GreysHouse

10+ Year Member
Dec 18, 2008
4
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Wow, so SDN is extremely addictive. This can't be good. =P

I'm in my second year at UT Austin and I decided to take a break from the sciences. Fortunately, I came in with a lot of hours so I have a lot of room to play with in my degree plan (I'm majoring in Asian-American Studies). :) I've already completed a year of general bio and general chem with their respective labs.

Anyways, I was wondering if med schools look at where you take your sciences. I think there's a general consensus NOT to take any of your sciences at a community college for obvious reasons.

The reason I ask is because UT Austin is apparently ranked in the world for umm... everything research-related. As such, they structure all of their classes to train all their undergrads to become research-scientists, so there's so much unnecessary theory that's emphasized.

Would it look bad if I took physics (and possibly organic chem) at another four-year institution? Basically... does the reputation of your undergraduate institution play a role during the application process?

Last question: I was naive and thought I was going to major in biomedical engineering so I took all my calculus classes (12 hours worth of calc) at my community college... I made straight Bs through them. Do you think this could come back to help or hurt me when I apply?

Thanks for any feedback you can give me!!! :thumbup:
 

Bleurberry

10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jan 30, 2007
649
2
Status
Medical Student
Wow, so SDN is extremely addictive. This can't be good. =P

I'm in my second year at UT Austin and I decided to take a break from the sciences. Fortunately, I came in with a lot of hours so I have a lot of room to play with in my degree plan (I'm majoring in Asian-American Studies). :) I've already completed a year of general bio and general chem with their respective labs.

Anyways, I was wondering if med schools look at where you take your sciences. I think there's a general consensus NOT to take any of your sciences at a community college for obvious reasons.

The reason I ask is because UT Austin is apparently ranked in the world for umm... everything research-related. As such, they structure all of their classes to train all their undergrads to become research-scientists, so there's so much unnecessary theory that's emphasized.

Would it look bad if I took physics (and possibly organic chem) at another four-year institution? Basically... does the reputation of your undergraduate institution play a role during the application process?

Last question: I was naive and thought I was going to major in biomedical engineering so I took all my calculus classes (12 hours worth of calc) at my community college... I made straight Bs through them. Do you think this could come back to help or hurt me when I apply?

Thanks for any feedback you can give me!!! :thumbup:
I would call some of the schools you're interested in and ask them. You don't even have to give them your name if you'd feel more comfortable. Ask to speak to an admissions counselor and get their view on it. I ended up taking algebra based physics because when I returned (non-trad) to do the pre-reqs after having left my degree in Spanish Literature in a state of limbo, I found out it was going to be a 3 year process, not two, because of Calc I & II before physics! I can't imagine how insecure I'd have been not knowing. As far as the B's... as far as I know, Calc is Math and Math isn't factored into your science GPA for AACOMAS. So I wouldnt be overly concerned. Get A's in physics, though, if you can.

Edit:

Just for further clarification on the calc situation; The reason I didn't HAVE to take calculus was more to do with my major, and less the requirements of the school. Typically, science majors have to take calculus because it's built into the requirements of their major, whether it be chemistry or biology or otherwise. Spanish Literature had no such requirement, obviously, and I was grateful to find out that I wouldn't have to jump through Calc I and II hoops to take the calc-based physics. My alg. based physics professor assured me (he teaches both calc. and alg.) that they are basically the same course, but algebra can even be a little more complex at times because calc is made for physics. that's from a physicist point of view, so take it with a grain of salt. I don't intend to start a calculus sub-thread :) I ended up loving physics, but with Orgo, Bio and all the labs all at the same time, it was a bit overwhelming at times.
 
Last edited:

engineeredout

10+ Year Member
May 11, 2008
3,446
609
Pennsylvania
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
Last question: I was naive and thought I was going to major in biomedical engineering so I took all my calculus classes (12 hours worth of calc) at my community college... I made straight Bs through them. Do you think this could come back to help or hurt me when I apply?
Nothing wrong with Bs in differential equations and multivariable. I got B+s in every one of my calc courses (all four of them like you) and it certainly wasn't my weak point. Is it going to help you? Not especially no, but some schools want to see math courses taken and calc is always good.
 
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123165

Nothing wrong with Bs in differential equations and multivariable. I got B+s in every one of my calc courses (all four of them like you) and it certainly wasn't my weak point. Is it going to help you? Not especially no, but some schools want to see math courses taken and calc is always good.
I totally agree here. Depending on your science GPA it could help or hurt. If you have a high science GPA, it could be helpful that DO does not count math in your science GPA (am I right about this?), so those B's will not drag it down.
 
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