Physical appearance

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Monkey.King

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So I looked at a recent thread about physical appearance and chance of being accepted. And of course, the idea of being confident and well groomed is brought up. But what about things that you can't control? Like birth defects? Would patients be comfortable with a doctor with 12 fingers, or limb defects? Just wondering

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So I looked at a recent thread about physical appearance and chance of being accepted. And of course, the idea of being confident and well groomed is brought up. But what about things that you can't control? Like birth defects? Would patients be comfortable with a doctor with 12 fingers, or limb defects? Just wondering
Is this some kind of a troll post? As long as your condition does not interfere with your ability to do your job as a medical student/physician, it shouldn't be a concern by the admission committee.
 
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Long ago, when I was a technician at Sloan-Kettering, there was a peds nephologist there who had a tiny withered ar,m

How tiny?

Like a T. rex forearm.

I knew another peds oncologist who had a grand mal stutter. Didn't stop him.

Doctors who look like patients are appreciated by patients.


So I looked at a recent thread about physical appearance and chance of being accepted. And of course, the idea of being confident and well groomed is brought up. But what about things that you can't control? Like birth defects? Would patients be comfortable with a doctor with 12 fingers, or limb defects? Just wondering
 
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So I looked at a recent thread about physical appearance and chance of being accepted. And of course, the idea of being confident and well groomed is brought up. But what about things that you can't control? Like birth defects? Would patients be comfortable with a doctor with 12 fingers, or limb defects? Just wondering

If you take two candidates with the exact same stats and ECs, and one of them is average looking and one of them is a runner up on America's Next Top Model, people subconsciously think that the hotter one is the better candidate.

That being said, this scenario is unrealistic, for no two candidates are exactly the same.

ADCOMS judge prospective students based on a variety of qualities, not (just) how good you look in suit. Suffering from a medical disorder or having a birth defect is not going to harm your application. If anything, if you write your PS correctly, it can be all the more of a reason to let you in.

Cliche... but don't worry about what what you look like. Do the best with what you have: groom yourself and have good fitting, modern clothing for interviews. Anyone looks good when s/he is dressed up, snazzy, and looking and feeling confident. How you'll look on the outside much depends on how you feel about yourself on the inside. You'll be okay!
 
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Cute guys that are premed are always a plus ;)
 
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If you take two candidates with the exact same stats and ECs, and one of them is average looking and one of them is a runner up on America's Next Top Model, people subconsciously think that the hotter one is the better candidate.

That being said, this scenario is unrealistic, for no two candidates are exactly the same.

ADCOMS judge prospective students based on a variety of qualities, not (just) how good you look in suit. Suffering from a medical disorder or having a birth defect is not going to harm your application. If anything, if you write your PS correctly, it can be all the more of a reason to let you in.

Cliche... but don't worry about what what you look like. Do the best with what you have: groom yourself and have good fitting, modern clothing for interviews. Anyone looks good when s/he is dressed up, snazzy, and looking and feeling confident. How you'll look on the outside much depends on how you feel about yourself on the inside. You'll be okay!
Thanks for the information. This question wasn't really about myself, it's just that the recent thread about ohaycial appearance on this forum made me think about that.
Is this some kind of a troll post? As long as your condition does not interfere with your ability to do your job as a medical student/physician, it shouldn't be a concern by the admission committee.
*sigh* You clearly have spent too much time on SDN to separate troll posts from genuine ones. I think it's time for you to take a break.

http://forums.studentdoctor.net/thr...nce-your-chances-of-getting-accepted.1205823/
I was searching for a post by you questioning if this was a troll post, but couldn't find one. Hmm. Maybe I should've put "[Serious]" in the title as well?
 
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This may be an aside, but I was wondering how adcoms view visible tattoos? I've been planning to get something on my R arm for a while, and I was worried it would give unfavorable impressions. Am I just worrying about nothing?
 
Just don't be slovenly and foul-smelling.

If you're worried about some congenital abnormality, don't worry about it because you can probably write an awesome personal statement about overcoming challenges and get accepted instead of some lantern-jawed hunk.
 
Long ago, when I was a technician at Sloan-Kettering, there was a peds nephologist there who had a tiny withered ar,m

How tiny?

Like a T. rex forearm.

I knew another peds oncologist who had a grand mal stutter. Didn't stop him.

Doctors who look like patients are appreciated by patients.

What is a grand mal stutter?
 
I think I read the phrase in Tom Wolfe's book The Right Stuff. Astronaut John Glenn's wife Annie had a very severe stutter.

What is a grand mal stutter?

One that is severe. In French, literally a great illness, which doesn't seem as apropos as when it's applied to seizures, which is the usual context in English.
 
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This may be an aside, but I was wondering how adcoms view visible tattoos? I've been planning to get something on my R arm for a while, and I was worried it would give unfavorable impressions. Am I just worrying about nothing?

You'll be wearing a suit for your medical school interviews (hopefully!) so this should be a non-issue.
 
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This may be an aside, but I was wondering how adcoms view visible tattoos? I've been planning to get something on my R arm for a while, and I was worried it would give unfavorable impressions. Am I just worrying about nothing?
If you Search "tattoo" and click search titles only, you'll see many threads on the issue that you can peruse, with a wide variety of opinions expressed. I just wanted to bring to your attention this one in particular by a successful nontrad, thoroughly-tattooed current med student: https://forums.studentdoctor.net/th...-tattooed-non-trad-accepted-applicant.989617/

"My entire back is canvassed. As far as my arms, I only have one small area on the dorsal medial aspect of my right arm (triceps, medial biceps) that I've yet to tattoo. I also intend to fill in the small spaces between the arm tattoos with Celtic knot work on the left and perhaps on the right so that no skin is exposed (i.e., full sleeves). I also have tattoos on my chest and legs, but far less than my upper torso. I would post a great anonymous pic, but am restricted to size on the forum. I only have the pic on my fb, so I can't link it either. I'm only answering your question here because I don't intend to go shirtless during the chat. LoL I'll see if I can merge that pic into the YouTube video, though. "
 
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