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I was wondering if R.Ph earns the same amount as a Pharm.D.?
 

jdpharmd?

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Yes, they are paid the same. :)
 
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Roxicet

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I think a pharmD is an R.pH, but an R.pH is not necessarily a pharmD. Someone with a BS in pharmacy could be an R.pH, because the R.pH designation means that they have passed the exam and are licensed to practice. (Those with a BS received their education before the pharmD degree became the sole source of a pharmacy education, but are equally competent). Someone correct me if I am wrong.
 

DaveyDoo

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so nowadays with pharmacy school so tough to get into...why wouldn't more people just get a b.s. in pharmacy, if they have the same qualifications as a pharmd...also, why would they spend all the money on going to pharmacy scchool...when in the "end", they're in the same place as a pharmd? :confused:
 

Roxicet

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There is no more BS degree for pharmacy.

from AACP:
What U.S. schools offer a B.S. of Pharmacy degree program?

In July 1992, U.S. schools and colleges of pharmacy voted to move toward awarding the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree as the only professional degree in pharmacy. The B.S. of Pharmacy program will not be offered in the U.S. to any new students in Fall 2002 or beyond. The last B.S. of Pharmacy students will graduate in spring 2004. Only the following three programs will offer the B.S. of Pharmacy (B.Pharm.) degree to new students in fall 2001 in addition to the Pharm.D. degree program.

Wayne State University College of Pharmacy
University of Montana School of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences
University of Utah College of Pharmacy

The Pharm.D. degree program requires at least 2 years of specific pre-professional (undergraduate) coursework followed by 4-academic years (or 3-calendar years) of professional study. The majority of students enter a pharmacy program with 3 or more years of college experience.
 

imperial frog

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I believe in most places the B.S. R.PHs were grandfathered in so they could continue practicing. New graduates have to be PharmD in order to sit for the boards.
 

loo

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BS pharmacists had to sit for the boards (national and state) just like PharmD's. The degree is equivalent. One degree is not better than the other.

Why don't more BS pharmacists get a PharmD? Many reasons. Why bother? It is not mandatory to do so. I personally do not feel I need the degree unless I teach, do research, or work in a specialty area. My education was very clinically focused and I felt no need to go on. This is my OPINION.

I believe that the PharmD exists mainly to limit the amount of people going into the profession and keep our profession viable and salaries high. Hear me out before you flame me. This is not to say that the PharmD is worthless degree!

It is much like the guild system of old wherein members want to protect their cottage industries and livelihoods from being destroyed (think OBRA '90, etc)

Let's look at another profession where this has happened--physical therapy. You used to be able to practice with a BS. Salaries were good. More people went into the profession. Salaries went down. Powers that be made the terminal degree MS. Still attractive to folks, salaries decrease. Powers that be make the terminal degree DPT. Too much education---not attractive. Salaries stable. Yes, this is my "simplified" version and does not take into account reimbursement for services, education, laws, etc.

Yes, I realize there is a pharmacist shortage and pharmacy does not, to some degree follow the model. I also realize that there is a hell of a lot information/technology that necessitates increasing the length of time of study. It is strictly my OPINION that it just comes down to job protection.
 

Oneday_9

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loo said:
BS pharmacists had to sit for the boards (national and state) just like PharmD's. The degree is equivalent. One degree is not better than the other.

Why don't more BS pharmacists get a PharmD? Many reasons. Why bother? It is not mandatory to do so. I personally do not feel I need the degree unless I teach, do research, or work in a specialty area. My education was very clinically focused and I felt no need to go on. This is my OPINION.

I believe that the PharmD exists mainly to limit the amount of people going into the profession and keep our profession viable and salaries high. Hear me out before you flame me. This is not to say that the PharmD is worthless degree!

It is much like the guild system of old wherein members want to protect their cottage industries and livelihoods from being destroyed (think OBRA '90, etc)

Let's look at another profession where this has happened--physical therapy. You used to be able to practice with a BS. Salaries were good. More people went into the profession. Salaries went down. Powers that be made the terminal degree MS. Still attractive to folks, salaries decrease. Powers that be make the terminal degree DPT. Too much education---not attractive. Salaries stable. Yes, this is my "simplified" version and does not take into account reimbursement for services, education, laws, etc.

Yes, I realize there is a pharmacist shortage and pharmacy does not, to some degree follow the model. I also realize that there is a hell of a lot information/technology that necessitates increasing the length of time of study. It is strictly my OPINION that it just comes down to job protection.

Change is good, and I feel that the pharmD degree right now probably contains a similar curriculum as a regular BS or non-pharmD degree. However, if it were up to me, I would make a BS a major req for pharmacy school and the PCAT contain more subject matter. As the pharmacist profession changes, applications increase, we need to make sure the candidates are qualified with life experience, four years of solid education, and overall create a similiar model as medical school app's. Although, I am sure job protection and higher salaries maybe an outcome of the transition to a Doctor of Pharmacy, it's good to have a solid, intense system. However, as someone said before, pharmD is good for research or clinical or some other job function.

Anyways, an interesting discussion nonetheless. Just my opinions.
 

loo

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Oneday_9 said:
As the pharmacist profession changes, applications increase, we need to make sure the candidates are qualified with life experience, four years of solid education, and overall create a similiar model as medical school app's.
I don't mean to hijack the thread, but I would be very interested to know what you would do?
 

jdpharmd?

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loo said:
I don't mean to hijack the thread, but I would be very interested to know what you would do?
4 years of undergrad + 4 years of pharmacy school. I think that's all he means.
 

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Some jobs require a Pharm.D., so it would not quite be accurate to say that the two degrees are equivalent. Many with Bachelor's degrees have gone back for the Pharm.D. to open up new career paths.
 
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