hamsterpants

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I figure as April approaches, and with it more acceptances, there will be questions about financial aid.

Here are three to start:

1. I filed a FAFSA with the income I made at my job in 2009 as instructed but obviously when I begin the school year as a grad student, I will not have that income coming in. How do I indicate this on the FAFSA or do I discuss it with the school's aid office? I am just afraid I won't be eligible for aid or loans because my income will seem artificially high.

2. If you want to take out Stafford Loans is there anything you need to do besides filling out the FAFSA? Is there another form to fill out? If so, when should do this and where can I get it?

3. I am assuming aid, stipends and loans are disbursed at the beginning of the semester. Is there anyway to receive them earlier, to help cover moving costs?
 

LM02

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I don't know the answers to all of your questions, but regarding tuition remission, that is something typically handled internally - the credit just appears on your tuition bill. Stipends are spread out over the academic year, so you will in essence get a "pay check." It does not come in one lump sum.

Also, if your school pays it out monthly (vs. bi-weekly), be prepared to go a month before you get your first stipend payment (eg, September's stipend payment comes on Sept 30).
 

hamsterpants

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I don't know the answers to all of your questions, but regarding tuition remission, that is something typically handled internally - the credit just appears on your tuition bill. Stipends are spread out over the academic year, so you will in essence get a "pay check." It does not come in one lump sum.

Also, if your school pays it out monthly (vs. bi-weekly), be prepared to go a month before you get your first stipend payment (eg, September's stipend payment comes on Sept 30).
ah, I was afraid of that. Thanks!
 

psychgirl77

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Stipends are spread out over the academic year, so you will in essence get a "pay check." It does not come in one lump sum.
My stipend comes as a lump sum so it probably depends on the school.
 

LM02

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Wow, I never heard of that! I've already graduated and am a faculty member - I know a lot of people who have gone to a lot of clinical psych programs, and that has never come up.

I suppose it's worth asking about.
 
Mar 18, 2010
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Hi ALL

So aside from filing you FAFSA you will need to complete entrance counseling (education about your loans) as well as sign master promissory note which essentially gives the school permission to borrow money on your behalf.
Here is the website which allows you to do it all online (PS the site is down right now for repairs)

https://studentloans.gov/myDirectLoan/index.actionhttp://www.dlenote.ed.gov/


There are several different federal loan options-
Stafford Loan- Subsidized and Unsubsidized
The subsidized loan is about 8500- you are not required to pay the interest while in school.
The unsubsidized loan is 12000- you will pay the interest.

The Graduate PLUS Loan
They will provide you with as mush money as you need, but you must pass a credit check.
The interest will be charged to you.. I believe its like 7.9%
 
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hamsterpants

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I was told that the stipend is paid on a monthly basis (at Temple).
Thanks. I think I do remember that too.

What about Stafford loans, any way to get those early??
 
Jan 22, 2010
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Thanks. I think I do remember that too.

What about Stafford loans, any way to get those early??
I would recommend contacting Temple's financial aid office.

I think dispersement depends upon the school. I know that at my school my funds are often disbersed a week or so before the semester begins.

However, I recall that they actually waited to disperse my first semester of funds until AFTER I started school because they want to make sure that you actually attend classes before they disperse the money.

Contact Temple's financial aid office. They can give you the details of how they do things there.
 

hamsterpants

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Hi ALL

So aside from filing you FAFSA you will need to complete entrance counseling (education about your loans) as well as sign master promissory note which essentially gives the school permission to borrow money on your behalf.
Here is the website which allows you to do it all online (PS the site is down right now for repairs)

www.dlenote.ed.gov/


There are several different federal loan options-
Stafford Loan- Subsidized and Unsubsidized
The subsidized loan is about 8500- you are not required to pay the interest while in school.
The unsubsidized loan is 12000- you will pay the interest.

The Graduate PLUS Loan
They will provide you with as mush money as you need, but you must pass a credit check.
The interest will be charged to you.. I believe its like 7.9%
Thanks!

So do I wait til the grad school contacts me about loans or do initiate the process at the website you mentioned?

I hope to live primarily on my stipend but I would like another option for emergencies, etc.
 

hamsterpants

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I would recommend contacting Temple's financial aid office.

I think dispersement depends upon the school. I know that at my school my funds are often disbersed a week or so before the semester begins.

However, I recall that they actually waited to disperse my first semester of funds until AFTER I started school because they want to make sure that you actually attend classes before they disperse the money.

Contact Temple's financial aid office. They can give you the details of how they do things there.
Thanks, good advice.
 
Mar 18, 2010
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Hey hamster-

you can go ahead and do it all on your own.. I am sure the school will mail a reminder to you. However there is no reason not to do it now- it takes like 30 minutes to get it all done!
 

hamsterpants

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Hey hamster-

you can go ahead and do it all on your own.. I am sure the school will mail a reminder to you. However there is no reason not to do it now- it takes like 30 minutes to get it all done!
Thank you!
 

cheer12345

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Hey, this is a great thread; in fact, I was about to start a similar one myself.

I am preparing to begin a program this Fall, but unfortunately there is no funding. I have been looking around for GA's but I also need to begin the process of taking out a loan. I have not filled out FAFSA or done anything yet.

Can someone list a step-by-step for what I need to do (I have been blessed to have no student loans up until now)???

Also, any other recommendations on how to fund school besides GAs and loans would be much appreciated as well!
 

notfullyfathomd

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I just talked to financial aid at my future school, so I have some answers to these questions to share.

1. I filed a FAFSA with the income I made at my job in 2009 as instructed but obviously when I begin the school year as a grad student, I will not have that income coming in. How do I indicate this on the FAFSA or do I discuss it with the school's aid office? I am just afraid I won't be eligible for aid or loans because my income will seem artificially high.
Graduate students will all qualify for $20,500 per year of federal aid. The maximum subsidized (loans where the gov't pays the interest while you are a student and 6 mos after you graduate) that you can receive is $8,500, and the remainder is made up of unsubsidized loans. The proportion is determined by your FAFSA (and 2009 income, although that will change next year when you file as a student).

2. If you want to take out Stafford Loans is there anything you need to do besides filling out the FAFSA? Is there another form to fill out? If so, when should do this and where can I get it?
My school had an additional form that let them know how many credits you would be enrolled for, how many terms, what other support you would receive (ie, tuition remission, scholarships/fellowships). My understanding is that the loan money goes to the school first to pay off your tuition balance (eg, any fees not covered by tuition remission), and the remainder can be directly deposited into your bank account to cover living expenses.

My experience with financial aid offices in both undergrad and now graduate school is that they are used to handling these types of questions and are eager to help. I definitely think you should give them a call and ask them everything that you posted here, because the details will vary by school.

Here is an FAQ about Stafford loans:
http://studentaid.ed.gov/PORTALSWebApp/students/english/studentloans.jsp?tab=funding

Lastly, here is a good article about choosing Stafford loans: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/05/education/edlife/spend.html?emc=eta1

Hope this is helpful!!
 

notfullyfathomd

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Also, hamster - I will be in Philly next year too! I've only been there once before (for my interview), but PM me if you want to talk neighborhoods. :)
 
Nov 28, 2009
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Here is an FAQ about Stafford loans:
http://studentaid.ed.gov/PORTALSWebApp/students/english/studentloans.jsp?tab=funding

Lastly, here is a good article about choosing Stafford loans: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/05/education/edlife/spend.html?emc=eta1

Hope this is helpful!!
Keep in mind that President Obama recently signed student loan reform into law (just yesterday). Some of the info. in the above links may be dated and irrelevant. It may be a good idea to wait for a little while to see exactly how things shake out. The general principles have been documented in the media, but it's not like everyone (including the Dept. of Ed.) has updated all of their information to reflect this new law.

Setting aside the politics of the shift, the reality is that there is a new law on the books that relates to student borrowing, so it's must know stuff if you plan on borrowing money to support your tuition and/or living expenses in the coming years.

Basically, Stafford Loans (as of July 1, 2010) will involve ONLY direct lending from the U.S. Dept. of Education. Previously some Stafford Loans were direct loans from the government and some were private loans with government backing. (Now, a private company may still "service" your government loan -- e.g., keep track of the account, payments, etc. -- but the Federal government will be the lender, with the middleman being effectively cut out of the process).

Besides knowing exactly who your lender is and what the terms are, there are other benefits to this change. Chiefly, your government-provided Stafford Loans qualify for a repayment "cap." The cap isn't new, but the size of the cap changed. It used to be that you wouldn't have to pay over 15% of your income toward the loan; under the new law, the cap goes down to 10% of your income. Previously, loans made by government-subsidized private lenders did NOT qualify for those "payment cap" limits; now ALL stafford loans will qualify for those terms, because they ALL come from the Federal government.

Private loans will still exist, of course, but they won't be "Stafford Loans".

The article sums up the changes nicely.

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2010/03/3-cheers-for-the-new-student-lending-law/38188/http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2010/03/3-cheers-for-the-new-student-lending-law/38188/

:D



 
Jan 22, 2010
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It may be a good idea to wait for a little while to see exactly how things shake out.
Such a good point!!! I contacted my future school's financial aid office, and asked how the new laws would affect my financial aid. I even referenced the name of the then act. And, the individual I talked to had no idea what I was talking about.

Maybe give your financial aid office another week or so before contacting someone. : )
 

hamsterpants

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I just talked to financial aid at my future school, so I have some answers to these questions to share.



Graduate students will all qualify for $20,500 per year of federal aid. The maximum subsidized (loans where the gov't pays the interest while you are a student and 6 mos after you graduate) that you can receive is $8,500, and the remainder is made up of unsubsidized loans. The proportion is determined by your FAFSA (and 2009 income, although that will change next year when you file as a student).



My school had an additional form that let them know how many credits you would be enrolled for, how many terms, what other support you would receive (ie, tuition remission, scholarships/fellowships). My understanding is that the loan money goes to the school first to pay off your tuition balance (eg, any fees not covered by tuition remission), and the remainder can be directly deposited into your bank account to cover living expenses.

My experience with financial aid offices in both undergrad and now graduate school is that they are used to handling these types of questions and are eager to help. I definitely think you should give them a call and ask them everything that you posted here, because the details will vary by school.

Here is an FAQ about Stafford loans:
http://studentaid.ed.gov/PORTALSWebApp/students/english/studentloans.jsp?tab=funding

Lastly, here is a good article about choosing Stafford loans: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/05/education/edlife/spend.html?emc=eta1

Hope this is helpful!!
Thanks, this was very helpful!

I emailed my school's Financial Aid office with more detailed questions. If I don't hear from them soon, I will try calling.
 

hamsterpants

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Keep in mind that President Obama recently signed student loan reform into law (just yesterday). Some of the info. in the above links may be dated and irrelevant. It may be a good idea to wait for a little while to see exactly how things shake out. The general principles have been documented in the media, but it's not like everyone (including the Dept. of Ed.) has updated all of their information to reflect this new law.

Setting aside the politics of the shift, the reality is that there is a new law on the books that relates to student borrowing, so it's must know stuff if you plan on borrowing money to support your tuition and/or living expenses in the coming years.

Basically, Stafford Loans (as of July 1, 2010) will involve ONLY direct lending from the U.S. Dept. of Education. Previously some Stafford Loans were direct loans from the government and some were private loans with government backing. (Now, a private company may still "service" your government loan -- e.g., keep track of the account, payments, etc. -- but the Federal government will be the lender, with the middleman being effectively cut out of the process).

Besides knowing exactly who your lender is and what the terms are, there are other benefits to this change. Chiefly, your government-provided Stafford Loans qualify for a repayment "cap." The cap isn't new, but the size of the cap changed. It used to be that you wouldn't have to pay over 15% of your income toward the loan; under the new law, the cap goes down to 10% of your income. Previously, loans made by government-subsidized private lenders did NOT qualify for those "payment cap" limits; now ALL stafford loans will qualify for those terms, because they ALL come from the Federal government.

Private loans will still exist, of course, but they won't be "Stafford Loans".

The article sums up the changes nicely.

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2010/03/3-cheers-for-the-new-student-lending-law/38188/

:D
Thanks. Good point!

Someone told me these changes do not take effect until 2014. Is that incorrect?
 

hamsterpants

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"Students who borrow money starting in July 2014 will be allowed to cap repayments at 10 percent of income above a basic living allowance, instead of 15 percent. Moreover, if they keep up payments, their balances will be forgiven after 20 years instead of 25 years — or after 10 years if they are in public service, like teaching, nursing or serving in the military."

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/31/us/politics/31obama.html?ref=education
 
Nov 28, 2009
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"Students who borrow money starting in July 2014 will be allowed to cap repayments at 10 percent of income above a basic living allowance, instead of 15 percent. Moreover, if they keep up payments, their balances will be forgiven after 20 years instead of 25 years — or after 10 years if they are in public service, like teaching, nursing or serving in the military."

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/31/us/politics/31obama.html?ref=education
Well, there you go ... another reason to wait for a bit to see the REAL scoop ... sources aren't always correct ...

It's possible that there are different effective dates for different parts of the program. For example, perhaps the direct LENDING begins in 2010 but the income payment cap reduction begins in 2014. They did something similar with healthcare reform -- some portions of the law are effective this year, others aren't effective until 2014, etc.

http://abcnews.go.com/WN/Politics/health-care-obama-signs-student-loan-overhaul-legislation/story?id=10239569

The above article (just one source I found quickly) mentions a July 1 start date (presumably this year), but that may only be referring to the lending portion, not the repayment cap portion.

Also, the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program (which has some similarities to the repayment part of the new law) already existed before this latest law:

http://www.finaid.org/loans/publicservice.phtml

I still need more education on the forgiveness program and the new law.

Perhaps the new law is even more expansive (applying to ALL Stafford loans) and provides "repayment relief" to folks who don't qualify for the forgiveness program (which is very specific about focusing on low-income, service-type careers).

I'll share updates as I learn more.
 
Jan 22, 2010
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I read that the government will take over student loans (eliminating the middleman, ie, banks) by this fall.

hamsterpants, I think you are right. I think there must be different effective dates for various parts of law.
 

hamsterpants

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Well, there you go ... another reason to wait for a bit to see the REAL scoop ... sources aren't always correct ...

It's possible that there are different effective dates for different parts of the program. For example, perhaps the direct LENDING begins in 2010 but the income payment cap reduction begins in 2014. They did something similar with healthcare reform -- some portions of the law are effective this year, others aren't effective until 2014, etc.

http://abcnews.go.com/WN/Politics/health-care-obama-signs-student-loan-overhaul-legislation/story?id=10239569

The above article (just one source I found quickly) mentions a July 1 start date (presumably this year), but that may only be referring to the lending portion, not the repayment cap portion.

Also, the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program (which has some similarities to the repayment part of the new law) already existed before this latest law:

http://www.finaid.org/loans/publicservice.phtml

I still need more education on the forgiveness program and the new law.

Perhaps the new law is even more expansive (applying to ALL Stafford loans) and provides "repayment relief" to folks who don't qualify for the forgiveness program (which is very specific about focusing on low-income, service-type careers).

I'll share updates as I learn more.
You're right. It was hard to find but "All colleges would be required to convert to the federal Direct Loan program by July 1, 2010."
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/18/education/18educ.html?fta=y

Thanks for the updates!
 
Nov 28, 2009
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http://www.bankrate.com/finance/college-finance/financial-aid-changes-in-health-reform-law-1.aspx

I also found this article which verifies previous information (Direct Federal LENDING begins July 2010 while REPAYMENT changes don't take effect until 2014) and also addresses changes in PLUS loans.

Apparently, parent and graduate PLUS loans will also come directly from the Federal government (along with a nice little interest rate reduction). It seems the government is also less likely to deny access to these loans than private lenders. Specifically, you can only be denied a PLUS loan if you have an "adverse" credit history (e.g., failing to pay your bills). They won't deny you for having a less-than-stellar credit history (private lenders were doing that to applicants). I don't know if this is a recipe for disaster (provide big loans to folks who can't afford them??? didn't we see some not so great results from that sort of thinking already??? sub-prime mortgages, anybody???). As far as government risk taking, I'm not so sure about this change, but it ultimately means good news for a student trying to pay for grad school (credit access), especially if she has a lot of consumer or undergrad debt already.

Of course, PLUS loans will probably be most relevant to those in programs with limited or no funding.

The really good news, in my opinion, is that PLUS loans that are received directly from the government are eligible for consolidation. Consolidate those puppies and then do the income based repayment plan and get loan forgiveness after 25 years (yeah, it's a long time)...but prior to this change private PLUS loans would never have been eligible for forgiveness.
 

hamsterpants

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http://www.bankrate.com/finance/college-finance/financial-aid-changes-in-health-reform-law-1.aspx

I also found this article which verifies previous information (Direct Federal LENDING begins July 2010 while REPAYMENT changes don't take effect until 2014) and also addresses changes in PLUS loans.

Apparently, parent and graduate PLUS loans will also come directly from the Federal government (along with a nice little interest rate reduction). It seems the government is also less likely to deny access to these loans than private lenders. Specifically, you can only be denied a PLUS loan if you have an "adverse" credit history (e.g., failing to pay your bills). They won't deny you for having a less-than-stellar credit history (private lenders were doing that to applicants). I don't know if this is a recipe for disaster (provide big loans to folks who can't afford them??? didn't we see some not so great results from that sort of thinking already??? sub-prime mortgages, anybody???). As far as government risk taking, I'm not so sure about this change, but it ultimately means good news for a student trying to pay for grad school (credit access), especially if she has a lot of consumer or undergrad debt already.

Of course, PLUS loans will probably be most relevant to those in programs with limited or no funding.

The really good news, in my opinion, is that PLUS loans that are received directly from the government are eligible for consolidation. Consolidate those puppies and then do the income based repayment plan and get loan forgiveness after 25 years (yeah, it's a long time)...but prior to this change private PLUS loans would never have been eligible for forgiveness.

Thank you! Financial know-how is not one of my strong points. You explain it well.
 

Buzzwordsoldier

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So if a student begins taking out loans this fall, and has not yet graduated/is still taking loans come 2014, do the repayment changes apply to funds borrowed along the way?
 

Wildcat06

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Hey Hamsterpants,

I'm really surprised no one has said this yet, but there is actually a VERY good chance that you are NOT eligible for federal student loans.

You are going to Temple next year correct? Which I am guessing offers a full tuition remission and fairly generous stipend...?

This was the case for me at my program. In fact, I make enough money that the university said I have no "need" because my stipend is higher than the estimated cost of attendance/living (which isn't exactly true for me). As such, I was ineligible for federal loans and had to take out a private education loan when I started last year.

You might want to look into this with your program administrator or current grad students, or at least have a backup plan in case your grad school denies you federal money.
 

hamsterpants

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Hey Hamsterpants,

I'm really surprised no one has said this yet, but there is actually a VERY good chance that you are NOT eligible for federal student loans.

You are going to Temple next year correct? Which I am guessing offers a full tuition remission and fairly generous stipend...?

This was the case for me at my program. In fact, I make enough money that the university said I have no "need" because my stipend is higher than the estimated cost of attendance/living (which isn't exactly true for me). As such, I was ineligible for federal loans and had to take out a private education loan when I started last year.

You might want to look into this with your program administrator or current grad students, or at least have a backup plan in case your grad school denies you federal money.
Most of the students I met at Temple seemed to have loans, I assumed they were federal but perhaps they are actually private loans. I hope to live on my stipend but I want to be prepared with other options. Does the school help you find private educational loans or do you have to find them yourself? Thx.
 

Wildcat06

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Most of the students I met at Temple seemed to have loans, I assumed they were federal but perhaps they are actually private loans. I hope to live on my stipend but I want to be prepared with other options. Does the school help you find private educational loans or do you have to find them yourself? Thx.
My school had a list of "preferred" lenders, or something along those lines, about 3 or 4 lenders they had vetted and who would provide loans to their students. I used this list (from the university's financial aid website) and found the one that fit best for me. I only took out a little money to supplement my fellowship so it wasn't too big of a deal. But my school did require me to submit a budget to prove I needed the money (which is a good precaution against reckless borrowing).

The obvious problem with private loans is that they aren't subsidized and thus will accumulate interest while you are in school. However, you are lucky that interest rates are still low so it shouldn't be too crazy. They will be lower if you have a parent who's willing to cosign for you (which is ridiculous when you're an adult, but hey, saving money is saving money).
 

hamsterpants

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Also, hamster - I will be in Philly next year too! I've only been there once before (for my interview), but PM me if you want to talk neighborhoods. :)
cool, we will have to keep in touch!
 

hamsterpants

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So if a student begins taking out loans this fall, and has not yet graduated/is still taking loans come 2014, do the repayment changes apply to funds borrowed along the way?
I don't think the repayment changes apply to loans taken out before 2014.
 
Nov 28, 2009
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I don't think the repayment changes apply to loans taken out before 2014.
Technically, I think that's true. However, I suspect there is a work around.

This will require some further explanation from the Dept. of Ed., and we'll probably see this described more clearly in the coming months. However, I suspect in the future you will be able to CONSOLIDATE any loans you take out in the coming years. For those entering grad school this year, who plans on graduating before 2014?

The "new" loan (the consolidation loan) would be taken out in 2016 or whatever. Thus, it would be effective AFTER 2014. As such, it would qualify for the new repayment rules. If you chose not to consolidate for some reason, and you maintained your 2010, 2011, etc., those loans would be subject to the OLD rules.

Here's why I think this will work. I consolidated old loans (1990's undergrad) into a new loan this year; the new loan was then eligible for the 2008 (???) rules. (A similar law change went into effect a couple of years back -- that's when the public service loan forgiveness program became an option; it didn't exist prior to that).

Now, maybe this particular law is different; but there is a precedent for something similar happening. So, my thinking is that we'll ultimately be able to take advantage of the repayment rule change ... provided we consolidate after 2014... and assuming the law doesn't change in the interim :laugh:
 
Mar 17, 2010
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I just got an e-mail from one of my schools about the new loan process:

If you have, or will apply for a federal student loan (old Stafford Loan now called the federal Direct Loan) for next year, there are two very important steps that you must complete in order to qualify for the loan.

1. Complete an on-line Master Promissory Note (MPN) (https://dlenote.ed.gov/empn/index.jsp) with the Federal Direct Loan Program. You will need to provide your FAFSA PIN number in order to complete. You cannot receive any loan money until you complete the Direct Loan promissory note.

2. If this is the first time receiving a federal student loan while at USC you must complete Entrance Loan Counseling (https://www.dlssonline.com/borrower/EntrCounselingPage.do?cmd=doStart). If you are unsure if you have received such a loan, we encourage you to complete entrance counseling again. You will not receive any loan money until you complete this entrance loan counseling.

3.If you think you will need additional loan assistance, you should first consider the federal Direct GRAD PLUS loan. Complete application instructions regarding this program will not be available until late March. We will inform you when they become available

We encourage you to complete both of these steps even if you are unsure whether you will need a loan for 2010-11. You may decline any loan that is offered to you and incur no loan repayment obligation.

You may also complete both steps even if you have not yet completed your FAFSA for 2010-11. We encourage you to file as soon as you can.
 
Jan 22, 2010
235
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I just got an e-mail from one of my schools about the new loan process:

If you have, or will apply for a federal student loan (old Stafford Loan now called the federal Direct Loan) for next year, there are two very important steps that you must complete in order to qualify for the loan.

1. Complete an on-line Master Promissory Note (MPN) (https://dlenote.ed.gov/empn/index.jsp) with the Federal Direct Loan Program. You will need to provide your FAFSA PIN number in order to complete. You cannot receive any loan money until you complete the Direct Loan promissory note.

2. If this is the first time receiving a federal student loan while at USC you must complete Entrance Loan Counseling (https://www.dlssonline.com/borrower/EntrCounselingPage.do?cmd=doStart). If you are unsure if you have received such a loan, we encourage you to complete entrance counseling again. You will not receive any loan money until you complete this entrance loan counseling.

3.If you think you will need additional loan assistance, you should first consider the federal Direct GRAD PLUS loan. Complete application instructions regarding this program will not be available until late March. We will inform you when they become available

We encourage you to complete both of these steps even if you are unsure whether you will need a loan for 2010-11. You may decline any loan that is offered to you and incur no loan repayment obligation.

You may also complete both steps even if you have not yet completed your FAFSA for 2010-11. We encourage you to file as soon as you can.
Thanks! Great info. Since it's now April, did you get any information from your school about applying for the Direct Grad Plus loan yet? If so, what are the specifics for applying for those loans?
 
Mar 17, 2010
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Thanks! Great info. Since it's now April, did you get any information from your school about applying for the Direct Grad Plus loan yet? If so, what are the specifics for applying for those loans?
No, I haven't gotten any other information, I just got that e-mail this morning.
You should probably talk to your school's financial aid office, I'm sure they'll have the info.
 
Jan 22, 2010
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No, I haven't gotten any other information, I just got that e-mail this morning.
You should probably talk to your school's financial aid office, I'm sure they'll have the info.
Yes, but I don't know how helpful they will be. When I contacted them earlier this week, the person I spoke with hadn't even heard of the healthcare bill. It is a little scary that I know that the passing of the bill has ramifications for student loans, and the person at the financial aid office had no clue.
 
Mar 17, 2010
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Yes, but I don't know how helpful they will be. When I contacted them earlier this week, the person I spoke with hadn't even heard of the healthcare bill. It is a little scary that I know that the passing of the bill has ramifications for student loans, and the person at the financial aid office had no clue.
In that case I can forward you the info once I receive it.