Oct 9, 2012
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Medical Student
I'm a Med1 getting ready to do some shadowing in radiology, and Im looking to bone up on my anatomy from the fall semester. I've found lots of online resources for radiology residents that seem to be tailored to determining stuff like "what is the right modality?" for a given situation, or "what is abnormal here?". Honestly though, I still feel like I'm at the point where I need to get my radiological anatomy down so I can get as much as possible out of the shadowing experience. At this point, I'll be happy if I can look at the various studies that come across the computer, and be able to identify the "normal anatomy" efficiently.

I suppose my main goal would be a recommendation for a solid (and base level) web resource or textbook focussed on radiology anatomy? A second question to any resident/attending out there would be if you've seen any Canadians come through (interview or match) your program in the past few years. I know our schools are licensed by the same organization and that we write the same shelf exams, but I really don't know if that translates into many of us matching south of the border.

Thanks in advance for any insight, I know you're all busy people.
 

colbgw02

Delightfully Tacky
10+ Year Member
Dec 9, 2004
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By the guy with the thing at the place
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You're a first-year medical student who's worrying about the same things that a first-year radiology resident does. Don't.

I realize this doesn't answer your question, but it sounds like you're looking to get the wrong things out of your shadowing experience. Like a college biochemistry class for a medical student, anything you learn now will be a drop in the bucket for a radioloy resident. You could do a great job of learning MRI neuroanatomy, for example, but it won't help you very much for the rest of medical school and - by extension - for matching into radiology. And when you do your first neuroradiology rotation, you will be expected to know that anatomy by day 3, irrespective of your background or experience.

Just as the ortho intern on an MSK month or the pulmonology fellow doing a chest rotation doesn't really learn or understand radiology, you won't get too much out of your shadowing, even if you know your anatomy cold. I mean, it's a 4-year program with near-obligatory fellowship for a reason.

To me, shadowing is much more about deciding whether or not radiology is even worth persuing. I completely understand the desire to maximize your experience, but make sure you have realistic expectations. Being able to "identify 'normal anatomy' efficiently" means precisely squadoosh.
 
Dec 9, 2011
1,370
516
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You're a first-year medical student who's worrying about the same things that a first-year radiology resident does. Don't.

I realize this doesn't answer your question, but it sounds like you're looking to get the wrong things out of your shadowing experience. Like a college biochemistry class for a medical student, anything you learn now will be a drop in the bucket for a radioloy resident. You could do a great job of learning MRI neuroanatomy, for example, but it won't help you very much for the rest of medical school and - by extension - for matching into radiology. And when you do your first neuroradiology rotation, you will be expected to know that anatomy by day 3, irrespective of your background or experience.

Just as the ortho intern on an MSK month or the pulmonology fellow doing a chest rotation doesn't really learn or understand radiology, you won't get too much out of your shadowing, even if you know your anatomy cold. I mean, it's a 4-year program with near-obligatory fellowship for a reason.

To me, shadowing is much more about deciding whether or not radiology is even worth persuing. I completely understand the desire to maximize your experience, but make sure you have realistic expectations. Being able to "identify 'normal anatomy' efficiently" means precisely squadoosh.
Totally agree.

Being able to identify anatomy efficiently is almost equal to be a radiologists and in some parts of the body is equal to being a sub-specialist.

Try to see whether you like the day to day work of radiology or not. As a first year, it is very blind to say you are interested in radiology. Your decision should be made as MS4.
 

Doctor D

10+ Year Member
Jun 2, 2008
422
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Medical Student
Radiology is the best field of medicine. Congrats on your foresight. Learning radiology.com, there is also an excellent book that goes with it.
 
C

cowme

Try to see whether you like the day to day work of radiology or not. As a first year, it is very blind to say you are interested in radiology. Your decision should be made as MS4.
I knew I wanted to be a radiologist as a first year medical student. Everything I assumed I would like about the field turned out to be true
 
Dec 9, 2011
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I knew I wanted to be a radiologist as a first year medical student. Everything I assumed I would like about the field turned out to be true
You can not generalize you personal experience.

The best way to choose a field is to get as much exposure as you can to different fields and then choose with open eye.
As a first year you do not know anything about many fields and most of your assumptions are incorrect.