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Windpt21

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Been practicing as a PT for 5 years, graduated with DPT in 2012, worked in skilled care, acute care, outpatient ortho and home health. At this point in my career I'm not truly happy and the autonomy and respect I thought I would have as a PT was a pipe dream. No patient's use direct access, few patient's respect and understand my knowledge and truly at times I just feel like I'm telling people to exercise and they aren't even doing that! I don't even have the power to order DME!

My question is between advancing my career as a PA or MD/DO, but am concerned PA would be a lateral movement rather than forward like med school.
 
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Azimuthal

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If it’s what you truly desire, either choices are rewarding. There are a few PT to MD’s on this site who will hopefully chime in.
 

starrsgirl

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Been practicing as a PT for 5 years, graduated with DPT in 2012, worked in skilled care, acute care, outpatient ortho and home health. At this point in my career I'm not truly happy and the autonomy and respect I thought I would have as a PT was a pipe dream. No patient's use direct access, few patient's respect and understand my knowledge and truly at times I just feel like I'm telling people to exercise and they aren't even doing that! I don't even have the power to order DME!

My question is between advancing my career as a PA or MD/DO, but am concerned PA would be a lateral movement rather than forward like med school.
I understand your frustration! I've felt the same since leaving school...it's definitely a shock to move from school/school affiliated clinicals to then the "real world". It is with complete respect to my PTA co worker when I say I'm literally doing the exact same job as him. I admit I do get paid much better, but I freely admit that my current job doesn't take a doctorate to do. And yes, I'm not seeing direct access, I have no power to say if a worker or athlete can or can't return to physical labor or sport, I have to practically give a presentation to a primary care provider to justify DME...
 
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jesspt

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Been practicing as a PT for 5 years, graduated with DPT in 2012, worked in skilled care, acute care, outpatient ortho and home health. At this point in my career I'm not truly happy and the autonomy and respect I thought I would have as a PT was a pipe dream. No patient's use direct access, I don't even have the power to order DME!

My question is between advancing my career as a PA or MD/DO, but am concerned PA would be a lateral movement rather than forward like med school.

I'll bring a different point of view - what have you done to change the issues you have with your current situation? I've been a PT longer than you, and I don't seem to have any of these problems.

I'm as autonomous as I want to be, meaning that around 10% of my patients come to me via direct access, and no outside providers are trying to determine the plan of care that I implement.

And, I don't understand this quote:
"... few patient's respect and understand my knowledge and truly at times I just feel like I'm telling people to exercise and they aren't even doing that!
If you're providing value to your patients, I don't know how in the world they would not have some insight into the knowledge you possess, and why they wouldn't respect it. Now, if you're not providing value...
Regardless, this sounds like a "you" problem, and not one that's inherent to the profession.

I was starting to feel some burn out around year 5, just like you. I addressed the issues that were within my control, and have been much happier (and more engaged) as a result.
 
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truthseeker

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If you give the referring providers reason to trust your opinion enough, they will stop requiring the dissertation. Build the relationships and demonstrate good knowledge and sound judgment and you will get more autonomy within the system. People don't just hand you autonomy and trust. we all know very smart people who are not very good PTs (MDs, Dentists, podiatrists, lawyers etc . . .)

Sounds like every job ever IMO.
 

NewTestament

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There's so much you could do to improve your situation. Transitioning to MD or PA would be a huge mistake. Have you tried to develop relationships with the surgeons/referring physicians? Have you learned new skills? Have you considered your own practice? Have you tried other niches in the health-care industry? There is so much potential as a health-care provider. Please reconsider.
 
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