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PM&R attrition

Discussion in 'PM&R' started by medicineman1, Apr 12, 2007.

  1. medicineman1

    medicineman1 7+ Year Member

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    Sep 8, 2006
    You hear folks from various specialties having switched fields most commonly from primary care (FP & IM) to anesthesia, PM&R, ER, etc. Wondering what the attrition rate of PM&R residents is, and what specialties he/she transferred to? Anyone have any stories? The inpatient rehab portion of the curriculum drive anyone away from the field for example?
     
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  3. delicatefade

    delicatefade ASA Member 10+ Year Member

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    Jun 13, 2004
    Not to threadjack here :) but I have a question for you guys. What exactly is it about inpt rehab that many PM&R docs dislike so much????
     
  4. Jumpu

    Jumpu Tiger Mom/Physiatrist 10+ Year Member

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    May 6, 2002
    Chicago
    Take with a grain of salt, this is third hand info, but I have heard of a PGY-2 PM&R resident transferring to radiology. I think it's just a simple case of different strokes for different folks.
     
  5. mdvol

    mdvol Private Practice 10+ Year Member

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    Jun 6, 2003
    Greensboro, NC
    I've heard of a couple of PGY-2's that went to psychiatry but it was several years ago.
     
  6. lobelsteve

    lobelsteve SDN Lifetime Donor Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

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    WHen I was at EVMS we had several residents leave.
    My PGY2 year, there was 3 of us to start and a guy we'll call Trent (because that's his name) left for UTenn IM after 2 months. In my PGY3 year, we had 2 docs in the class and they both left- one went into FP and the other went to another PMR program.
    When I was a chief (PGY4) (and that was based on attrition obviously), we were able to keep all 5 of the PGY2's.
     
  7. lobelsteve

    lobelsteve SDN Lifetime Donor Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    11,737
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    Canton GA
    WHen I was at EVMS we had several residents leave.
    My PGY2 year, there was 3 of us to start and a guy we'll call Trent (because that's his name) left for UTenn IM after 2 months. In my PGY3 year, we had 2 docs in the class and they both left- one went into FP and the other went to another PMR program.
    When I was a chief (PGY4) (and that was based on attrition obviously), we were able to keep all 5 of the PGY2's.
     
  8. buddy 2004

    buddy 2004 New Member 10+ Year Member

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    Dec 2, 2004
    I don't think it is the inpatient that is driving people away - as IM or FP you would probably get better inpatient training, so some people might just decide to leave PMR for adequate training instead of the inferior rehab medicine inpatient experience we get now.
     
  9. fozzy40

    fozzy40 Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Jul 7, 2001
    Portland, OR
    Any statistics on the attrition rate?
     
  10. mehul_25

    mehul_25 Dude!!! 10+ Year Member

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    Washington DC
    As a PGY-II, we had 2/4 leave, one for neuro, the other for IM, as a PGY-III, 1/4 of our PGY-IIs left; for FP.

    Lots of factors played into the situation, program director, training, etc.
     
  11. lucyz02

    lucyz02 Junior Member 7+ Year Member

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    Sep 1, 2005
    personal opinion on attrition---
    I think "attrition" occurs in all specialties, mostly voluntary in PMR. Were as other specialties may have attrition in an unvoluntry manner (sugery comes to mind). In PMR sometimes people leave for various reasons, the specialty didn't meet their expectations, program unsatisfactory as it appears PD as a common culprit (as noticed as a common theme from some programs mentioned above- EVMS and GW). I wouldn't infer much about attrition, could be that people simply would find themselves happeir doing something else as could occur in any other named specialty.
     

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