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Reactivity + stability

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Raiden2012

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I've got a question about peptides and amino acids. Breakup of peptides to form amino acids is thermodynamically stable usually because of the increase in entropy. However, amino acids are more reactive due to the functional groups. So is it possible for amino acid to be more stable and more reactive?

Seems like a paradox.
 

sciencebooks

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I've got a question about peptides and amino acids. Breakup of peptides to form amino acids is thermodynamically stable usually because of the increase in entropy. However, amino acids are more reactive due to the functional groups. So is it possible for amino acid to be more stable and more reactive?

Seems like a paradox.

Are the thermodynamics that simple? What about enthalpy? To break bonds in endothermic so with enthalpy AND entropy positive wouldn't the Gibb's free energy depend upon temperature or am I overthinking it?
 

Raiden2012

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Are the thermodynamics that simple? What about enthalpy? To break bonds in endothermic so with enthalpy AND entropy positive wouldn't the Gibb's free energy depend upon temperature or am I overthinking it?

Yup you're right. But I believe EK mentioned somewhere that it is generally the case that peptide hydrolysis to form amino acids is thermodynamically stable. I have to go look for the page now
 

sciencebooks

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Yup you're right. But I believe EK mentioned somewhere that it is generally the case that peptide hydrolysis to form amino acids is thermodynamically stable. I have to go look for the page now

Oh okay. Hm, why would amino acids be more reactive? Since even even in a polypeptide, there's still one end with an amino group and one end with a carbonyl group. Is it just because it's smaller?
 
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