5

577455

I've been working as a Scribe for a busy Emergency Department for the past year. I've learned a lot, and I've gained a lot of experience. Right now, I'm busy with my last year of school. I have a 3.6 right now, I'd like to end with a 3.7. I've thought long and hard, and I think it's time to leave.

My issue is that I don't really see the chief scribe around, she's a student, and we don't really work the same shifts. I'd like to end this right. My current plan is to give her a call, let her know that I'm planning on giving her my resignation, and that I will be emailing her my official notice soon.

Does this sound like a good plan to you guys? I'm actually really nervous. There's something about me that just hates quitting things, but I feel like this move is best for me.
 

shannonigans

i prefer heartbeats to retweets
Feb 16, 2014
49
27
SoFla
Status
Pre-Medical
That sounds like a very professional, mature way of handling the situation. Quitting a job is ALWAYS unsettling, but it's good that you want to call her, let her know that you need to focus on your studies so you can get the GPA you want, and thank her for the opportunities your scribe position has given you. She'll let you know f she needs an official letter or if the phone call is good enough- just be sure to give her 2 weeks (if possible) or any amount of time you think you can give while they get a new scribe in place.

Good luck!
 

YourMD

7+ Year Member
Apr 25, 2011
466
139
Status
Medical Student
Get the LOR, Submit your resignation, and don't burn any bridges. You should be fine! Don't worry about it looking bad to adcoms they will love that you have the experience. In most cases, your numbers are going the you the interview everything else is icing on the cake. Goodluck!
 

mehc012

Big Damn Hero
7+ Year Member
Jul 9, 2012
9,323
8,340
The Black
Status
Medical Student
I've been working as a Scribe for a busy Emergency Department for the past year. I've learned a lot, and I've gained a lot of experience. Right now, I'm busy with my last year of school. I have a 3.6 right now, I'd like to end with a 3.7. I've thought long and hard, and I think it's time to leave.

My issue is that I don't really see the chief scribe around, she's a student, and we don't really work the same shifts. I'd like to end this right. My current plan is to give her a call, let her know that I'm planning on giving her my resignation, and that I will be emailing her my official notice soon.

Does this sound like a good plan to you guys? I'm actually really nervous. There's something about me that just hates quitting things, but I feel like this move is best for me.
I did this yesterday myself! I replied to my chief's email, though, and told her to put me on next month's schedule as infrequently as possible and then that would be my last month. That gives them 3.5wks of this month before I cut back, and then all of next month before I leave for good. I'm not on the holiday schedule, so that helped.

Now I just have to figure out how best to approach the docs for a letter...
 
Apr 8, 2011
285
55
Bay Area
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Secure an LOR first!!!!!!

Extra exclamation marks because it's important. Repetition because it's important.
If you have doctor you're close to, ask them all for letters of recommendation. It's better to get multiple in case if one of them takes a long time; I've been in this situation before. Also, if you're using interfolio, it'll be very easy to choose which letters go to which school in case you end up with more than necessary.

Other than that, it seems like you have a good idea of what to do.
 

swolebrah

sup
5+ Year Member
Oct 30, 2013
554
269
Status
Medical Student
Anyone else worried about asking docs for LOR? Lmao I thought I was the only one in the predicament, I'm quitting soon as well. Honestly don't give a **** about the scribe company, but I gotta secure that LOR .


Secure an LOR first!!!!!!

Extra exclamation marks because it's important. Repetition because it's important.
If you have doctor you're close to, ask them all for letters of recommendation. It's better to get multiple in case if one of them takes a long time; I've been in this situation before. Also, if you're using interfolio, it'll be very easy to choose which letters go to which school in case you end up with more than necessary.

Other than that, it seems like you have a good idea of what to do.
Any tips bro? I'm in this situation.
 

mehc012

Big Damn Hero
7+ Year Member
Jul 9, 2012
9,323
8,340
The Black
Status
Medical Student
Anyone else worried about asking docs for LOR? Lmao I thought I was the only one in the predicament, I'm quitting soon as well. Honestly don't give a **** about the scribe company, but I gotta secure that LOR .



Any tips bro? I'm in this situation.
Yeah, as I said I just put in my notice, and all of a sudden it's stressing me out.
 

HinduHammer

Righteous in Wrath
5+ Year Member
Aug 6, 2013
642
520
Starfall
Status
Medical Student
I've been working as a Scribe for a busy Emergency Department for the past year. I've learned a lot, and I've gained a lot of experience. Right now, I'm busy with my last year of school. I have a 3.6 right now, I'd like to end with a 3.7. I've thought long and hard, and I think it's time to leave.

My issue is that I don't really see the chief scribe around, she's a student, and we don't really work the same shifts. I'd like to end this right. My current plan is to give her a call, let her know that I'm planning on giving her my resignation, and that I will be emailing her my official notice soon.

Does this sound like a good plan to you guys? I'm actually really nervous. There's something about me that just hates quitting things, but I feel like this move is best for me.
As a former Chief Scribe, I can honestly tell you that your CS really doesn't care unless it somehow makes her work more. Even if she does care, there is nothing she can do. Chief Scribes are glorified titles, you just help make the schedule, deal with administrative BS, and are responsible for making sure all shifts are filled; the Account Manager for the physician client is the one who cares, and even then, they do not care either. You're definitely worrying over nothing. As others have said, make sure to get the LOR first. I got 2 from physicians who know me well and saved them to Interfolio. I hope you have built connections with the docs before now, b/c that will really help.

Anyone else worried about asking docs for LOR? Lmao I thought I was the only one in the predicament, I'm quitting soon as well. Honestly don't give a **** about the scribe company, but I gotta secure that LOR .

Any tips bro? I'm in this situation.
Yeah, as I said I just put in my notice, and all of a sudden it's stressing me out.
Tip #1, approach the docs at the end of the shift, or less preferably, way before the shift starts when they're still in a good mood. Obviously make sure to be the best scribe you can be, ask to get them coffee etc the day you ask them for the LOR,...even though its transparent, its human nature also that they will like/remember you better if you're extra nice to them.

Tip #2, ask them for their email address to send them a personal request. They will usually ask like 'um....sure, for what?' if you say 'I wanted to send you my CV and application details and to ask if you'd be comfortable writing me a strong letter of recommendation. If they say 'oh, I'm really busy...' you can shirk off or say 'well, if you're amenable to writing it, anytime in the next 6 months will be fine.'

Tip #3, do this alone. Don't let the other docs hear you ask, its just no good. As a CS, I had the benefit of having the docs personal cells and email addresses, but you don't have this option. Ask the docs alone.

Overall, if I were in your shoes, I'd find when the doc you want to ask is working and if you're not working that day, go on your own time really early to a shift and wait for them in civilian clothes, ask them for their email address for a professional reference purpose. Then e-mail them later professionally for the letter request. After they write the letter/agree to write the letter, send them a $10 starbucks gift card to say thank-you. I did this, and it has worked beautifully. GL!
 

swolebrah

sup
5+ Year Member
Oct 30, 2013
554
269
Status
Medical Student
As a former Chief Scribe, I can honestly tell you that your CS really doesn't care unless it somehow makes her work more. Even if she does care, there is nothing she can do. Chief Scribes are glorified titles, you just help make the schedule, deal with administrative BS, and are responsible for making sure all shifts are filled; the Account Manager for the physician client is the one who cares, and even then, they do not care either. You're definitely worrying over nothing. As others have said, make sure to get the LOR first. I got 2 from physicians who know me well and saved them to Interfolio. I hope you have built connections with the docs before now, b/c that will really help.





Tip #1, approach the docs at the end of the shift, or less preferably, way before the shift starts when they're still in a good mood. Obviously make sure to be the best scribe you can be, ask to get them coffee etc the day you ask them for the LOR,...even though its transparent, its human nature also that they will like/remember you better if you're extra nice to them.

Tip #2, ask them for their email address to send them a personal request. They will usually ask like 'um....sure, for what?' if you say 'I wanted to send you my CV and application details and to ask if you'd be comfortable writing me a strong letter of recommendation. If they say 'oh, I'm really busy...' you can shirk off or say 'well, if you're amenable to writing it, anytime in the next 6 months will be fine.'

Tip #3, do this alone. Don't let the other docs hear you ask, its just no good. As a CS, I had the benefit of having the docs personal cells and email addresses, but you don't have this option. Ask the docs alone.

Overall, if I were in your shoes, I'd find when the doc you want to ask is working and if you're not working that day, go on your own time really early to a shift and wait for them in civilian clothes, ask them for their email address for a professional reference purpose. Then e-mail them later professionally for the letter request. After they write the letter/agree to write the letter, send them a $10 starbucks gift card to say thank-you. I did this, and it has worked beautifully. GL!
Thanks for the tips!!! I'm most likely going to just have to go for the big gamble since we have so many doctors at our hospital rotation, I never really got to know them at a very personal level.

Go in early and ask when no other doctors around, if they say no...I have about 2-3 back up doctors. Hopefully one of them can say yes.

Also I will also be using interfolio, is it easiest to just ask for email instead of giving them the pdf physical copy?

Also good idea about asking early, most of the docs at the hospitals I work at are usually ready to quit after the barrage of "trolls" that enter the ER. Lmao , completely serious. Had one doctor break a computer once cause he was so pissed off .
 
Last edited:

HinduHammer

Righteous in Wrath
5+ Year Member
Aug 6, 2013
642
520
Starfall
Status
Medical Student
Thanks for the tips!!! I'm most likely going to just have to go for the big gamble since we have so many doctors at our hospital rotation, I never really got to know them at a very personal level.

Go in early and ask when no other doctors around, if they say no...I have about 2-3 back up doctors. Hopefully one of them can say yes.

Also I will also be using interfolio, is it easiest to just ask for email instead of giving them the pdf physical copy?

Also good idea about asking early, most of the docs at the hospitals I work at are usually ready to quit after the barrage of "trolls" that enter the ER. Lmao , completely serious. Had one doctor break a computer once cause he was so pissed off .

Yeah, the docs are usually in the best mood before the shift gets going, or after the shift is over because even though they have to complete notes they are done seeing patients. Early = more energy, not pissed off yet, Late = done with responsibilities, get to go home and relax soon. So, both have their advantages. Late has the benefit that if you do an awesome job for them that day, they are more likely to be pleased to write you a letter when asking. This may be more important for you since you don't have strong connections with the docs.

Re your q about inter folio: do you mean that should you ask for their email or just give them the letter request form that inter folio prints off? Umm....definitely email. What % chance do you think the docs will actually care enough to hold that inter folio printed pdf? % makes it to their car? % makes it to their home office? etc... Def email them bc you can answer questions, email them CV, essays, etc (at their request), and most importantly, follow up with them to a. make sure they're sending the letter and gently remind them to do so and b. update them with your progress. they deserve to know how your app cycle is going after working on a letter and c. to send them a thank you gift card to starbucks, dunkin donuts, whatever. It is imperative to send thank you gift cards. They say its not necessary, but trust me, its the right thing to do to say thank you -- after they agree to write the letter and/or after they send it -- you don't want to make it seem like you are bribing them or something.
 

mehc012

Big Damn Hero
7+ Year Member
Jul 9, 2012
9,323
8,340
The Black
Status
Medical Student
As a former Chief Scribe, I can honestly tell you that your CS really doesn't care unless it somehow makes her work more. Even if she does care, there is nothing she can do. Chief Scribes are glorified titles, you just help make the schedule, deal with administrative BS, and are responsible for making sure all shifts are filled; the Account Manager for the physician client is the one who cares, and even then, they do not care either. You're definitely worrying over nothing. As others have said, make sure to get the LOR first. I got 2 from physicians who know me well and saved them to Interfolio. I hope you have built connections with the docs before now, b/c that will really help.





Tip #1, approach the docs at the end of the shift, or less preferably, way before the shift starts when they're still in a good mood. Obviously make sure to be the best scribe you can be, ask to get them coffee etc the day you ask them for the LOR,...even though its transparent, its human nature also that they will like/remember you better if you're extra nice to them.

Tip #2, ask them for their email address to send them a personal request. They will usually ask like 'um....sure, for what?' if you say 'I wanted to send you my CV and application details and to ask if you'd be comfortable writing me a strong letter of recommendation. If they say 'oh, I'm really busy...' you can shirk off or say 'well, if you're amenable to writing it, anytime in the next 6 months will be fine.'

Tip #3, do this alone. Don't let the other docs hear you ask, its just no good. As a CS, I had the benefit of having the docs personal cells and email addresses, but you don't have this option. Ask the docs alone.

Overall, if I were in your shoes, I'd find when the doc you want to ask is working and if you're not working that day, go on your own time really early to a shift and wait for them in civilian clothes, ask them for their email address for a professional reference purpose. Then e-mail them later professionally for the letter request. After they write the letter/agree to write the letter, send them a $10 starbucks gift card to say thank-you. I did this, and it has worked beautifully. GL!
My Chief definitely cares, because we're always stretched to our max due to horrible policies by the company which don't allow the managers to have enough scribes for wiggle room. Thus, anyone quitting means a rush of last-minute hiring and training by her.

As for the tips...that is what annoys me - I live an hour from where I work, so I can't really come in on my own, and there are almost ALWAYS multiple docs sitting next to each other except for night shifts (and most people aren't in the best mood on nights). I have a few docs who I'd really like to ask - one who wrote a letter to my manager spontaneously saying that I was 'the next level of scribe' and one who told me that I am good at putting patients at ease and should just go in the room before him every time so they're in a good mood. But there is no good time to do so, so I think I'll have to settle for a bad time. Oh well.
 

HinduHammer

Righteous in Wrath
5+ Year Member
Aug 6, 2013
642
520
Starfall
Status
Medical Student
My Chief definitely cares, because we're always stretched to our max due to horrible policies by the company which don't allow the managers to have enough scribes for wiggle room. Thus, anyone quitting means a rush of last-minute hiring and training by her.

As for the tips...that is what annoys me - I live an hour from where I work, so I can't really come in on my own, and there are almost ALWAYS multiple docs sitting next to each other except for night shifts (and most people aren't in the best mood on nights). I have a few docs who I'd really like to ask - one who wrote a letter to my manager spontaneously saying that I was 'the next level of scribe' and one who told me that I am good at putting patients at ease and should just go in the room before him every time so they're in a good mood. But there is no good time to do so, so I think I'll have to settle for a bad time. Oh well.
Well, it sounds like you're giving your company enough time to hire a replacement. All my scribes gave notice which was extremely helpful; however, if they didn't but gave me at least a few days, I would have been fine with them. I have no love for scribe companies.

Sounds like you indeed will have to settle for a bad time. If I were you, though, I'd still try to find a time to ask the doc alone, even for an e-mail address. If you see a doc you like going to the lounge or bathroom, ask the doc you're working with if you can go to the bathroom, find the doc, and just say that you wanted to ask him/her in private for their email for a professional reference, then later email them saying you'd like a strong LOR if they're willing.

Worse comes to worse you can ask your manager to give you the doc's email address or to email the doc directly with the reason being an LOR. It sounds like the doc will certainly agree.
 

swolebrah

sup
5+ Year Member
Oct 30, 2013
554
269
Status
Medical Student
My Chief definitely cares, because we're always stretched to our max due to horrible policies by the company which don't allow the managers to have enough scribes for wiggle room. Thus, anyone quitting means a rush of last-minute hiring and training by her.

As for the tips...that is what annoys me - I live an hour from where I work, so I can't really come in on my own, and there are almost ALWAYS multiple docs sitting next to each other except for night shifts (and most people aren't in the best mood on nights). I have a few docs who I'd really like to ask - one who wrote a letter to my manager spontaneously saying that I was 'the next level of scribe' and one who told me that I am good at putting patients at ease and should just go in the room before him every time so they're in a good mood. But there is no good time to do so, so I think I'll have to settle for a bad time. Oh well.
Well, it sounds like you're giving your company enough time to hire a replacement. All my scribes gave notice which was extremely helpful; however, if they didn't but gave me at least a few days, I would have been fine with them. I have no love for scribe companies.

Sounds like you indeed will have to settle for a bad time. If I were you, though, I'd still try to find a time to ask the doc alone, even for an e-mail address. If you see a doc you like going to the lounge or bathroom, ask the doc you're working with if you can go to the bathroom, find the doc, and just say that you wanted to ask him/her in private for their email for a professional reference, then later email them saying you'd like a strong LOR if they're willing.

Worse comes to worse you can ask your manager to give you the doc's email address or to email the doc directly with the reason being an LOR. It sounds like the doc will certainly agree.
Yup similar situation as mehc. Appreciate all the help Hindu. Best of luck in the applications .
 

mehc012

Big Damn Hero
7+ Year Member
Jul 9, 2012
9,323
8,340
The Black
Status
Medical Student
Well, it sounds like you're giving your company enough time to hire a replacement. All my scribes gave notice which was extremely helpful; however, if they didn't but gave me at least a few days, I would have been fine with them. I have no love for scribe companies.

Sounds like you indeed will have to settle for a bad time. If I were you, though, I'd still try to find a time to ask the doc alone, even for an e-mail address. If you see a doc you like going to the lounge or bathroom, ask the doc you're working with if you can go to the bathroom, find the doc, and just say that you wanted to ask him/her in private for their email for a professional reference, then later email them saying you'd like a strong LOR if they're willing.

Worse comes to worse you can ask your manager to give you the doc's email address or to email the doc directly with the reason being an LOR. It sounds like the doc will certainly agree.
Yeah, I get it. I will find a time, it just won't be ideal (the bathrooms are in the middle of the ER right by the workstation and the docs never go to a lounge...it's 12hrs straight shift with maybe a few minutes for lunch but usually they just heat something up and eat it at the desk). I'll stay late for a night shift one of these days...catch them at that sweet spot where they're still amped up for the night but suddenly run out of patients and see the light at the end of the tunnel (aka they'll only have to see a few more patients throughout the rest of the night and they know it). It really would have to be worst-case for me to talk to my manager, ever. I love our scheduling manager, but the one who talks to the docs is at least 30% of why I'm quitting (and only that low of a number because I dismiss her from my brain so much that she can't account for any more than that.) Plus I'd prefer to ask in person anyway, easier to judge reactions!


I'm more lamenting the fact that I have to do it, because I always find asking for LORs to be awkward and uncomfortable. But your advice is spot on, and well appreciated!
 

swolebrah

sup
5+ Year Member
Oct 30, 2013
554
269
Status
Medical Student
Well, it sounds like you're giving your company enough time to hire a replacement. All my scribes gave notice which was extremely helpful; however, if they didn't but gave me at least a few days, I would have been fine with them. I have no love for scribe companies.

Sounds like you indeed will have to settle for a bad time. If I were you, though, I'd still try to find a time to ask the doc alone, even for an e-mail address. If you see a doc you like going to the lounge or bathroom, ask the doc you're working with if you can go to the bathroom, find the doc, and just say that you wanted to ask him/her in private for their email for a professional reference, then later email them saying you'd like a strong LOR if they're willing.

Worse comes to worse you can ask your manager to give you the doc's email address or to email the doc directly with the reason being an LOR. It sounds like the doc will certainly agree.

quick update, thanks to your advice I got a doctor willing to write me a good LOR. I told him I will send him a email since I'm using interfolio. Did you put anything in the message box when you were creating the interfolio LOR request? Also did you wait a few days after you talked to the doc to send the request?

Thanks again for all the help!

Also definitely helps to ask early on, I could see him stressing out after the 25-30 pts we saw later that shift.
 
  • Like
Reactions: HinduHammer

HinduHammer

Righteous in Wrath
5+ Year Member
Aug 6, 2013
642
520
Starfall
Status
Medical Student
quick update, thanks to your advice I got a doctor willing to write me a good LOR. I told him I will send him a email since I'm using interfolio. Did you put anything in the message box when you were creating the interfolio LOR request? Also did you wait a few days after you talked to the doc to send the request?

Thanks again for all the help!

Also definitely helps to ask early on, I could see him stressing out after the 25-30 pts we saw later that shift.
Glad I could help! I sent the doc an email from my personal email address directly with my CV and PS attached and a description of how inter folio worked. I said if he had any questions to email me anytime and that I would appreciate if he could do it within the next 3-4 weeks but if he/she needed more time that would be absolutely fine. Then a few minutes later I sent the inter folio request, in the box I just said "thanks again for your help. Dr. X - HH" Either at this point or after the letter is received I would send a $10 e-gift card for starbucks as a thank you. I sent it when I sent the request so the doc could theoretically enjoy a coffee on me whilst writing my rec letter. Others would send the thank you card after the letter is submitted. Glad it worked out for you.
 
  • Like
Reactions: swolebrah

swolebrah

sup
5+ Year Member
Oct 30, 2013
554
269
Status
Medical Student
Glad I could help! I sent the doc an email from my personal email address directly with my CV and PS attached and a description of how inter folio worked. I said if he had any questions to email me anytime and that I would appreciate if he could do it within the next 3-4 weeks but if he/she needed more time that would be absolutely fine. Then a few minutes later I sent the inter folio request, in the box I just said "thanks again for your help. Dr. X - HH" Either at this point or after the letter is received I would send a $10 e-gift card for starbucks as a thank you. I sent it when I sent the request so the doc could theoretically enjoy a coffee on me whilst writing my rec letter. Others would send the thank you card after the letter is submitted. Glad it worked out for you.
Thanks again! Best of luck in your application cycle.
 
May 7, 2015
515
382
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
For the bigger scribing companies at larger hospitals, how hard is it to actually get to know one of the docs for a letter that isn't a generic 'he was a good scribe'?
 

mehc012

Big Damn Hero
7+ Year Member
Jul 9, 2012
9,323
8,340
The Black
Status
Medical Student
For the bigger scribing companies at larger hospitals, how hard is it to actually get to know one of the docs for a letter that isn't a generic 'he was a good scribe'?
If you are assigned to a single doctor for your full shift, you will get to know someone.