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Pre-med requirements expiration date

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by HawaiiHereICome, Mar 7, 2007.

  1. HawaiiHereICome

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    If I get a masters and work for say 1 year, when I apply to medical school will they still accept the G.chem I took way back as a freshmen. That is would they accept G.chem that I took approx 6 years prior to application?

    I've already looked on a few schools' websites and they only have "expiration dates" for the MCAT
     
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  3. mikeinsd

    mikeinsd predictably unpredictable

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    you sure do have lots of questions!

    anyhow as far as i know a grade is a grade, and it will always be as such... think about the nontrads who have to apply with a 3.0 undergrad but a 4.0 post bac... dont they wish that grades expired!
     
  4. HawaiiHereICome

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    Lol I have a lot of options, and i'm just trying to weight them carefully.

    The reason I'm asking this question is because if the MCAT can "expire" why can't classes?

    Some schools I've seen say that only MCAT's taken within the last 3 years may be used in application. Along the same reasoning, can only prereqs taken within the last 3 years be used for application?

    hmmmm....

    Oh, And I don't want them to expire if that's what you're thinking, i've done well in my prereqs so I don't want to take them again, though it probably would be easy at this point
     
  5. mikeinsd

    mikeinsd predictably unpredictable

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    no no... i didnt think you wanted them to drop, my point was that they certainly dont, and allthough i have never read this, I merely assume it is true because there are many people on this forum who are a number of years removed from their undergraduate study who still suffer some because of the lower grades they received way back when... so yes, your classes/grades will follow you, whereever it is you go, i suppose
     
  6. remo

    remo Senior Member

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    I took gchem and physics way back in 1988-1990 and was accepted to multiple places this year without taking that stuff again. I did do a recent post-bacc with a lot of bio and ochem. No schools ever asked about the old classes. They just want to see recent coursework and a good MCAT. There might be a few schools where courses "expire" but I have never heard of any.
     
  7. NN11

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    I second remo's answer. you just need to do a few post-bac classes in the future to prove that you could still get As and that you've maintained your academic ability.
     
  8. HawaiiHereICome

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    So I'd have to enter a post-bac program if I got a masters first? If not, what constitutes a post-bac class? Any class related to Bio or Chem or Physics. Is 5-6 years too old for a class to be used independently without post-bac supplementation?
     
  9. johnnydrama

    johnnydrama I'm no Superman

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    The only thing that expires is your MCAT. I think schools assume that if you still have enough prereq knowledge to score well on that, you still remember enough of the material. Usually the expiration date for MCAT scores is 3-4 years.
     
  10. Tired Pigeon

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    Drama is right. Your old grades won't 'expire', so don't worry about it.
     
  11. HawaiiHereICome

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    This is what I'm hoping. I mean seriously, if you've taken upper division/graduate level courses in the sciences and have done well on the MCAT they should ignore how long ago "intro to bio" was.
     
  12. NN11

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    HawaiiHereICome, a post-bac class is typically any class you take after you get your bachelor's degree. These can be classes you've taken before (i.e. you're repeating for a better grade) or they can be classes that you haven't taken before (i.e. you want to show that you've maintained your academic ability and competitiveness).

    If you're getting a Master's degree in the sciences, your grades in graduate level courses will speak to your academic ability (hopefully you'll get ALL As). I would say you probably don't need to take undergraduate level courses, if you've taken graduate level ones immediately prior to applying. However, keep in mind that grades from graduate level courses are often inflated. To solve this problem, you need to get a strong letter of rec. from one of your graduate professors attesting to your academic ability in detail.

    So you probably won't have to enter a formal post-bac program.

    Now, getting 14's on the science sections of your MCAT will provide pretty good evidence of your knowledge level.

    If you're going to wait 5-6 years after getting your master's, I would recommend that you take a few classes (~3) and ace them to demonstrate that you can still get As. If it has been 5-6 years since you've taken a science class and you get 14's on the Biological and Physical science sections, I don't think you need to prove anything.

    Sometimes, they just want recent coursework. Meaning it can be undergrad or grad coursework.


    By the way, awhile back I was wondering about the same questions you asked in your posts. What I shared with you above, are the answers I learned as I went through the application process. Not a single school I interviewed at asked me for more recent coursework. In fact, when I mentioned at one interview that I was taking a molecular bio course, the interviewer stopped me and said "you don't need to tell me anything extra, you're more than qualified."


    :)
     

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