• AMA with Certified Student Loan Professional

    Join SDN on December 7th at 6:00 PM Eastern as we host Andrew Paulson of StudentLoanAdvice.com for an AMA webinar. He'll be answering your questions about how to best manage your student loans. Register now!

quantum numbers

OU11BB

Full Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Aug 8, 2008
366
4
  1. Dental Student
    what are the quantum numbers that could define an outer valence electon of Co+3? I know that the configuration for Co is [Ar] 4s2 3d7. since it is +3 would the electrons leave the d subshell first or the S subshell and why? Thanks very much.
     

    Valigator00

    Full Member
    10+ Year Member
    5+ Year Member
    Mar 4, 2009
    247
    1
    Buffalo
    1. Dental Student
      what are the quantum numbers that could define an outer valence electon of Co+3? I know that the configuration for Co is [Ar] 4s2 3d7. since it is +3 would the electrons leave the d subshell first or the S subshell and why? Thanks very much.

      I "think" the electrons would leave the d orbital first, because d orbital is the last one that fills. I am not certain.
       

      sixkiller

      Full Member
      Jun 19, 2009
      275
      0
        i think it would be S since it is lower energy, or maybe not since it want to be in the lowest energy.

        Actually, it's higher in energy once the d-subshell starts to fill....

        That's why transition metals lose the ns electron before the (n-1)d electrons...because it's higher in potential energy and thus more readily lost.

        The ns subshell fills before (n-1)d because INITIALLY it is LOWER in energy. Therefore, in accordance with Aufbau ordering, ns fills before (n-1)d subshell.

        However, once the (n-1)d subshell starts to fill, the d subshell electron(s) exert a shielding effect on the ns electrons....

        Now, the ns electron is HIGHER in potential energy.
         
        About the Ads

        Valigator00

        Full Member
        10+ Year Member
        5+ Year Member
        Mar 4, 2009
        247
        1
        Buffalo
        1. Dental Student
          Actually, it's higher in energy once the d-subshell starts to fill....

          That's why transition metals lose the ns electron before the (n-1)d electrons...because it's higher in potential energy and thus more readily lost.

          The ns subshell fills before (n-1)d because INITIALLY it is LOWER in energy. Therefore, in accordance with Aufbau ordering, ns fills before (n-1)d subshell.

          However, once the (n-1)d subshell starts to fill, the d subshell electron(s) exert a shielding effect on the ns electrons....

          Now, the ns electron is HIGHER in potential energy.

          Is this only true of transition metals?
           
          This thread is more than 12 years old.

          Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

          1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
          2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
          3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
          4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
          5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
          6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
          7. This thread is locked.