drlove4

7+ Year Member
Sep 14, 2009
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I really don't know how to plan my life right now and am hoping for some advice. I was very depressed to get my mcat back and to see a score of 22 8/7/7 when my average was a 28. To make things worse I work a 50+ hour job and don't think I could squeeze a successful retake this cycle. I have already sent primaries out to ACOM, SOMA, KYCOM and VCOM, should I bother to return the secondaries? I'm desperate to get into any school this cycle as I have a baby girl to care for and don't want another year of limbo. My s/cGPA 3.4 (but erratic, my gen chem/bio gpa is 3.9 but C's in orgo and a couple gen ed's) and I have great ECs (research, clinical, leadership). my main questions are:
Is the mcat just too low or should I send secondaries anyway?
Should I pursue an SMP/masters program? If so, which smp would best help me get into a DO program?
 

Awesome Sauceome

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Your MCAT is the problem, you basically said it yourself... Why would you need to take more classes? The only benefit of an SMP or masters is that it would maybe give you some more time to study for the MCAT (if its an easy program). I work full time as well so I understand the challenge that one has to undertake with this stuff. Its like if you get a bad score on a test its like, whatever. But if you get a "bad score" at work then your family does not eat... I feel you.

Overall I would say to try and cram for a retake now ONLY if you know without a shadow of a doubt that the score was a fluke. Maybe you were sick when you took the test? Or you did not get good sleep, or were stressed, or anything at all? If there is some overwhelming reason that you think you could have done better any other day of that week then I would say try and cram and retake it. Otherwise, put it off, you will save yourself a lot of money and heartache.

It does not hurt to return secondaries however IF you have the money laying around. There have been people to get in with your scores, its possible, but its not a super high chance and you will likely not have too much choice in where you end up (its not like schools are fighting for those scores). But again, its not outside of the realm of possibilities. If returning your secondaries and going on some interviews will result in you not being able to afford studying and retaking the MCAT and applying again next cycle then absolutely just stop where you are at and do not throw any more money into this cycle.

Your main goal should obviously be finding a way to maximize your free time for studying for the MCAT. If that means cutting/restructuring hours at work then do that. If it means doing an SMP or masters, then that works too. Just whatever will give you the most time to devote to the test is likely your best bet.

What materials did you use to study? How long did you study? How many hours a week? You said your average was a 28; how many practice tests were they (and were they AAMC tests?)
 

baxt1412

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Oct 29, 2012
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and what was the breakdown for your average practices? (average physical science, average biological science, average verbal reasoning).

what i am getting at, is if you were averaging 9s or 10s on everything, and then you got a 7 or 8 on everything on the real test, it could jsut be nerves that causes you to do equally as bad.
 

yanks26dmb

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Nov 7, 2008
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I really don't know how to plan my life right now and am hoping for some advice. I was very depressed to get my mcat back and to see a score of 22 8/7/7 when my average was a 28. To make things worse I work a 50+ hour job and don't think I could squeeze a successful retake this cycle. I have already sent primaries out to ACOM, SOMA, KYCOM and VCOM, should I bother to return the secondaries? I'm desperate to get into any school this cycle as I have a baby girl to care for and don't want another year of limbo. My s/cGPA 3.4 (but erratic, my gen chem/bio gpa is 3.9 but C's in orgo and a couple gen ed's) and I have great ECs (research, clinical, leadership). my main questions are:
Is the mcat just too low or should I send secondaries anyway?
Should I pursue an SMP/masters program? If so, which smp would best help me get into a DO program?
Definitely don't bother applying with a 22...there's no way you get accepted.

You need to find time to study/re-take the MCAT or wait until next year. Those are your only options at the moment.
 

OsteopathicHopeful

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Sep 19, 2014
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Definitely don't bother applying with a 22...there's no way you get accepted.

You need to find time to study/re-take the MCAT or wait until next year. Those are your only options at the moment.
Dude you don't know what your talking about...sorry to come off as an ass....but people do get in to DO schools with a 22 its just harder. You make it sound like its impossible
 
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yanks26dmb

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Nov 7, 2008
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Dude you don't know what your talking about...sorry to come off as an ass....but people do get in to DO schools with a 22 its just harder. You make it sound like its impossible

And some people get in to harvard with a 26.

I wouldn't consider a shot in the dark worth the amount of money required to have said shot.....op would have to apply to nearly every school to have an extremely remote shot...and money doesn't sound like something he's rolling in right now..

So yeah...1200 or so bucks for an extremely remote chance. Not a bet I'd make.

Would be curious for @Goro to weigh in...
 
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OsteopathicHopeful

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Well I guess @Goro response will shed some light. I don't feel like it is a shot in the dark. I do agree that someone with a 22 has a slim chance, but there were 6 people in the underdogs thread last year with 22's and all of them got accepted somewhere
@yanks26dmb

I also see your point that if money is an issue sending secondaries might be a waste of money....it all depends on OP's opinion really. Are they willing to lose some money on secondaries??
 
OP
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drlove4

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Sep 14, 2009
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I really appreciate your responses. Time is tighter than money (work is inflexible), let's assume money this cycle wouldn't be a problem if it meant I had a say 50% of getting in somewhere. Am I looking at even bleaker odds?
 

Goro

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The schools will appreciate the donation; please save your money and apply next year after retaking the MCAT. I surmise that you have some test-taking anxiety or time- mgt issues. Low MCAT scores are risk factors for failing out of med school, or failing Boards.

Your GPA is not the problem, so a SMP or post-bac would be a waste of time and money.

Key thing now: fix the test-taking deficits.

I am also NOT keen on the logic of "someone got in with a XX score'. Some people win the Lotto too, but that doesn't mean we should all run out and buy Lotto tickets.

I really don't know how to plan my life right now and am hoping for some advice. I was very depressed to get my mcat back and to see a score of 22 8/7/7 when my average was a 28. To make things worse I work a 50+ hour job and don't think I could squeeze a successful retake this cycle. I have already sent primaries out to ACOM, SOMA, KYCOM and VCOM, should I bother to return the secondaries? I'm desperate to get into any school this cycle as I have a baby girl to care for and don't want another year of limbo. My s/cGPA 3.4 (but erratic, my gen chem/bio gpa is 3.9 but C's in orgo and a couple gen ed's) and I have great ECs (research, clinical, leadership). my main questions are:
Is the mcat just too low or should I send secondaries anyway?
Should I pursue an SMP/masters program? If so, which smp would best help me get into a DO program?
 
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yanks26dmb

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I really appreciate your responses. Time is tighter than money (work is inflexible), let's assume money this cycle wouldn't be a problem if it meant I had a say 40% of getting in somewhere. Am I looking at even bleaker odds?

I've got a 30 with a higher gpa and great ecs and I've got more rejections than ii's. It's tough out there man...
 
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