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practicing in florida

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mullerian

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How realistic is it (financially) to be practicing OB in florida? I'm a 3rd year student who is interested in returning to florida after med school, and I've heard that malpractice alone in florida is like $250K. :eek: All the residents I've worked with on my rotation have basically told me that if I want to return to florida, OB is not the way to go. This has been really disturbing. Any thoughts or experiences with fl?
 

goldenjims

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Definitely a hard place to have a private practice OB unless you can work at a med school and get them to foot the malpractice bill. Most OBGYNs in Florida, esp South Florida, have no insurance. In fact, I havent run into one who still does OB that carried insurance. There are many docs that are either moving to other states or stopping OB altogether. It's pretty risky if you ask me. I went to medical school at Nova, am doing a rotating internship at Palmetto General in Miami, and applying to OB programs back in TN, SC, NC, and others. I am applying to Jackson as well. Im sure you must have family here since you said you were from this area. That makes a differenceif you ask me. All of my and my wife's family are back in SC and TN. More than likely, we will move out of Florida back to one of those areas. Good Luck to you. You'll do great wherever you are.
 

sunnygyn

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Please don't let people discourage you from going into OB/Gyn if you want to practice in Florida. It is true that most OBs (if not all) who are practicing in South Florida do so without insurance, but they are very happy and still have very busy and lucrative practices. I would encourage you to speak with some private physicians in the area to get an idea of what their day is like, and how the insurance disaster in S. Florida has affected their practices.
 

mullerian

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Most OBGYNs in Florida, esp South Florida, have no insurance. In fact, I havent run into one who still does OB that carried insurance.

So what happens if these docs get sued and lose a lawsuit? They just foot the whole bill, even if it's millions?
 

chocchip

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One of the chief residents from last year went back to FL and joined a private practice. She said that her malpractice was paid for and she was joining a practice of 4 other doctors...
 
O

OBfan

One of the chief residents from last year went back to FL and joined a private practice. She said that her malpractice was paid for and she was joining a practice of 4 other doctors...


what is the law in regards to not carry malpractice insurance. I always assumed that it was mandatory for a physician to carry insurance. I didnt know that they could just decide if they didnt want to carry the insurance they didnt have to.

Thanks
 

drlexygoat

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Florida docs have the option to go bare. Under Florida law, physicians without malpractice coverage have to post a sign in their offices informing patients they have assets to cover at least $250,000 of any malpractice award. To protect their homes, docs put their houses and large person assets in their spouse's name, since Fl bankruptcy law protects that. Docs simply choose to go bankrupt if they have a large claim against them.
 

starayamoskva

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Florida docs have the option to go bare. Under Florida law, physicians without malpractice coverage have to post a sign in their offices informing patients they have assets to cover at least $250,000 of any malpractice award. To protect their homes, docs put their houses and large person assets in their spouse's name, since Fl bankruptcy law protects that. Docs simply choose to go bankrupt if they have a large claim against them.


Actually Florida law protects the home so it is unnecessary to put it in the spouses name. If you desire to put your other assets into the spouses name for "protection" you must do so long before you are being sued.
 

DashEFX

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I'm neither a resident or practicing physician. However, I know quite a few practicing in FL. Yes the majority of them go "bare" ie without insurance. The older ones have escrow accts set up with 250-500k that would go towards expenses/lawsuit. ALL of them do require their patients to sign a form that informs them they don't have malpractice insurance and the patient must agree to go to arbitration/mediation before going to a fullfledge lawsuit should they have a complaint. They seem to practice without any problems. Most lawsuits unfortunately do come about simply because the physician is too arrogant to admit a mistake was made or there is a lack of communication between the patient and the physician regardless of who was in the "wrong". The lack of communication seems to be the biggest culprit by far.
 
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