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PCO or NESCO

Discussion in 'Pre-Optometry' started by jc812, May 2, 2007.

  1. jc812

    jc812 Member 2+ Year Member

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    Apr 11, 2006
    The MATH thread got me thinking some more about just how much I hate calc!

    How many PCO or NESCO applicants that did not take Calc get in (or not), and what were your stats?

    Accepted?
    Age?
    Gender?
    GPA overall?
    GPA science?
    Shadow/work hours?
    OAT scores?
    anything else?

    I'm just seeing what my chances are of getting into those schools, even if calc is highly recommended.

    Any feedback is appreciated!
     
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  3. eyelectric

    eyelectric Pacific Class of 2011 2+ Year Member

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    Mar 8, 2007
    I'm actually kind of surprised that all the schools (except 2) require calculus. From what I've heard you don't really need it in optometry school (correct me if I'm wrong). Not only that, but just taking Calculus 1 is nowhere near enough calculus to be able to apply those concepts to real world applications. If the schools don't require it, even if they highly recommend it, I think your chances would still be good if the rest of your stats are good...just my 2 cents.
     
  4. rallthenamesgon

    rallthenamesgon 2+ Year Member

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    Mar 6, 2007
    I agree with his 2 cents:)
     
  5. jc812

    jc812 Member 2+ Year Member

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    Apr 11, 2006
    Thanks.. I've decided that I would broaden my Optometry School spectrum by trying to take Calc at a CC. :(
     
  6. Canadian26

    Canadian26 Member 5+ Year Member

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    Aug 18, 2005
    Im not really sure why any proffession requires basic Calc either...majority of med/dent/pharm etc. programs require it, and ive never figured out why really.
     
  7. eyelectric

    eyelectric Pacific Class of 2011 2+ Year Member

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    Mar 8, 2007
    I guess its just one of those proverbial hoops that schools like to make everyone jump through...:confused:
     
  8. daysend85

    daysend85 2+ Year Member

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    Mar 14, 2007
    Calc is frequently required to indicate whether or not you are capable of learning new and difficult material. As far as I can see, that's the only reason.
     
  9. cpw

    cpw It's a boy !!! Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Apr 25, 2001
    Tampa
    exactly, calculus knowledge provides skills in abstract thinking, problem solving, and knowledge application. Good things for docs to know! It's not really the material, it's the thought process.
     
  10. eyelectric

    eyelectric Pacific Class of 2011 2+ Year Member

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    Mar 8, 2007
    Good point...I wasn't really thinking about it from that angle. I actually use calculus in my current profession (somewhat) so I was only thinking about it in terms of applicable material. It definitely does provide a good foundation for critical thinking and problem solving.
     
  11. hfpepperbean47

    hfpepperbean47 You wish you were me 2+ Year Member

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    Apr 10, 2007
    That is what an undergraduate degree (and courses, such as calculus for the purpose of this thread) is. Its not so much about the material, its learning a thought process and being able to apply that thought process to any kind of subject material that comes your way. Which, for one, is why it doesn't matter what kind of undergraduate degree you have before going to a graduate/professional degree program. Do you need to know the basics of the subject matter that you will be studying (optometry, for example)? Yep. But its mainly the thought process that will help throughout, not prior knowledge that a person will most likely forget between undergraduate and professional school. There may be people out there who will disagree with me and argue that its nearly imperative to have a science background in order to pursue an optometry doctorate but its not. Lets not get into that argument because its been beaten to death in other threads.

    Anyway...

    I will just finish by saying the process of learning calculus is the most important (reiterating what others have said) because it is very abstract subject matter. It makes you think in different ways and that can only help. I would really suggest taking it keeping all of this in mind. I've forgotten most of my calculus (only really remember derivatives) but I still remember vividly that spark when "I got it" and that will never go away. You all know the proverbial "lightbulb" that goes off and know how good it makes you feel.
     

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