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Practicing in the EU?

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kinakomochi

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Hi,
I am currently a medical student in the US but would really like to practice outside of the US in the future. I understand that for the most part, there will be a language barrier no matter where I go. So I am fully prepared/willing to learn a new language.
However, I was wondering if anyone has any advice in regards to which country/countries are generally more accepting of US trained physicians?
Also, if not as a practicing physician, are there any other opportunities for work with an MD?
(I am interested in Western/Central Europe.)
Thank you!
 

Osteoth

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Not an expert but I can imagine it really depends on the specialty and the need in another country.

If you're in a specialty that requires a good amount of counseling you probably would have a hard time finding a job simply because you can't communicate with the patients in their native tongue.

If you're a subspecialist or a proceduralist you might have a better chance.

Just my two cents.
 

DrLuca

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I think the UK will be the best place for you because of the language.

Even though this is subjective, generally speaking you have a chance to work in the best country in the world for an MD, the US. Why go somewhere else? Going to a different country it's very likely you will earn less and will not have the comfort you have in the US, but again, I might be wrong since I don't know your current situation or what your preferences are. Before you decide, I recommend gathering as much information as you can.

I graduated from a country in South America but I'm currently living in Italy. Most doctors I've met are dissatisfied about working here (low salary, no comfort, corruption, etc). Not all of them of course, my uncle is a FM doctor and he does well but it took him years of really hard work to get there, and even so, he earns less than the average FM doctor in the US.

It's much better in the US, for me at least. Good luck!
 
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Raryn

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Hi,
I am currently a medical student in the US but would really like to practice outside of the US in the future. I understand that for the most part, there will be a language barrier no matter where I go. So I am fully prepared/willing to learn a new language.
However, I was wondering if anyone has any advice in regards to which country/countries are generally more accepting of US trained physicians?
Also, if not as a practicing physician, are there any other opportunities for work with an MD?
(I am interested in Western/Central Europe.)
Thank you!
The problem isn't the medical degree. Every country on the planet that I'm aware of will recognize a US MD (though a DO is a LOT more iffy, being recognized by ~1/4 of countries).

The problem is residency training. Some countries (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, a variety of the Arab countries) will license a US-trained MD to practice with minimal trouble (maybe a single exam or a few months under supervision of a local, but not a full residency). The UK often falls in this group, but the rules vary from specialty to specialty (they recognize some US boards as exempting you from their tests but not all of them).

Tons of other countries will require multiple sets of exams or repeating years of (if not a full) residency. Plus language competency requirements. The EU has 28 countries (for now) with 28 sets of laws, so you really would have to start looking up specifics.
 

Durty-Trixxx

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The problem isn't the medical degree. Every country on the planet that I'm aware of will recognize a US MD (though a DO is a LOT more iffy, being recognized by ~1/4 of countries).

I've heard stories about DO students attempting to setup elective rotations in western European countries. They usually get a response like -- "Please do not come here. We view osteopathy on the same level as Scientology and witch doctoring".
 

Raryn

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I've heard stories about DO students attempting to setup elective rotations in western European countries. They usually get a response like -- "Please do not come here. We view osteopathy on the same level as Scientology and witch doctoring".
The problem is that in most other countries, osteopathy (if it exists) is a separate profession entirely, much like chiropractic, where they do ONLY OMM.
 
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