crayola227

The Oncoming Storm
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Oct 22, 2013
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Hey there. I'm a Histologist so I think I can give you pretty good idea of how lab medicine relates to pathology.

Essentially you as the lab technician/technologist are going to be the one performing or running the machine the tests and making sure that the result you get is accurate. This is where quality control and quality assurance (QC and QA you will hear this A LOT in the your studies and in the lab) comes in. Was the sample compromised or contaminated in anyway? You have to make sure the result you give to the Pathologist is correct so they can interpret those results in relation what other tests that patient has had and make their diagnosis. Have you ever heard Pathologist's are called the Doctor's Doctor? This is why.

There are basically two branches of pathology clinical and anatomic. Clinical includes Clinical Chemistry, Hematopathology, Microbiology. Transfusion Medicine or blood bank could be thrown in here, however that has its own fellowship. Anatomic or Surgical pathology includes Histopathology, Cytopathology, and Histocompatibility (if you have a transplant program in the hospital). If you decide to become a Pathologist most hospitals want you to go through a dual residency (four years) where you will eligible to be boarded in AP and CP.


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Actually, the title of "Doctor's Doctor" most commonly goes to internists.

Just being called for consult does not make you the "Doctor's Doctor."
 

Akewataru

5+ Year Member
Sep 10, 2013
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Actually, the title of "Doctor's Doctor" most commonly goes to internists.

Just being called for consult does not make you the "Doctor's Doctor."
That's odd, I've read literature and heard Pathologists use the term.

http://www.thedoctorsdoctor.com/pathologists.html

http://www.pathologytraining.org/Career/documents/2015CareerBrochure.pdf
pdf Page 6 paragraph 3

However, after doing a Google search I see what you mean. Perhaps I need to get out of the lab more often. :)


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