Phyline

2+ Year Member
Dec 4, 2014
328
130
NYC
Status
Pre-Physical Therapy
Hi guys,

I'm in a pickle. I have a great LOR from a PT written and uploaded into PTCAS already, but I just finished another round of shadowing, and had a much more extensive opportunity to interact with the patients there. I was basically an aide. In particular, one of the patients liked me so much he offered to give me a reference, haha!

I'm thinking that feedback from an actual patient would be extremely valuable, but all my 4 PTCAS reference slots are already booked up. I can definitely send it to the non-PTCAS schools, but my top choice schools are all PTCAS. Does anybody have an idea where and how I could incorporate it?

Clarification - I'm not suggesting a patient write me a letter; the PT would add his blurb to her letter of reference.

Thanks!
 
Dec 4, 2011
41
50
Status
Physical Therapy Student
Call the schools. Some might let you print out the form (from PTCAS) and send it to them through mail. Some might not.
 
Dec 4, 2011
41
50
Status
Physical Therapy Student
Yes. If I remember correctly there should be a way you can print the form and give it to the person writing the LOR so that they can sent it to the school. I had to do that with one school that asked specifically for an employer LOR, but I had already filled up the amount I could submit to PTCAS with references from others. But, again, I would call the schools and explain your situation first...some schools may or may not accept it.
 
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Jan 8, 2014
79
38
I wouldn't go to any trouble to do this. First of all, a pt aide is "unskilled," though many aides are used inappropriately (sometimes illegally) and you might have performed things you aren't supposed to...things that the patient may write about. And if not, I don't think a patient thinking you're great is gonna carry much weight over your already "great LOR" from your other PT reference.
 
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Phyline

Phyline

2+ Year Member
Dec 4, 2014
328
130
NYC
Status
Pre-Physical Therapy
Oh I didn't even think about that. Yeah I've been a bit worried that in the second recommendation letter (I'm writing it myself) I might say things that I'm not supposed to be doing.

I have spent most of the time supervising patient exercise, but pretty clueless about legality and how HIPAA and liability play into this. What I was thinking to gain out of the patient's blurb is his opinion on whether I have potential to be a good PT that patients would actually love to go to - which is a slightly different perspective than of a supervising PT.

Am I totally giving it way too much weight? Lol.
 
Aug 3, 2015
41
15
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
Oh I didn't even think about that. Yeah I've been a bit worried that in the second recommendation letter (I'm writing it myself) I might say things that I'm not supposed to be doing.

I have spent most of the time supervising patient exercise, but pretty clueless about legality and how HIPAA and liability play into this. What I was thinking to gain out of the patient's blurb is his opinion on whether I have potential to be a good PT that patients would actually love to go to - which is a slightly different perspective than of a supervising PT.

Am I totally giving it way too much weight? Lol.
"Yeah I've been a bit worried that in the second recommendation letter (I'm writing it myself) I might say things that I'm not supposed to be doing. "

Do not write your own letter of recommendations. That's ridiculous.
 
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Phyline

Phyline

2+ Year Member
Dec 4, 2014
328
130
NYC
Status
Pre-Physical Therapy
It's extremely common and not at all ridiculous. I'm not submitting it myself and the PT is editing it.
 

starrsgirl

7+ Year Member
Oct 5, 2010
1,021
555
Status
Physical Therapist
I think it's fantastic you are writing your own letter! You are your own best advocate! Of course the recommender will read it over, edit it and put it into his/her own words. But this is very common and results in strong and personal letters. At a minimum if you aren't giving bulleted ideas and suggestions to write about, you are missing out.
 
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Bones26

7+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2011
108
90
Status
DPT / OTD
I wouldn't use a pt's letter of recommendation as part of my application. If I were part of an admissions committee I'd most likely disregard it as soon as I realized it was from a patient. In my opinion it errs on the side of being inappropriate/unprofessional. Do you think people applying for med school include LOR from patients? No way. PT school is by no means the same as med school, but seeing a LOR from a patient seems silly and a little immature. "Well he has 3 great letters from PTs, 2 from former professors and a patient who he really hit if off with!" There are other ways to convey your experiences and ability to effectively interact with patients: through your personal essay, during interviews, in LOR written by PTs who observed you interact with multiple people over a relatively long time period. At best it's a neutral component of your application.
 
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Phyline

Phyline

2+ Year Member
Dec 4, 2014
328
130
NYC
Status
Pre-Physical Therapy
I wouldn't use a pt's letter of recommendation as part of my application. If I were part of an admissions committee I'd most likely disregard it as soon as I realized it was from a patient. In my opinion it errs on the side of being inappropriate/unprofessional. Do you think people applying for med school include LOR from patients? No way. PT school is by no means the same as med school, but seeing a LOR from a patient seems silly and a little immature. "Well he has 3 great letters from PTs, 2 from former professors and a patient who he really hit if off with!" There are other ways to convey your experiences and ability to effectively interact with patients: through your personal essay, during interviews, in LOR written by PTs who observed you interact with multiple people over a relatively long time period. At best it's a neutral component of your application.
It's not a letter from a patient. It's a bunch of sentences included in a PT letter.