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Pre-reqs @ Community College?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by isupsych253, Aug 19, 2011.

  1. isupsych253

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    I'll graduate in December with a bachelor' degree, but need to take lot of the pre-reqs for med school. In an effort to come home and work/take the classes, would it be a bad idea to take the courses at a community college?
     
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  3. Morsetlis

    Morsetlis I wish I were a dentist
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    This is an often-asked question.

    Put yourself in the adcom's shoes.
     
  4. Drogo

    Drogo hakuna matata
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    I would avoid it, a couple courses might not hurt but I'd take the majority at a 4 year institution. Why not just cover all your bases? It might be more of a pain, but it could save some potential headache later down the road.
     
  5. ISUBird100

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    For me, I didn't decide on the medical route until my junior year. I, too, was a psych major (at a different ISU ;) ). Anyways, I took Chem II the Summer after my junior year, and Orgo II this Summer (both at CC...my mom works at one so I saved a little money).

    I understand the fact that university classes are considered to be more rigorous, but I also understand the concept of student loans. I could have stayed an extra year to take all the pre reqs and some more upper levels, but I just didn't want to add on to my studnt loans.

    If you're up to your neck in debt, then I would take classes at the cheapest place possible. If money isn't an option, take them at a 4 year school. This is just my opinion, though. n= 1 lol.
     
  6. JonnyL

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    Doesn't matter if you do well in the courses and your MCAT score is strong.
     
  7. JESSFALLING

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    I think that it won't stop you from becoming a doctor if you post great grades. A few schools may really frown on it....but you can hopefully weed them out beforehand and not waste an application fee on them. You should contact your top schools and ask them directly if this will be a concern for them (as the "horse's mouth" > SDN).

    I also think that you can build a case for completing the requirements at CC to save money. Also, if the CC is closer to home you could use that as another argument to support your decision too. As long as adcoms don't perceive that you "took the easy way out" you'll likely be okay.
     
  8. TOMWALK

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    Speaking from personal experience, I would say it doesn't matter, except you should be sure that the classes you are taking would otherwise transfer to a 4-year university. Your state or region should have a course transfer/equivalency system available online. Confirm with that before you register for your CC classes.

    My $.02 cents: I've attended 2 tier-one research universities and had many of my classes taught by grad students who had no clue. The same holds true for some of my professors. At any rate, the learning experience at regional campuses of major universities is something to consider as an alternative to community college. It's typically only slightly more expensive (depending on where you go), the labs and facilities are usually much better, you get the same intimate learning experience (taught by a PhD), nd your transcript bears the name of the university. Just something to think about.

    I'm in the same boat, by the way, except that I'm a nontraditional student finishing up prereqs. Good luck, and keep us posted!
     
  9. punjabimc

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    Just make sure if you take the chemistry or organic chemistry series at a community college that there is a ACS standardized exam at the end of the series. It wouldn't matter then WHERE you took the series as you'd take the same standardized exam at the end of the series as any student at a University.

    When you say "alot"..what exactly are you referring to?
     
  10. Drrrrrr. Celty

    Drrrrrr. Celty Osteo Dullahan
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    C.C ( With prereqs) -> 4 year college ( With some upper levels) = Just fine
    4 year college -> C.C ( to take prereqs) = Bad.

    You'd be better off doing a post-bacc, or at least limiting the amount of prereqs you do at a CC to like intro bio or gen chem.
     
  11. artsciencelove

    artsciencelove Class of 2016
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    The online MSAR has an entry for "accepts community college credit".

    For almost every school, it's "yes" or "on a case by case basis", which I'm interpreting as "not ideal, but we'll look at you if you have good grades and MCAT".
     
  12. TriagePreMed

    TriagePreMed Membership Revoked
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    I disagree. There are other factors. Did the student get a science degree? How long has the student been out of school? Will the student apply as disadvantaged? Is the student working while doing his coursework? Etc.
     

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