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Received an II at a T5 school where my MCAT barely makes the lowest 10th percentile and my GPA falls well below it. 515/3.61 cGPA/3.5 sGPA URM, disadvantaged with good ECs. Do I have any real shot at getting an A? My interview skills are pretty decent but nothing award-winning.
 

candbgirl

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They would not have interviewed you if they weren’t interested in meeting you and ultimately accepting you. Prepare for the interview and make them want to accept you. As @Goro says “ it’s all on you now”! Good luck and let us know how it turns out.
 
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IMO you may need a greater than great performance because you will have less wiggle room compare to similar applicants with higher stats. Do whatever you can do to ace this interview.
 
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KnightDoc

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Received an II at a T5 school where my MCAT barely makes the lowest 10th percentile and my GPA falls well below it. 515/3.61 cGPA/3.5 sGPA URM, disadvantaged with good ECs. Do I have any real shot at getting an A? My interview skills are pretty decent but nothing award-winning.
As the others have said, they wouldn't waste their time if you didn't have a real shot. Given the effort many schools are making to diversify their classes and make accommodations for low SES URMs who might have excellent reasons for having below average stats, you can't look at any school's medians to determine YOUR chances.

515/3.6 might be well below average at a T5, but it is more than adequate to predict success in med school. Clearly, they see something they like in your application. Just go in with all the confidence in the world and do your best. Good luck!!!
 
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IMO you may need a greater than great performance because you will have less wiggle room compare to similar applicants with higher stats. Do whatever you can do to ace this interview.

What counts as a "greater than great performance"? So far I've approached all of my interviews by being my honest self and I don't know how to improve on that.
 
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KnightDoc

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What counts as a "greater than great performance"? So far I've approached all of my interviews by being my honest self and I don't know how to improve on that.
I'm a pre-applicant, so please take my comments with a grain of salt, but I think you are absolutely fine. The comment you are asking about is referring to a staircase analogy many of us like which says that we all enter the admissions staircase on a different step, and if you are on a lower step, you need to excel in the interview in order to climb to the level necessary to receive an A.

I happen to think that your "URM, disadvantaged with good ECs" status probably puts you on a higher step than would otherwise be indicated by your stats, so this "greater than great" performance requirement doesn't apply to you. In any event, your point is very well taken -- you are who you are and can only do your best, even if it's not good enough.

I don't think it's accurate, or productive, to think in terms of needing to be something other than your honest self, or to be "greater than great" in order to have a real shot at an A. You are already "greater than great" - you scored an II at a T5!!!!! Now just be yourself and go close the deal. :cool:
 
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deleted889094

I'm a pre-applicant, so please take my comments with a grain of salt, but I think you are absolutely fine. The comment you are asking about is referring to a staircase analogy many of us like which says that we all enter the admissions staircase on a different step, and if you are on a lower step, you need to excel in the interview in order to climb to the level necessary to receive an A.

I happen to think that your "URM, disadvantaged with good ECs" status probably puts you on a higher step than would otherwise be indicated by your stats, so this "greater than great" performance requirement doesn't apply to you. In any event, your point is very well taken -- you are who you are and can only do you best, even if it's not good enough.

I don't think it's accurate, or productive, to think in terms of needing to be something other than your honest self, or to be "greater than great" in order to have a real shot at an A. You are already "greater than great" - you scored an II at a T5!!!!! Now just be yourself and go close the deal. :cool:
This isn't exactly right. Being URM or disadvantaged doesn't affect how you should perform in an interview. Every interviewee is there to prove they have the desired qualities.
 

KnightDoc

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This isn't exactly right. Being URM or disadvantaged doesn't affect how you should perform in an interview. Every interviewee is there to prove they have the desired qualities.
Of course. My point was simply that a low SES or URM with given stats is not necessarily entering the staircase at the same level as a high SES ORM or White candidate with the same stats. Everyone always needs to do their best, but a low SES URM 516/3.6 does not have to be "greater than great" like someone else with similar stats might have to be.
 

EdgeTrimmer

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Received an II at a T5 school where my MCAT barely makes the lowest 10th percentile and my GPA falls well below it. 515/3.61 cGPA/3.5 sGPA URM, disadvantaged with good ECs. Do I have any real shot at getting an A? My interview skills are pretty decent but nothing award-winning.
Did you see previous years URM threads to see how previous applicants with similar stats did?

 

KnightDoc

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Did you see previous years URM threads to see how previous applicants with similar stats did?

Fascinating, but what does this have to do with someone asking about an II in 2020 at a T5 with stats in their 10%-ile????

Again, I think OP is fine by virtue of the II, but I'm not sure what light 3 years' worth of URM threads will shed on the issue raised by the post. He has the II. The hard part is done. All he has to do now is not worry about where he stands as compared to everyone else's stats, and just close the deal.
 

EdgeTrimmer

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Fascinating, but what does this have to do with someone asking about an II in 2020 at a T5 with stats in their 10%-ile????

Again, I think OP is fine by virtue of the II, but I'm not sure what light 3 years' worth of URM threads will shed on the issue raised by the post. He has the II. The hard part is done. All he has to do now is not worry about where he stands as compared to everyone else's stats, and just close the deal.
Isn't 10th percentile mentioned in MSAR for all students combined? OP seems to worried about his stats so I am suggesting given URM and disadvantaged status looking at previous years URM threads may give some insight vs general advise of don't worry, you did your part.
 
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deleted889094

Of course. My point was simply that a low SES or URM with given stats is not necessarily entering the staircase at the same level as a high SES ORM or White candidate with the same stats. Everyone always needs to do their best, but a low SES URM 516/3.6 does not have to be "greater than great" like someone else with similar stats might have to be.
I understood your point. I am saying that that only applies to getting the II. The standards for interview performance are not different based on SES/race as far as I know. Giving an advantage for academics because of overcoming adversity makes sense. It does not make sense for the interview.
 

KnightDoc

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I understood your point. I am saying that that only applies to getting the II. The standards for interview performance are not different based on SES/race as far as I know. Giving an advantage for academics because of overcoming adversity makes sense. It does not make sense for the interview.
And I understand your point. I'm afraid I am either not being clear or you are not referring to the staircase analogy.

Yes, interview performances are definitely judged without regard to SES, race, or anything other than the actual performance. The point of the staircase analogy is that different levels of interview performance are required to receive an A, depending on what step you are on going into the interview.

A low SES URM is probably on a higher step than a high SES ORM with a given set of stats, all else being equal (and, of course, all else is never equal! :cool:). What this means is that the OP probably doesn't need to be "greater than great" in his interview to score an A, even though standards for performance are the same for everyone.

A 516 is also the same for everyone, but, not really after taking into account the obstacles some people have to overcome to achieve that score as compared to others. That's why some people with 516s receive IIs from T5s while other people with 520+ don't.
 
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deleted889094

And I understand your point. I'm afraid I am either not being clear or you are not referring to the staircase analogy.

Yes, interview performances are definitely judged without regard to SES, race, or anything other than the actual performance. The point of the staircase analogy is that different levels of interview performance are required to receive an A, depending on what step you are on going into the interview.

A low SES URM is probably on a higher step than a high SES ORM with a given set of stats, all else being equal (and, of course, all else is never equal! :cool:). What this means is that the OP probably doesn't need to be "greater than great" in his interview to score an A, even though standards for performance are the same for everyone.

A 516 is also the same for everyone, but, not really after taking into account the obstacles some people have to overcome to achieve that score as compared to others. That's why some people with 516s receive IIs from T5s while other people with 520+ don't.
Think about what that says.

When you are giving advantage with academics, you are saying "This person had a disadvantage so we don't expect them to have the same grades as someone with no disadvantage."

When you give an advantage with the interview, you are saying "This person had a disadvantage so we don't expect them to be able to communicate and demonstrate people skills like someone with no disadvantage."

But instead of us continuing to go back and forth over something neither of us have direct knowledge of, why don't we just appeal to someone like @Goro or @LizzyM to clear this up for OP before we derail the thread
 

Goro

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Received an II at a T5 school where my MCAT barely makes the lowest 10th percentile and my GPA falls well below it. 515/3.61 cGPA/3.5 sGPA URM, disadvantaged with good ECs. Do I have any real shot at getting an A? My interview skills are pretty decent but nothing award-winning.
Getting accepted is 100% on you
 
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LizzyM

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Today I watched about 20 minutes of a new movie on Netflix called Hllbilly Elegy based on the book by the same name. Look at the scene early in the film where he goes to dinner with law firm partners who may hire him as a summer associate and tell me that there isn't, or shouldn't be, a different way of measuring one's ability to do the job based on what passes for an interview in some circumstances in this country. Go back to the (maybe troll) post about full Winsor knots and any of the dozens of posts about dressing for an interview. If we are to judge someone based on the width of their tie, their wristwatch brand, or any other superficial characteristic that often speaks of money and entitlement, then we are going to miss out on may highly qualified applicants that we very much need in American health care if we are to adequately care for all Americans as they deserve.
 
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deleted889094

Today I watched about 20 minutes of a new movie on Netflix called Hllbilly Elegy based on the book by the same name. Look at the scene early in the film where he goes to dinner with law firm partners who may hire him as a summer associate and tell me that there isn't, or shouldn't be, a different way of measuring one's ability to do the job based on what passes for an interview in some circumstances in this country. Go back to the (maybe troll) post about full Winsor knots and any of the dozens of posts about dressing for an interview. If we are to judge someone based on the width of their tie, their wristwatch brand, or any other superficial characteristic that often speaks of money and entitlement, then we are going to miss out on may highly qualified applicants that we very much need in American health care if we are to adequately care for all Americans as they deserve.
I just watched that. I enjoyed it.

I was under the impression that medical school interviews were already doing just that: evaluating based on personal qualities that are desirable for doctors. Or are at least attempting to.

I only take issue with the idea that simply being a different race gives you different interview scoring or probably of acceptance regardless of personal qualities.
 

LizzyM

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I just watched that. I enjoyed it.

I was under the impression that medical school interviews were already doing just that: evaluating based on personal qualities that are desirable for doctors. Or are at least attempting to.

I only take issue with the idea that simply being a different race gives you different interview scoring or probably of acceptance regardless of personal qualities.
We all have implicit biases. We have to acknowledge and recognize them and compenstate the best we can. Implilcit bias often gives black and brown candidates a lower interview score than they'd otherwise have. Do you take issue with that?
 
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deleted889094

We all have implicit biases. We have to acknowledge and recognize them and compenstate the best we can. Implilcit bias often gives black and brown candidates a lower interview score than they'd otherwise have. Do you take issue with that?
I guess I'm just not convinced on implicit bias having such a strong effect. I mean if it's simply race that's harming a person's chances, of course anyone would take issue with that. But I'm not convinced by what I'm familiar with that it's unconscious factors causing unfairness. I'd need to be convinced that individuals are unable to suspend their biases before I'd be cool with a corrective policy. Luckily I'm not in charge of such decisions. I appreciate your wisdom in the issue.

Edit: Words
 
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Bloobury

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Received an II at a T5 school where my MCAT barely makes the lowest 10th percentile and my GPA falls well below it. 515/3.61 cGPA/3.5 sGPA URM, disadvantaged with good ECs. Do I have any real shot at getting an A? My interview skills are pretty decent but nothing award-winning.
Hi friend! No real advice - just came here to say that I got an II from a school where my GPA is pretty much in the bottom 10th percentile too (not a T5 by any stretch, but it's my top choice school). I have to keep reminding myself what has been said over and over again in various threads on here. They wouldn't interview someone they didn't think had what it takes! Someone has to be in the bottom 10th percentile. Might as well be us!

Good luck, and you'll do just fine!
 

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Received an II at a T5 school where my MCAT barely makes the lowest 10th percentile and my GPA falls well below it. 515/3.61 cGPA/3.5 sGPA URM, disadvantaged with good ECs. Do I have any real shot at getting an A? My interview skills are pretty decent but nothing award-winning.
They are not wasting their time interviewing you if you don't have a shot. Just do the best you can. No self-defeating thoughts on the way in. Focus on your great ECs and how you fit at the program. If there was a dip in grades, be prepared to address it, but don't raise it unless asked. Apparently, they've gotten past it.

Good luck!
 
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